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24

It's not legal to sell cat meat in Switzerland, neither raw nor cooked. The Swiss Regulation of the Confederate Department of Interior on food of animal origin, article 2 has a list of animals of which the meat can be sold or distributed as food. It is therefore unlikely that you will find a restaurant catering with cat meat. If there are any, they are at ...


16

In continental Europe, use cash, nothing else. That's a simple rule you should follow, all other discussions are a distraction. There are some differences between countries but generally speaking tipping on the credit card is highly unusual, in most countries you won't find any routine way to add a tip on the bill and many people will not know what to do if ...


16

The classical way to go about this is to leave cash on the table. Your receipt will usually come in either a receipt-wallet (left), or a small plate of some kind (right): After you pay for the meal, drop the tip in there. Usually this means that the waiter who attended you will collect the tip, before clearing the table for the next customers. You can ...


11

In the Netherlands, Belgium and Germany its very common to tell the waiter, make it (Price+ Price * 5-10%) euro. Then they will simply input this in there credit card reader, and it get's sorted at the end of the day. (Your tip is divided along all staff working during your visit.) Source: I live in The Netherlands close to the Belgium and German border, ...


10

In Sweden - when paying with credit card - you almost always get the option of specifying the total amount you want to pay. Many people don't use cash at all any more so it is the only way for the restaurant staff to get a tip. (I guess it then depends on the restaurant if and how it is distributed among the staff.) This seems to differ from most of ...


8

Seoul has two 'real' Chinatowns: 1) Garibong-dong (가리봉동), down the hill from near Guro (구로) stn exit 3. This is the larger of the two, and insular to the point that not many Koreans, much less other tourists, venture here. It's also under threat from a giant redevelopment project that's been imminent for several years, but I was unable to find any ...


6

I have raised three children and know the problem intimately. This answer is about bringing the baby along (you asked: "is there another solution to this problem?") At the Northern end of Rue Mouffetard, you'll find a covey of small restaurants, all of which provide a venue for comfortable, family-friendly restaurants. There's about a dozen of these ...


5

Washington has a well-known height restriction on its buildings; you'll find no places with panoramic views of downtown or the monumental core within the District. The rooftop scene is alive and well during the summer months, however. If you just want a view of the local neighborhood and perhaps the Washington Monument (which can be seen from a significant ...


5

Just FWIW I'd say for (1) yes it's perfectly OK to put the money in the folder, and just get up and leave. you're the heavily paying customer, you've paid and you're done. at a cafe that would be normal. maybe the staff will wave bye-bye to you. at a nice restaurant, the staff SHOULD come and fuss over you as you leave! for (2) inside the book, just so ...


5

The typical restaurant meal in Italy is made up of four courses: Antipasto - the starter Primo - first course (usually pasta or soup) Secondo e contorno - second course (usually meat or fish) with sides (usually vegetables) Dolce - dessert These courses can be further wrapped by serving an aperitivo (aperitif) before the meal, and coffee and ammazzacaffé ...


4

According to this blog, there is a "gigantic authentic unofficial Chinatown" in Seoul near "Guro-go": The address is: Yenbian Street: Garibong-dong, Guro-gu


4

In almost all European countries I've been so far, I observed that most people do it the following way (and I also have done it a lot and it almost never caused any troubles or uncertainties): After receiving the bill, I added a 5% - 10% tip and told the waiter the total amount, including the tip I want to pay. The total amount was then typed into the ...


4

I don't think there is a single correct way to do this. Leaving cultural difference aside, and drawing from personal experience (as a guest, not as a waiter), I would say you can either of the things you mentioned, the waiters will act accordingly. If you have exactly the amount you want/have to pay (including cash), you can either put the money on the ...


4

Good to hear you like Romania so far, my suggestion is you visit more of the west part, Transilvania (Sibiu, Brasov, Sighisoara or Cluj) than Bucharest. I don't think you should feel obliged to tip at all. Romania in not a third world country although it is the second poorest in the EU. Tipping in hotels, I do not know about, as a Romanian. Do the same you ...


3

Couvert is obligatory to pay, especially if you take a seat. It is illegal though in Lazio due to regional law (even if they usually don’t care about this law, but if you’re willing to argue...)


3

If you really want to dine with the locals and eat authentic cuisine of the place you are visiting check out this new website EatWith which enables you to have local dining experiences in people's homes around the world. See also their Twitter page.


2

In general, most restaurants in Paris will accept childs/babies with no particular issues, except maybe in the expensive ones. A good way to check the restaurant acceptance is to ask for a 'siège enfant' (child seat), many restaurants have one or two ready for customers. If you intend to keep your baby in it's trolley, just be careful not to disturb other ...


2

I think the most standard scenario is visibly leaving the money (or a credit card) in the book/cup/whatever. Make sure banknotes cannot fly away and wait. The waiter will expect you to do that and try to check again shortly. Just laying the cash and leaving is not the end of the world but it's clearly not the usual way, at least in France. If they are too ...


1

Interesting comments about Bandar Persian Restaurant on the net (including a claim that a tip was added to the bill after signing it with no tip), but nothing about adding auto-tips to small parties. It's a pretty common practice with larger parties (6, or sometimes less) but it's normally noted on the menu. I could see them wanting to do it if there's a ...


1

I was in Uruguay for about a year we don't have any Indian restaurants. The closest thing would be Chinese fried rice in Jaun bonito blank st (I don't remember the exact location). But you also have good Indian food in Argentina 3-4 hrs from port of Montevideo. Delhi taj and bombay. We also don't get any Indian grocery there. All Indians stock kilograms of ...


1

An interesting solution that I've been using lately is resorting to group sale websites like groupon. I've heard all kind of theories about why the restaurants want to be there - from the near bankrupt last resort saving tool to the bad food restaurant trying to save the day. In my experience I always got a nice meal at an affordable price. (depending on ...


1

In most of the restaurants or cafes, there is no expectation of a tip from the table. In addition, in touristic areas the prices are very high. The local people and the tourists are seeing different menus, where of course, the touristic prices are way too expensive. So, especially in those places you should not feel obligated to tip, but if you like the ...


1

In Slovakia, service and all taxes are included in the price of meals/beverage. If you see in the menu a sandwich for 1.23 EUR and a drink for 0.69 EUR your total will be 1.92 EUR, this is what you pay the waitress. If you pay by cash she will bring you 0.08 EUR in change and if you don't need to be bothered by the cents you can leave her 3 cents and take ...



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