Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Like the other answers here say, there's really no age limit for people to be out on the street, and as the night wears on on it gets so hectic and full of people that Times Square, the busiest, most crowded block in NYC becomes literally un-walkable! So there's no age requirement for just "standing on Times Square" but I wouldn't be surprised if ...


5

For just watching the ball drop and the festivities taking place in Times Square from within Times Square there is no age minimum. You just show up and go through all the police barricades to the "pen" where they put you. You cannot leave and return to the same place, if you leave you have to go to the latest "pen" the police set up. It's quite chaotic ...


12

It very much depends where you want to be for the drop. Supernova hosts a party which is technically in Times Square, just high up, and ages 18+ may attend, or 16+ with an adult. The Times Square Family Pass lets a family of any ages, although drinks will differ depending on age. Also you'd need to be with your family, presumably. The Wikihow article also ...


10

UK National Rail Conditions of Carriage Restrictions Any Train Company may refuse to accept an item of luggage, an article, an animal or a cycle, even though it meets the requirements set out in Condition 47 and 48 and Appendix B, if, in the opinion of its staff: (a) it may cause injury, inconvenience or a nuisance or it may cause ...


3

Places like that you change in your room and wear a bathrobe or shirt or sarong or just simply wrap your towel around you. Do the same when you head back to your room, though drying off a bit before leaving the pool area is a polite thing to do ;-)


3

Hopefully these will help you. Flying is by far the safest way to get around, so you should try to calm yourself and enjoy the experience! Airbus A320: Wifi - yes, above 10,000 ft. Power socket - No. CRJ 700: WiFi - No Power socket - No Q400: WiFi - No Power socket - No 737-900: WiFi - No Power socket - Yes (but its shared) For cell phones, ...


1

Well, if the airlines change their policies, remove restrictions and make the tickets transferable, this would create a whole new market niche for resellers. If this happen there would be many complications related to liability of the resellers, quality guarantees, safety rules and more. It would be virtually impossible for the airlines to operate within the ...


3

It is impossible for anyone to accurately answer the question without seeing your mother. The rules are based on how well she fits in the seat in question and whether the seat belt fits her. United rules are spelled out on: http://www.united.com/web/en-US/content/travel/specialneeds/customersize/default.aspx But the two biggest factors, can she fit into ...


4

Airlines aren't just in the business of selling "tickets" to seats. They are selling tickets to seats on different days. It's the "different days's" part that means that the same seat will sell for a lower price "in advance" and a higher price closer to the flight date. If you could re-sell the ticket to a friend, you could (theoretically) get the advantage ...


3

https://www.gov.uk/duty-free-goods/arrivals-from-outside-the-eu You can bring in goods worth up to £390 duty-free.


2

I realize there's already an accepted answer about "yield management" but, while their price discrimination strategy certainly exacerbates their rationale, I think that misses the point. I think the bigger reason is quite simply that they can get away with it. Let me expand on that. When most people book an airline ticket it's because they're planning to ...


1

Another reason might be that airlines tend to overbook planes, if they can. They expect a certain percentage of passengers to cancel their flight and want to prevent empty seats. If everyone found a replacement, there would not be enough seats on the plane for everyone!


1

Transfers can be two ways. If they have to register the transfer then of course they should be able to control the flow of cash. HOWEVER, if they don't register it, as for example might the situation if I gave you my bus ticket then, apart from the economic factors, there are clearly a few accountability and safety factors. If the plane crashes for some ...


4

This may result in an abuse situation. You can think that a non-registered travel group bought so many tickets with different names on a certain flight, then start selling the tickets but for larger price. Unchangeable tickets will get rid of this situation and only registered travel companies can have legal deals with the airlines.


3

I think what Relaxed meant by "non-changeable fares" is tickets that are only valid for one specific flight at a given time and date and cannot be rebooked (or only for a considerable fee). Price-sensitive passengers will book those fares, but other passengers (mostly business) are willing to pay much higher fares for the luxury of not having to worry about ...


8

Another factor--sometimes life happens and you can't fly. In the old days you could simply sell your ticket to someone else, now you either have to eat a hefty change fee or lose it outright. That's money in their pockets that they didn't used to get.


1

All that matters to the US is that you leave before your 90 days has expired, with the caveat that going to Canada and returning is not considered "leaving". For example, if you are in the US for 80 days and then Canada for 7 days, then you have a remaining 3 days (80 + 7 + 3 = 90) to depart the US. Note that you may depart the US by going to Canada and ...


-3

Travelot is arguably wrong. If not, there wouldn't be over 300 free photos of the Eiffel Tower here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Eiffel_Tower_at_night The copyright owners would long since have formally demanded that wikipedia take them down, and they'd be long gone. In terms of what tour-effel.fr says, Relaxed is right. Would-be ...


120

Airlines have a pricing strategy known as "yield management" or "revenue management" - they charge less for some seats than others, and expect these seats to be bought a long time in advance. They know that only a certain percentage of their customers are able to buy seats well in advance, and that those customers wouldn't fly if they couldn't get ...


5

Passportinfoguide has a surprisingly vague answer, but it does appear that it's about as specific as you might get, as many countries' embassies don't provide this information. From the page: There is no short answer that applies to every traveler. The requirement varies from country to country. If you have (4) blank pages then you are probably ...


3

Note: this answer is a bit speculative, based on general economic principles rather than any specific knowledge about the airline industry. But I think your question may be based on the sunk cost fallacy. My understanding is that counter space is allocated to airlines as part of their lease agreements with the airport, and that these are fairly long-term ...


10

Check in counter and aircraft parking gates at airports are usually provided in as copious quantity as is possible for the space. This allows for maximum usage during peak arrival/departing times slots and allows space for expansion in terms of number of flights/airlines serving the airport. Airlines that make frequent flights to an airport tend to have ...


1

Not sure if this is useful, but based on experience I would say that someone the size of your mother will be fine. My girlfriend is 5'4" and almost 450lbs right now, and she is just getting to the point where a second seat is truly necessary--up until recently she could squish (albeit uncomfortably) and with the courtesy of the other passengers and a ...



Top 50 recent answers are included