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9

You only need a visa (or visa waiver) to enter the United States. Once you are admitted, you can legally remain in the US for as long as you remain "in status". Since Puerto Rico is part of the United States, it is treated purely as domestic travel. So you do not need a visa to travel between the mainland and Puerto Rico, provided you are still in status. ...


6

From the US embassy in London but presumably applicable to your situation: If you wish to pursue practical training through an internship with a U.S. based employer you will require either an exchange visitor (J-1) or trainee (H-3) visa. Such activities cannot be conducted on a B-2 visa or visa free under the Waiver Program, even if you will receive no ...


4

Yes you do need to clear immigration and customs in Atlanta. But on the brightside Atlanta's immigration area is fairly large and well manned, so processing time is not too bad. While as a US citizen I go through a different line, I have seen foreign nationals from my flights awaiting their baggage same time as me, so they have obviously made it through ...


3

Doesn't sound legal under VWP. J-1 is usually used for that sort of thing.


1

Your student status would be unaffected if your flight has to make an emergency landing in another country. Nor would it be if you travelled there yourself. People in the US on student visas (F and J) do not need a valid visa to re-enter the US under the automatic revalidation scheme, if they traveled to Canada, Mexico, or certain Caribbean islands, for a ...


1

It's domestic, period, so no passport control. Never heard of CBP officials doing spot checks for flights to/from Puerto Rico but if they do, you could explain your Status to them in case you don't bring your passport. They will be able to check it out Btw, once you get your Green card it's all you need even when entering the US from overseas. For example ...



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