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210

I will answer this with a very long answer, since aviation safety is my day to day job. The window shade opening is a part of a long process to prepare the cabin for sudden (unexpected) emergencies. Why is that? Well, cabin crew have only 90 seconds to evacuate all passengers in case of emergencies. The process of evacuation itself should not take more than ...


120

Airlines have a pricing strategy known as "yield management" or "revenue management" - they charge less for some seats than others, and expect these seats to be bought a long time in advance. They know that only a certain percentage of their customers are able to buy seats well in advance, and that those customers wouldn't fly if they couldn't get ...


43

I found this article. Loosely translated: Station Schiphol disallows balloons since recently. The reason for this is that it has happened a few times last year that a kid's ballon hit the overhead power lines, often resulting in smoke and smouldering particles. Because the smoke alarm is very sensitive, because of safety concerns with the long train ...


40

Yes, TRUE. A good Canadian friend of mine had a Chicago cubs (u.s. baseball team) tattoo on his right arm. Kind of silly, but apparently any tattoo has yakuza (Japanese mafia) undertones, which makes many Japanese, especially older people, uncomfortable. Attitudes seem to be changing and I even knew a few younger Japanese with tattoos, but the perception ...


39

There are a few things you have to consider. I worked before at a hotel refilling those minibars. So I know a bit of how it works. Some hotels have an electronic system. This system registers if something has been taken from the minibar. Please note them some people replace a can of coke (or take it out and after putting it back) and the system will see ...


34

This is prohibited for safety reasons. Each row has one extra oxygen mask (there are exceptions, some rows have no extra masks and they will be marked somehow). If more than one infant is seated in a parent's lap and the oxygen masks were to be used one of the row occupants will have no oxygen mask to use. Usually the reservation system/agents will avoid ...


33

Tattoos or Irezumi as they are called in Japanese were criminalized in the beginning of the Meiji period (some time after 1868) as a way to make a good impression on the west. (A bit ironic in this case...) It was legalized again after the war in 1948 but still retains its image of criminality. For many years, traditional Japanese tattoos were ...


31

It sounds pretty similar to museums. Copyright isn't actually an issue for old works and should not concern the museum in any case (if some work is copyrighted, that's your problem if you do publish a reproduction, the museum does not need to enforce it on behalf of others). This leaves several potential reasons: Avoiding people standing in the way/slowing ...


29

The reason why airlines implement a policy of asking overweight people to get two seats is an air safety issue of whether they can be strapped in properly. The guideline used for this is whether a passenger can fit between the armrests. If a passenger requires two seats, then the policy differs from airline-to-airline if/what the passenger should be charged ...


27

Many of the major airlines do have self-service checkin machines at the airport. I know KLM, allows printing forgotten or failed prints. If your airlines does not have these self service machines, and you are not yet at the airport, try going to a print or copyshop. Most airports these days have these shops, but sometimes they can have quite some waiting ...


27

A few reasons: a final sanity check that you didn't walk down the wrong corridor. Some gates have two 'legs'. Or you could have snuck on or something. On larger planes, to see what aisle you should walk down. Otherwise people will randomly choose one and spend time climbing over seats and getting in the way. They're on a time schedule, and want you ...


27

Your question has both legal, but perhaps more important, also moral aspects. Generally speaking, when airborne, an aircraft is subject to the legislation of the carrier's home country. So far so good. I am not sure if medical doctors according to US law is both legally required to help in an emergency and liable to damages they inflict even if practicing ...


26

As far as I know, there is not such a world-wide standard, however there is an EU regulation. From www.europe.eu: A prescription delivered by a doctor in your country is valid in all EU countries. However, medicine prescribed in one country might not be available in another, or it may bear another name. As of 25 October 2013 you are able to ask ...


23

Firstly, good on you for being concerned about her and asking about it on a public forum where others who may not be able to can hopefully benefit from this as well. I hope you come back with your findings from the airlines/trips they take! Basically, it comes down to the airline. You can see what their policy is by looking up their Conditions of ...


22

I am 6'3" and pushing 400 pounds and I have never had a problem on BA flights. Yes I need a seatbelt extension but only so I will be comfortable. I admittedly do fit between the armrests. I do feel bad for people next to me because my shoulders are quite broad but I try to get an aisle seat so I can at least lean out. Since your mother is travelling with ...


22

Think about what your luggage goes through from the time you check it until you get it back. It travels on automatic conveyor belts. In many situations, it must be shunted from one conveyor belt to another. This is done by machines, not humans. The machines cannot see the "fragile" tag. It is moved from conveyor-belt to dolly by a human. The human may, or ...


21

Technically, they are not permitted in-flight. Bluetooth is a form of wireless communication, and all wireless communication is banned during airborne operations by the FCC and the FAA. As mentioned by @AnkurBanerjee in this post, FAA Advisory Circular 91.21-1B covers this regulation.


21

I would say this is mostly for safety reasons. The EASA states the following: PED stowage should be considered during critical phases of flight and taxiing to prevent possible injuries from projectiles and to allow for egress from the aircraft. Operators should ensure compliance with AMC1 CAT.OP.MPA.160. Operators should clearly identify the ...


21

No, there is no regulation that obliges airlines to provide free food during the normal operation of flights. However, in the EU they do have to provide free "meals and refreshments in a reasonable relation to the waiting time" when a flight is delayed by more than two to four hours (depending on the length of the flight).


20

The other two answers pretty well covered things, but here are a few more notes: In some states, it is legal to make a left turn through a red light if both intersecting streets are one way. (In other words, one can treat the red light as a stop sign.) In some (maybe all?) states, one can be ticketed for driving too slow, even if there is no posted ...


20

Required under certain conditions: Outside populated areas: Italy, Hungary and Romania Indicated roads only: Portugal Motorcycles only: Belgium, France, Spain Recommended: Germany, Spain, France Required at all times: Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Iceland, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Montenegro, Norway, ...


20

Mount Athos, in Greece, does not permit women to enter. Wikipedia explains the rationale behind this prohibition as Monks feel that the presence of women alters the social dynamics of the community and therefore slows their path towards spiritual enlightenment. However, you may want to refine your question. For example, most restrooms are divided on ...


20

I used to 'get around this' technicality by asking at the info desks at airports where there might be a power point to charge my laptop etc, even if I'd spotted some. They'd usually helpfully point out one, or say 'oh just use any you find'. That way I figured I'd be able to argue being covered if it came down to security yelling at me or worse. I've also ...


19

Sometimes it is due to delays, we did some tours of old buildings in Turkey, due to the weak floors they would only allow a limited number of people in at a time. The next tour could not go in until all the people from the current tour had left. The tour guild made it clear that no photos should be taken, as it slows down the tour too much. Even so, some ...


18

In Japan, tattoos are not a fashion statement, they are a visual mark of being a member of the yakuza and thus a social outcast. So "No tattooed people allowed" really means "we don't want the mafia on our premises". Most Japanese are probably aware that tattoos nowadays have rather different connotations in western countries, but they're not going to make ...


18

You're a little off, but if you Google for ETOPS you'll find the details on what you're referring to. In short, twin-engine planes (eg, 737, 767, 777, A320, A330, etc) were originally required to remain at all times within 60 minutes of a suitable airport where they could land. This was done so that in the event of an engine failure they could land as soon ...


18

Actual practice varies widely by country, but there are (at least) four reasons why hotels frown on having more guests in a room than you originally told them. Fire code. Hotels and rooms are rated for maximum occupancy: if they get busted for having two people in a room for one, or (worse) 101 guests in a hotel rated for 100, there are serious legal ...


17

My personal view is that it's easier to ask forgiveness than permission. Most people working there won't give a rat's * about you using a powerpoint, save perhaps for security, but at most they'll just tell you to move along. I do a lot of travel, airports, bus stations, train stations, and my eye is always looking subconciously for power sockets now ;) ...


17

What you're describing is called an "Open Jaw" ticket, and there's a very simple rule for determining if it applies or not. Lets say you're flying A-B and then C-A. There's 3 distances involved here - A-B, B-C (ie, the overland segment) and C-A. For a ticket to be a valid "open jaw", the distance B-C needs to be shorter than both A-B and C-A. eg, SFO-STL ...


17

The following is US specific, but I think this is followed the world over. If you ever got to apply for a US visa and in case you don't have a first name or a last name, the US consulate will consider your entire name as your last name and mention FNU (First Name unavailable) in the first name field. It should not cause any problem as it seems to be a ...



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