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51

Rent the car! Los Angeles is built for cars. It has some of the worst public transportation imaginable, ever since General Motors conspired to eliminate the city's trolley system. Yes, there are busses and taxis, but you will find that busses take forever (and get stuck in the same traffic), and taxis are hard to find and expensive. Only 11% of Los Angeles ...


30

Airport transportation is expensive because it can be. The price isn't included in the facility charges because public transport facilities are rarely under the same management as the airport terminals are, and their interests are not necessarily in sync with each other or with passengers. Travelers are captive. In Washington, the bus agency (WMATA) raised ...


27

I've been living in the LA area (in Long Beach, exactly) for 7 months, being there for studying abroad. I made the choice of not buying a car and solely relying on public transit. Well... as said earlier, LA is clearly made for cars. Most busses don't take the freeways and move rather slowly. It depends on which route and which agency. Also, even if Metro ...


23

If you're only going to be travelling within London (i.e. not starting outside of London, and not visiting outside of London), then by far and away your best bet is an Oyster Card. TFL have a very good website on the Oyster Card, with details of how to get one. They also have a dedicated Visitors to London section including a handy intro video. One of the ...


23

Won't using U1 be faster and easier? Yes - but Google Maps doesn't know about it. Apparently the public transit data in Germany is based exclusively on a cooperation with Deutsche Bahn (which operates the S-Bahn). Other public transit (including regional trains not operated by DB) are not taken into account. They may eventually expand their data base ...


22

OK, I can answer a good part of this. From Europe, you can get into Russia fairly simply with a visa - tourist visa is for 1 month max, however, which is a bit limiting (maybe not for you, but it was for me). From there I went south and into Kazakhstan, across Uzbekistan, into Tajikistan. Afterwards I continued north - Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, back into ...


21

The cheapest, but especially most efficient way of transport to get around Paris is the Velib. You pay a fee of 1,70 EUR for a dayticket or 8 Eur for a week ticket. During the validity of this ticket you can use any bicycle from the velib network. Source: Wikimedia Commons The catch to really travel cheap is to change bikes every 30 minutes. If you cycle ...


20

I do recall Paris metro tickets being available on the Eurostar and at the information desk in London, but that was a few years ago and may well no longer be true. The price is rather more expensive than if you get them in Paris. There generally isn't that much of a queue in Paris Nord, especially outside peak hour. This is one of Paris's busiest stations ...


19

The metro is only €1,70 per ride, and if you buy a carnet of 10 the price is €13.30 for all 10. Probably your best bet. I hate cycling because of the issues with locking it up, worrying about theft, and if you're in the upper arrondissements going uphill on cobblestone sounds like a miserable experience I would rather spare myself from. The city is ...


18

I lived in DC/Northern VA area for the past four years. I can tell you riding Metro in the city is the way to go. Traffic in DC is very bad and on top of that the roads can be very very confusing for visitors. The worst part is probably the parking. During prime tourist hours, it's almost impossible to find one. I don't know which part of Maryland you'll be ...


18

Actually, the ones you've mentioned - they often have cheaper ways to get there, and in many cities the most common way is very cheap - it's not always expensive. In your London example, for half the price of the Gatwick Express you can take Southern Rail to get to the airport. EasyJet has an EasyBus from Fulham Broadway which will take you there, and can ...


17

In December at least it will be summer, so you can explore the entire country! Suggested cities and activities below: El Calafate, Patagonia - use as a base to go see the Perito Moreno glacier - the 3rd largest in the world, and the general area - great for hiking, climbing and trekking. The Andes are spectacular down there. Ushuia - the end of the ...


17

Having a car in Berlin is more hassle than a convenience, just because of the parking situation, and the money you spend on parking meters. Driving in Berlin is also not exactly fun with the traffic congestion, or much faster than the bus or subway either. Leave your car at home, save the money and then decide after 3 months if you really need a car in ...


16

Municpal bus 96T is probably the cheapest, at 3.00 lira (~$2 USD), but it takes very long (~1.5h at times) and is often packed. Havas bus is faster and costs 10 lira (~$6.50 USD). If you plan to use public transport a lot, buy the Akbil pass (saves a bit of money and you don't need to dig for coins all the time). The trip is also possible via metro, but ...


16

The two main public transportation are ACTV and Alilaguna. You have quite a few options Murano: from Piazzale Roma or from Venezia Santa Lucia train station, take the ACTV line 3. The trip takes 20 mins. You could also take line 4.2 but it takes almost 40 mins. From the airport you can reach Murano in 30 mins using the Alilaguna public transportation. If ...


16

I also vote for walking. You can save a little bit of time by being in the right part of the train, and then by avoiding a couple of annoyingly slow pedestrian crossings: Travel in the frontmost carriage if you can; that'll put you closest to the ticket barriers at Kings Cross. Get up and go to the doors as the train approaches the station. You want to ...


14

I have been to LA several times and have used different kinds of transportation: car, public transport, bicycle and walking. I experienced the city very differently depending on how I got around. I agree LA is a car city and I would recommend to drive around at least once to get a feel for it, but using a bike or walking is always better if you really want ...


14

Taxi Taxis don't have meters, so negotiate price before getting into one. Most hotels will be happy to arrange for a transfer, but it will most likely be pricier than getting a taxi. If you're going to popular tourist destinations, I would personally prefer to arrange transfer to avoid the hawks. Bus If you're traveling by bus, choose the right bus ...


14

The Schwebebahn in Wuppertal, Germany is a suspension railway first opened in 1901 and still in operation as a regular mass transit system. Each train can carry around 120 passengers, and a one-way ticket is 2.40 EUR. During rush hours there is one train every 3-4 minutes. There are a handful other (much newer) suspension railway lines in operation in ...


13

I may be biased because I grew up there, but I'm a big fan of the beaches around Christchurch, Bournemouth and Poole. There is 7 miles of continuous sand from Sandbanks (Poole), past Bournemouth and on to Hengistbury Head (Christchurch). From Sandbanks, head across the mouth of Poole Harbour on the chain ferry, then you've another 5 miles of sandy beach ...


13

Wikipedia seems to feel that even just stopping/not stopping at an official station is pretty rare and mentions only Canada as a place where you can stop "at any milemarker" on request. I can see this making sense North of Superior. Actually, I would love it when travelling between Oshawa and Montreal, since the train goes right past a place I would prefer ...


13

Without any research I would say the tube is the cheapest and fastest as well, because you don't have to change at all to get to Knightsbridge. The Transport For London website says the journey is 42 minutes. The Heathrow Express train, may take you faster into central London, but you have to change into the tube (District or Circle lines) at Paddington and ...


13

Like many other cities, the metros and regular buses stop at night (between midnight and 5am most nights). There is a different night bus network (NitBus) in Barcelona and its suburbs with 18 lines (N0 to N17). I believe that the fares and passes are the same as for the day buses.


12

With the possible exception of Niagara (Niagara Falls is a smaller, more tourist-oriented city, so the public transportation may be somewhat less comprehensive), all of the cities you listed should have extensive public transportation coverage. Most cities offer some form of unlimited travel pass, and in most cases a weekly pass is available. I think in ...


12

I am the Online Media Specialist for STL Metro, and I can see your point that rules and regulations may not have a cohesive home on the website. Are there specific questions I can answer for you? Basic riding rules including must have valid fare, no eating or drinking, no loud music, no pets except for service animals, no leaving your bags unattended.


12

No problems at all. The two countries are friends especially due to the pipeline bringing oil from Azerbaijan to Turkey via Georgia. Nationals of either country can visit the other without visas. Border crossings There are two active border crossings and I believe one inactive one. The main one is on the Black Sea coast and is very busy and has been ...


12

The Cambodian "bamboo train" is a nifty solution to a once-extensive railway that fell into disrepair during the country's lengthy civil wars. Take two pairs of wheels, plop them on a bamboo frame, tack on a dinky little engine and voila: (courtesy Noud W on flickr, CC by-nd) So what do you do when two of them meet? Dismantle the one carrying less ...



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