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46

I can reassure you that eating anywhere in London is not perceived as out of the ordinary. Any place you want to have lunch/dinner of just a coffee they will serve you with out any hesitation. London is a very busy city, individuals eating alone is common especially in the city centre where most businesses are placed.


34

London has a constant flow of business travellers who are on their own and likely to be seen dining single. Also, there are several neighbourhoods that cater to the singles crowd. As a consequence, there is no stigma attached to eating alone like there might be in other cosmopolitan cities. But more to the point, London restaurants will happily ...


32

No. You don't tip unless it's a delivery charge. For example, if you order takeout food and have them deliver (especially common in hotels), then you'd want to tip the driver. From Wikipedia: Tips are also generally given for services provided in golf courses, casino, hotels, concierge, food delivery, taxis, spa and salons. If you're going to the ...


20

Google reverse image search says that it might be Feldkirch, Vorarlberg. Indeed the church and the first house in the foreground (the one with the two windows underneath the straight part of the roof) seem to be the ones in the picture below from Wikipedia: File:Feldkirch3.jpg, Wikimedia Commons, CC by SA 3.0 Google maps places it here. By precise ...


16

The typical restaurant meal in Italy is made up of four courses: Antipasto - the starter Primo - first course (usually pasta or soup) Secondo e contorno - second course (usually meat or fish) with sides (usually vegetables) Dolce - dessert These courses can be further wrapped by serving an aperitivo (aperitif) before the meal, and coffee and ammazzacaffé ...


16

No, I wouldn't. A tip is for good service (someone bringing food drink to your table, keeping on top of your requests etc.) but with takeout you're buying a product. Its similar to going to McDonalds or Wendy's. Generally, its waiters and waitresses that get tips as they make a lower Federal minimum wage than the other staff. While some states have laws ...


15

Eating Alone Rocks! I will not deny that there might be a social stigma associated with eating alone in some cultures/countries. Comments like "what a loser" immediately come to mind. Truth be told, people will always watch/stare/comment/judge since curiosity is an intrinsic part of human nature. The bottom line is that you should not care. There is ...


12

Generally the worker at the cashier will take tips if given, but they aren't required. Usually the "tip jar" in those circumstances serves as a "put that pocket change you didn't actually want here," like if you're paying cash or the like. Just because there is a jar of some sort next to the cash register doesn't mean they take tips, either; Some ...


11

The people at the takeout counter probably aren't dependent largely on tips as their primary wage (as waitstaff in the US are), but if your order is complicated, it is courteous to tip. And, I'd recommend being consistent with a dollar or two if this is a neighborhood restaurant you order from frequently — they'll remember. The blog "Wait But Why" has a ...


10

Even for an hungry italian a complete menu is too much! In fact, lot of restaurant suggest some "touristic" menus and all of these menus exclude a part of complete menu; for example are Starter - First course and Dessert or First and Second course and Dessert. Restaurants manager know this so, when you eat "alla carta" (ordering what you want from menu) they ...


9

It's feldkirch. I live near there. (It's the view from the schattenburg, the blue "hypo" sign in both pictures is the same sign)


8

Borough Market, near Southwark Cathedral, very often has a lot of stalls selling good food during the day with a few benches to sit on, but maybe not so much at night. I spend a lot of time in London on my own and there are a lot of "apartment" style hotels, where you get (essentially) a studio flat. There will be a kitchenette, plates and cutlery and it ...


7

I often end up eating alone, and you won't stand out. You particularly won't stand out if you are in a hotel aimed at business men/women, but the food / atmosphere may be boring, and you want to avoid that. I know of no restaurants in London that cater explicitly for single diners (and it would seem a very odd concept). You just get a table for two. Bring a ...


6

Konoko (more commonly kuchiko) and konowata are both examples of chinmi, strong-tasting delicacies intended to be eaten in small quantities as an accompaniment to liquor. There thus aren't any restaurants that specialize in them, they're more the kind of thing you will (or will not) find on a rotating menu of today's specials. But here is one random ...


6

Call the number and make a reservation. If you can't find the number then here's the information that TripAdvisor has on the venue: The Fat Duck High St, Bray, West Berkshire SL6 2AQ, United Kingdom 00441628580333


6

What you want is a casual dining place. Any formal restaurant tends to have all groups and couples, so you'd stand out. If you like Mideastern food, try Edgware Road. There are many Mid-eastern cafés. One of my favourites is Beirut Cafe. (Nearest Tube: Marble Arch) If you like Vietnamese food, try Kingsland Road. There are half a dozen Vietnamese ...


6

I have raised three children and know the problem intimately. This answer is about bringing the baby along (you asked: "is there another solution to this problem?") At the Northern end of Rue Mouffetard, you'll find a covey of small restaurants, all of which provide a venue for comfortable, family-friendly restaurants. There's about a dozen of these ...


5

In addition to the kebabs, falafels, pizzas and US-style burger joints European cities have their own variants of cheap, available, mostly eat-on-your-feet food. These are not as healthy as the Asian counterparts, unfortunately. Netherlands: Patat (french fries), kroket (deep fried thing with pulverised meat), and other meaty products like frikandel, and ...


5

I've worked in a bunch of restaurants (many years ago) as both a waitress and a bartender. In both instances I've placed takeout orders for customers either in the restaurant or calling in to pick up. At the time I was making below the standard minimum wage because it's assumed by the government that I'll make it up in tips. That was not always the case. ...


5

The tourist tax is a legitimate tax, and it varies across Indonesia because it is applied at the local district level rather than as a national tax. Areas that are more likely to see tourist activity and do not have other income sources are those most likely to apply a tourist tax, with Bali being a prime example. The best source I've found for this ...


5

For a standardized American breakfast: McDonald's, Im Tal 6 (near Marienplatz) opens at 6:00; Hauptbahnhof (downstairs near S-Bahn) open 24/7. Burger King, twice at Hauptbahnhof, open 24/7. Starbucks, Hauptbahnhof, opens at 3:30.


5

After some searching on Foursquare and Google Maps I've found the following places: Sultan Backparadies Open from 6AM to 10PM and located 800 meters from the heart of Oktoberfest. The address is Goethestraße 40. Judging by the photos, the place serves eggs, salad, sandwiches and a variety of bakery. Dunkin Donuts Open 24 hours per day and located near ...


4

Its probably Chez Clément ! This restaurant has a lot of pots hung on the ceiling by the entrance.


4

In the US, it is generally advised you do not tip for takeout; however, this does not prohibit you from tipping the cashier anyways (which I do). There's no concrete answer for this. Remember, tipping is a way to show that you appreciate the service wrought upon you; people don't tip if the service is bad or horrible, or tip less. For myself, if I have to ...


3

This is a concept that simply does not exist (at least not in widespread form) in Europe, and if it did exist, it probably would not be popular. While the USA has many people who love being spoiled by services (e.g. getting your groceries delivered to your car instead of taking them there yourself; getting your dinner delivered to your car instead of having ...


2

It's Melech HaFelafel on the corner of King George and Agripas. (And has been there for decades).


2

Wong Kei on Wardour Street (in China Town) used to have tables up stairs for bigger groups, and singles and pairs were sent downstairs to sit on these long bench-like tables. This is sort of catering for eating alone, as everyone else downstairs is as well. I haven't been since they refurbished though, so it may have changed (can anyone confirm or deny?) ...


2

You can find sea cucumber in markets near harbor or hotel restaurant. The price is around NT$400/600g in port markets, but it depends on some factors. In hotel restaurant, a set of sea cucumber in Evergreen Hotel is about NT$2000. I think there are meals of sea cucumber in most 5-star hotel. If you can read Chinese, have a check on this website for this ...


2

It's not uncommon, so you can buy them in any traditional market. There are, however, the real one and the "fake" one. I will recommend going to a decent restaurant and order a dish with it. Most fancier Chinese restaurants should have it.


2

In general, most restaurants in Paris will accept childs/babies with no particular issues, except maybe in the expensive ones. A good way to check the restaurant acceptance is to ask for a 'siège enfant' (child seat), many restaurants have one or two ready for customers. If you intend to keep your baby in it's trolley, just be careful not to disturb other ...



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