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2

After some time with Google, I believe the answer is no. There is no problem going inland via Sacramento, either by bus or train. I don't know Greyhound's stop-off policy. I believe with advance notice, Amtrak allows one. There are a great number of fine tourist attractions on that route, but it isn't what the OP asked for. Greyhound runs a service up 101 ...


3

For the first part of your journey, I'd suggest using the train. The Amtrak Cascades service runs between Vancouver and Eugene in Oregon: You can find their timetable on their website, but a few of the services are actually buses. I'd suggest trying for the train rather than the bus, as the views can be better! You can save some money by booking in ...


5

I will give you some practical reasons: Book now, pay later - this option is universally available at agents; very rarely available at the website. I use this all the time when I need to show a reservation (for example, as part of visa requirements) but do not want to commit to buying a ticket. Corporate accounts - a majority of agent's business is ...


12

The Internet was a game changer in many businesses and the travel agency world is no exception. Nowadays people can easily (this is arguable) find the cheapest price in a quick search; therefore, agencies need to present the best price to be able to sell since that's a key factor. How can they do this? (These are assumptions based on general commercial ...


1

Usually right now there is no such website, Some website seems to show various rate and compare option however not as much useful for people.I think better option will be you opt manually searching few most reputed website for this as they will be much beneficial as compared to the comparing ones. I am sure you will get the better search result and reviews ...


0

"Promoting a comment to an answer - it's actually really really complicated! There's a reason why even Google can't give you an answer quickly, and why multi-city quotes can take such an age to run...." This is of course not true. You can precalculate all routes. Google has enough machines to do this. The reason is that some companies have already solved ...


3

this is a very complex topic involving some very advanced CS algorithms and different factors. long scientific papers have been written on the subject. the simple explanation is that its a marketplace/ auction and prices are influenced by supply and demand. the basic price is related to airline costs such as equipment and fuel, taxes, airport fees. both ...


8

I've worked in airlines and the process is as follows: Airlines buy or rent some planes. They also have permits to flight at a given date and time over some route. They cannot just grab some plane and fly whenever and wherever they want. If a jet costs as much as USD 150 million, and in 24 hours they can fly it for only 15 hours, the rest of time it must ...


2

I believe Iceland has the most road (by length) per person meaning a little money has to go a long way in maintenance. And priority will be given to those roads that are totally impassable rather than just poorly maintained. Whilst technically being a road quite a bit of it is gravel track and full of pot holes. This will increase wear and tear on a car ...


3

Tips to rent for cheaper Last time I went I rented with SADCars. Compared to North American prices I still found it expensive, not to mention the horrifying price of gas (2.5CAD/L), but a much more palatable alternative to the more established companies. They rent some old cars with high mileage, some not very pretty, but mine did about 2000km without ...


8

'Expensive' is relative. That said, a quick search on https://book.cartrawler.com saw me get prices for under 500 euros for ten days. Still not very pleasant, but better than 1100 euros. Your question is really asking why Iceland is so expensive, as the relatively high cost of things in Iceland is not limited to just car rentals. Numbeo shows that the cost ...


4

There is no such set of rules. Period. Most airlines have a yield management department (sometimes called revenue management). The whole purpose of this department is to figure out how to set ticket prices to get the maximum revenue out of each flight. A lot of that is done manually (which is why they need a whole department for it, and often not a small ...


4

Just a simple (and possibly obvious) observation. Airlines want to make a profit. They have expenses for each passenger, slightly lower expenses for each empty seat, and income from each sold ticket. How much do they charge? As much as they think they can get away with. They must charge no more than the competition, and no more than the reservation price of ...


9

There are different ways to determine the price of a ticket and it depends on different factors. Every airplane has a different cabin(Y,Z,X,D...) and classes(first, business, economy...). Usually every cabin has a yield price, which is the amount of money the airline knows it has to make on every seat on that particular cabin to cover the operating costs. ...


12

Promoting a comment to an answer - it's actually really really complicated! There's a reason why even Google can't give you an answer quickly, and why multi-city quotes can take such an age to run.... The best explanation I've come across of why this is, what goes into the complexity, what work there is in finding out the prices etc is given in this ...


87

To calculate the price of a ticket, we first need to know a little about how air pricing works. A ticket is a single, complete contract for one journey. It can contain up to a maximum sixteen flights. Each flight on the ticket must be paid for ("covered") by exactly one fare. A fare is a price that the airline offers on a city-pair, for example, London-New ...


-3

I think cost of tickets depends on many different factors. Also unavailability of tickets complicates your journey where you want to travel. If tickets are available on those dates when you want to fly then you can visit different sites to get specific information of prices of different tickets available.


4

Imagine that you manage to sell all those seats 100% of the time. Wouldn't that mean that you're undercharging the market if that were the case? If the supply is meeting the demand perfectly, then it means you're either incredibly lucky, or much more likely it means that you're undercharging the market. Also, there is a second factor. The airline ...


6

Many people buy fully refundable flexible tickets because they are not sure of their travel plans until a day or two (or less) before the flight. Such tickets are about three to four times the price of the cheapest ticket in the same class of travel. If you are going to sell very cheap tickets a few hours before departure, many people holding full flex ...


8

There are several factors going on. Airlines have whole departments dedicated to revenue optimization, and to figure such things out. Among the factors that play a role here: Last minute fliers tend to be in some kind of urgent situation, and thus are more willing to pay higher fares. Airlines already have a contingent of people to fill empty seats: ...


31

There are many things that airlines used to do that they can no longer do because customers have so much more information than before. 30 years ago, what people presented themselves as doing pretty well matched with what they were doing. But over the years, folks have learned (and shared with others) how pretending can save a lot of money: one way ticket ...


8

Munich native again. Of course all tents serve typical Bavarian food. The food can be roughly divided into two categories: warm dishes and proper starters/desserts as served in any Bavarian restaurant and Brotzeit, a German/Bavarian classic consisting of bread or Brezn (pretzel) with various spreads, hearty toppings and often accompanied by some kind of ...



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