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20

I was in Montreal a few months ago, and I was worried about this. I tried my best to learn some French through podcasts (Coffee Break French - I really liked Coffee Break Spanish), but I still felt like I was floundering. Be aware though, that just 10 words can get you very far, if they're the right words. Hello, Goodbye, Please, Thank you, Yes, No, ...


11

To answer your question, it is useful but not that important. You are correct in saying that the majority of people in Montreal understand English. The majority also understand French too. You will also find that there are many people who live here which speak neither of these languages and have been in Montreal for a decade or more! You should be prepared ...


11

I was there (and Quebec City) back in March. I knew a few basic words in French, and I think most people like it when you respond in the same language as them. I generally responded in my mangled French, they'd usually smile and without asking, switch to English to communicate with me. No fuss, no question, they'd just change. Very hospitable. Basically, ...


8

I have no first-hand experience, but taking the train looks like a nice option. The trip takes slightly more than 3 hours, and quoting Via Rail's schedule page, there are "five departures every weekday from both Montréal and Québec City, and three departures on Saturdays and Sundays". It looks like baggage allowance won't be a problem either. Regarding ...


7

I wouldn't say it's a faux pas though perhaps a small minority of people there might regard it as such. But since you know some French, I highly recommend you practice it and switch to English at the point you feel your French won't hold up well enough to further the conversation. I do this wherever I travel, starting with "hello" in the language then ...


6

What you are doing is fine and common practice. Most people here, including myself who has been living in Montreal 15 years, just keep going with the language being spoken. So, if you switch to English, most staff will follow in English too. If they cannot, which does happen from time to time, they will respond back in French. Just keep the conversation slow ...


5

The Fédération québécoise de la marche, a non-profit that promotes hiking in Quebec, lists shelters on its site and Facebook page (http://www.fqmarche.qc.ca/ and https://www.facebook.com/pages/F%C3%A9d%C3%A9ration-qu%C3%A9b%C3%A9coise-de-la-marche/138582999548977).


4

A simple rule: check the weather regularly, and find a place to stay before it starts snowing. Once the storm is over, the road crews will have the highways cleared within a few hours. And if you wait until traffic starts to crawl, you will probably find that there's no place to stay. While people from northern states like to think of themselves as ...


4

I know that the question is bit old but I feel my answer can be useful for other users. Since you are willing to go as far as Tadoussac, I will recommend two other parks: Parc national des grands jardins (2h15 from Quebec-City) Parc national des hautes gorges de la rivière Malbaie (2h30 from Quebec-City) I will recommend the Pioui trail at the Grand ...


4

Only thirty minutes outside of Quebec City there are scenic hiking trails where you feel like you are miles away from civilization. The hiking trails at Jacques-Cartier National Park range from trails for the most experienced hikers to climb to the top of the mountain. Jacques-Cartier National Park is located just thirty minutes north of Quebec City. It is ...


4

There is no standard cancellation policy (I don't think this is regulated even in Europe). Some hotels allow you to cancel for free till 24h in advance, others 48h, some require a week, and with certain offers, you cannot cancel at all. It is therefore very important to read the fine print on the home page to figure out the specific policy. As a personal ...


4

My goto tool for B&B anywhere in Canada is BBCanada.com. It has a huge range of B&Bs all over the country (77 in Quebec City alone - BedAndBreakfastWorld has 7, two of which are motels). They are divided by region, and often down to different areas of the same city. I've never had a bad experience with any B&B I've booked through them, and many ...


3

Part of the Hostelworld group is BedAndBreakfast World, which is a good search engine for searching B&Bs. It itself has ratings and reviews you can go through to decide what the place is going to be like. In addition to that, many (most?) B&Bs are often also listed on TripAdvisor so you should look reviews there too. You say that B&B ratings are ...


3

Unfortunately there is no pass at the moment. RoutPass disappeared after 2012. Since it was offered several bus companies in the network were taken over by multi-national transportation companies, services have since been, and continue to be, restructured and moved between operators especially in Quebec and the Maratimes. At Busbud we're building a search ...


3

One of our (Australia) local travel agents has a page on Canadian bus passes, and it only lists western Canada as having them: With circuits in Western Canada (Vancouver side) and Eastern Canada (Toronto side), Canada's bus network has itineraries to suit just about anyone’s needs. Passes in Western Canada have frequent departures and all feature ...


3

I'll answer for the Québec part of it since I'm a local: The 15 will be much quicker but route 133 which we call Route des Patriotes here is very nice and you could take it up to Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu if coming from Vermont. And try not to get to Montreal at traffic hour, it can take quite a while to get on the island.


3

It's a matter of preference, the Vermont route is a little bit faster, though a little plain in my opinion. I prefer the NY route because the scenery varies, you get to see mountains (Adirondacks) and lakes, the road isn't just a straight stretch and there are plenty of rest areas and service stops. The 87 becomes the 15 in Quebec which is a highway. Those ...


3

Generally speaking American and Canadian roads are fairly well cared for in the winter. Interstates and Autoroutes even more so than smaller rural roads. The only time I'd be worried (I live in the greater DC/Northern Virginia area) about making that trip, even in my own Mustang, is during an actual snow storm/blizzard. Even then, I'm originally from ...


3

Unless your driving in a snow storm, the road are usually we cared. For the Autoroutes in Quebec, check the Quebec511 website. It will give you the road condition, visibility condition and any problem, like road closure, in real time. For added safety, you should put winter tire on your car, it will give you a better adherence to the road. Also be sure to ...


3

I don't think taking I-87 is going to be a serious consideration for a trip between Montreal and Boston. It's on the wrong side of Lake Champlain, so you'll have to go far out of your way and extend your trip by an hour or more. The route taken by Greyhound is essentially identical to the first option given by Google Maps for a trip between Montreal and ...


2

Telus appears to have good 3G and some 4G coverage (search for G0E) of Gaspé and the roads leading around the outside of the peninsula, but no provider appears to have any significant coverage of the provincial park or most of the interior. I checked several other providers, but coverage was even worse. If I had to have a phone, I would go with Telus, but ...


2

In the United States and Canada there are two different, and incompatible, cell phone technologies: GSM (which uses SIM cards) and CDMA (which does not). Both are being replaced by LTE (a SIM-card-based technology often marketed as "4G", although its adherence to the 4G standard is limited and thus its use of the term "4G" is controversial). Without knowing ...


2

There may be a lot of snow, and expect some snow anyway. I remember doing a similar trip around Christmas 2010. There was a big snowstorm right after Christmas and almost no bus would drive us from Philadelphia to New York, and some friends doing it by car were slowed down because of it. Anyway, Quebec City has a lot of snow anyway (you can see the snow ...


2

I could not find a centralised list of all community shelters in Quebec. However, I could list some organisations that manage shelters and list some of those along a small portion of the Trans-Canada trail (Sentier National in Quebec), from Mont-Tremblant to the reserve Mastigouche. I list them in the order West-East. For each shelter, I try to list the ...


2

As long as you're being polite, it's fine. There are plenty of American tourists there (arrogant and otherwise), and it is (semi?)officially bilingual. (Not quite - See @Zonata's comment/link) It is an opportunity to use your French a little, but you will be understood by (almost) everyone in English. Even if you were fluent in both, you'd be switching ...



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