Hot answers tagged

39

First of all, looking at the reviews for Osteria da Nico on Tripadvisor, regrettably you fell prey to a tourist trap. Regarding your question on pricing by weight: such is typical for foods such as meat (e.g. a steak) or especially seasonal fish but very untypical for regular courses (such as e.g. a Pizza). You can find the menu of a reputable Italian ...


22

Rent an apartment hotel (serviced apartment) or an Airbnb apartment instead. These always include kitchens and basic cooking utensils. Also, in Hong Kong you can trust product labeling: if commercial baby food says "no dairy" on it, it won't contain any dairy.


20

Google reverse image search says that it might be Feldkirch, Vorarlberg. Indeed the church and the first house in the foreground (the one with the two windows underneath the straight part of the roof) seem to be the ones in the picture below from Wikipedia: File:Feldkirch3.jpg, Wikimedia Commons, CC by SA 3.0 Google maps places it here. By precise ...


14

Cook anything in hotel room with our pressure cooker and/or with our induction stove. Standard at pretty much every hotel around the world. Fire hazard. Don't allow their restaurant' kitchen for this 5 minute cooking thing. Standard at pretty much every restaurant around the world. Health, safety, fire etc. Are you familiar with a commercial gas ...


12

No, robots wouldn't even know what a tip was, and you'd not tip at McDonald's even staffed by humans.


10

In the US, tipping is usual (and expected) in so called full service restaurants; meaning you sit down directly and order at a table with the server. No tips are usual (but of course allowed and liked) in half-service restaurants, those are restaurants where you order yourself at a central desk, sit down, and your food is brought to your table by the server....


9

It's feldkirch. I live near there. (It's the view from the schattenburg, the blue "hypo" sign in both pictures is the same sign)


9

Paying tips to the waiter or the hotel staff is always appreciated and never considered offensive in Iran. Although I would expect most waiters to accept the tip, be advised there is a complicated system among Iranians called Taarof (Tarof, Taroof), of which any tourist visiting Iran should be aware. Read this post to get a grasp of it: Iranian Taxi ...


8

Here's a site showing various electronic devices and a manual solution (test strips) that seems to solve your problem: https://mysugr.com/diet-drink-really-diet-check-sugar/ 100 test strips for $25 with the suggestion that you can cut them in half to last longer. That would probably last you a few trips and give you peace of mind. Here's another (old) site ...


6

Call the number and make a reservation. If you can't find the number then here's the information that TripAdvisor has on the venue: The Fat Duck High St, Bray, West Berkshire SL6 2AQ, United Kingdom 00441628580333


5

Using your cited vend-o-matic "restaurant", I would hazard a guess that the card swipe / authorization process is simply sale and does not offer a tipping option. Encouraging folks to "tip" a vending machine would likely not be viewed favorably by the buying public. Taking the automated restaurant further, to where robots are taking your order tableside, ...


5

for cheaper alternatives try a youth hostel: http://www.hostelworld.com/hostels/Hong-Kong/Hong-Kong But be sure to verify that it is a licensed Guest House. You're supposed to prepare your own food in most of these hostels, so it should be exactly what you want. Also, avoid Chungking Mansions at all costs which is reserved for adventurers.


5

For practically any train route in Russia where important long-distance trains pass and at all stations where they stop for more than ten minutes, you can expect an army of babooshkas to be waiting, selling their self-made food. In my experience (travelling Moscow–Sludyanka and back), what they sell is pretty good both in taste and in price. So these are ...


4

Depending on how much preparation you need to do. My advice is to use the local 7-Eleven or Circle K convenience stores. The vast majority of them will come equipped with a boiling water tap and a microwave. You will also find that you will never be more than a few paces from the nearest convenience store. We don't like to walk in Hong Kong, because its ...


4

In the past it was not common to pay tip but now it's OK. Especially in Tehran (capital city of Iran). Of course if you want to tip a waitress you should be careful a little more because its rare yet but it doesn't mean that you cant tip a waitress. It's easy to tip, go to him, give him a thanks for good service and pay the tip! I personally put the tip on ...


3

I found this recently and it gives a good set of tips. Basically it answers the question the other way around. Not how to find a good restaurant but how to avoid a bad one. One kf the most intersting is the one that relates the quality of the menu print with restaurant quality. There are several intersting tips: http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/...


3

This is a concept that simply does not exist (at least not in widespread form) in Europe, and if it did exist, it probably would not be popular. While the USA has many people who love being spoiled by services (e.g. getting your groceries delivered to your car instead of taking them there yourself; getting your dinner delivered to your car instead of having ...


2

First, you need to know that a lot of restaurants aren't serving home cooked meals. Having said that, a recent law was set about this and now, the restaurants have to clearly write which meals are home made. It is called "fait maison". So if you see for instance : "tout ici est fait maison", then it means that all the meals are home made. You will also see ...


2

It's Melech HaFelafel on the corner of King George and Agripas. (And has been there for decades).


2

I ate at a very swank New York City café (located in the Neue Gallerie) and the suggested tip calculation was way, way off in the restaurant's favor. I wrote the Consumer Protection Bureau, never heard back. Check the calculation of the tip, required or not.


2

I used to use Foursquare for that purpose frequently and it never let me down. Recently however, it seems that the user ratings cannot be trusted anymore (biased, falsified etc.). There were some 9+ star restaurants I visited in different cities and was totally disappointed with both the quality of the food and the price (aka tourist trap). So, I usually ...


1

I doubt this has anything to do with customs. 'Thank you' in English means acceptance, whereas in Polish - denial. If someone asks you if you want something and you say 'thank you' as an answer in English, it means you want it, but, in Polish, it means that you don't. Consider: Would you like a cup of coffee? Thank you. In English: I want the coffee. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible