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19

Ramadan is the 9th month of the Islamic year, it can be 29 or 30 days (as every other month in this lunar calendar). Usually this is determined by visual observation of the moon in the 29th of the month, if the moon was observed then the month is 29 days, if not then the month will continue to 30 days. FYI, this is why the crescent is considered the symbol ...


14

Nobody eats during the daytime until the sun goes down (that's a sure thing), This is true, and Morocco is one of the strictest countries in this regard! Unlike Tunisia, Lebanon or Syria for example. So, no shop (included food shops) are opened until then (with hard temperatures...), and every streets are kind of desert in the afternoon, Not ...


14

Having been to both during Ramadan: In all reasonably touristy areas in Thailand, including the southern resort islands, you basically will not notice Ramadan at all -- pretty much everything is open as usual. Malaysia, though, is a different story. While you certainly can get drinks and food, most places that stay open do so a little discreetly, with ...


14

Short answer: Yes, you will get in trouble. And I personally don't recommend public drinking in any Arabic/Islamic country. It is even illegal in many other countries. Long answer is that there are a lot of details to know about drinking law rules in Dubai. By the way, Ramadan is a single month per lunar year. It was in August 2011, it will be in July ...


8

The situation in Indonesia is very similar to Malaysia, and I'll quote my own answer to another question, with minor tweaks when applicable: While you certainly can get drinks and food, most places that stay open do so a little discreetly, with curtains on the windows etc, and you'll want to show respect to people who are fasting by not eating, ...


8

Ramadan Dates Ramadan occurs in the ninth lunar month of the Islamic calendar. It's start and end thus depend on the moon phases. Moreover the lunar calendar is 10-11 days shorter than the solar calendar, hence Ramadan never falls on the same dates over two consecutive years. Indeed it is anticipated by 10-11 days every year. This means that the dates can ...


7

If you travel to the major cities, like Marakech, Fes, Casablanca and Rabat, you will barely notice any change. But in smaller towns, there is a huge impact of Ramadan on the population. Tourists restaurants, caf├ęs and shops will still be open as normal, transportation is available as normal, and all tourits attraction will be open until like 16h00. Only ...


6

I have returned from my trip and would like to share some of my insight. The other answers here are similar to what I experienced so I thought it would be useful to share additional information that I wish I had known before traveling. Note that I stayed in the Dubai Marina area which has many more Westerners than older parts of the city (such as Deira) and ...


6

During Ramadan, the shopping malls will be open (you can get some respite from the heat there), however: No food establishments are open until after sunset; this includes hotel bars, restaurants, etc. You are not allowed to eat, drink or smoke in public (this applies to everyone, with the exception of children). There are extended prayers during the ...


6

I would not personally travel to Morocco during this time, based on my experience in traveling in Muslim countries (actually during Ramadan, by mistake and more than once). I would be OK with going to Turkey but I would not go to Morocco. First, you're not just traveling during Ramadan, you're traveling on the last week. Which after a month of daytime ...


6

As far as I know there's designated areas for non-nationals to drink. Ramadan is only for Muslims; but, they fast from morning to night, so, finding local food might be more difficult :).


5

In Thailand, it depends on where you'll be going. Anywhere from Bangkok northwards, you won't notice anything in relation to Ramadan. There's a significant muslim presence in the south of Thailand (the sliver of land that borders Malaysia), but I don't know to what extent Ramadan celebrations there spill over into public life. Malaysia is religiously ...


4

I'm from Bosnia. I myself never partake in Ramadan and I've never had any serious troubles. As you said yourself, Bosnia has a large non-Muslim presence throughout the whole country. Many Muslims don't fast during Ramadan as well. Some just choose not to, but some can't because of illness, pregnancy, old age or physical work/exercise etc. On top of that, ...


3

If you are a tourist there are many places to drink in Dubai - I guess it depends what you mean by in public. I have been there many times and drunk in bars, at poolside in my hotel etc - but these are areas that are quite westernised. I wouldn't expect to find an alcoholic drink in a mall or drink on the street. Even during Ramadan, the rules in western ...


3

My thoughts on this topic available on personal blog http://www.glowhunters.com/visiting-sarajevo-during-ramadan-and-bayram/ Would be happy if you visit and leave your comment. Blog is in preparation of much more touristic reviews of Balkans and whole Western Europe. But still, Sarajevo has a special role as this is my home town...So be welcomed to sneak ...


3

The Same Rules Apply to Both Locals and Foreigners The rules seem to be very simple: no eating, drinking, smoking or chewing gum in public during Ramadan in Dubai. This applies to both tourists and locals. Fines and (possibly) jail time are the common punishment for such offenses. Quoting from Dubai FAQs: Rules and expectations specific to Dubai and the ...


1

During Ramadan, the most important change is the islamic fasting. This prohibits eating and drinking between (approximately) sunrise and sunset. However, some muslims are allowed to eat. This includes children, the sick, the old, and pregnant women. I have no special experience with Indonesia, but typically (even with Sharia in place), you will be able to ...


1

Following my recent experience in Java. I only stayed a couple of days in Java during the Ramadan, but I think it gave me a good introduction to this special time of the year for the Muslims of Indonesia. Basically, it was much more easy going than I thought, we did not feel a huge difference before and after the start of the Ramadan. It might have been a ...



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