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29

Yes, seriously, although the US$65 "royalty" is actually included in the US$200 "daily package fee". However, that's the group rate (3 or more people), you get socked another $40/30 per person if you're traveling solo/duo, and another $50/night/person if you're visiting when it's neither midwinter nor monsoon (March-May, Sep-Nov). Bhutan explicitly wants ...


27

It's definitely not the same thing. There are two 'routes'. One is along the pedestrian walkway on the bridge. Same height as the traffic and trains. (source: Wikipedia) The other is over the 'arch' of the bridge, which is the one you pay $185 for. You get safety lines, can't take anything up with you (including cameras, I gather) and you have a guide. ...


21

For most journeys, only one train company can cover that route, so there's no comparison involved. For your journey from London to Newcastle-upon-Tyne, the only option is to use East Coast. When there are multiple companies, you can check using "National Rail Enquiries" which can search all the companies. A good example is London-Birmingham, for which ...


20

If you try and use the contactless Oyster twice in a row (ie to let a second person through on your card) for a trip from A to B, it'll error. You're required to touch out first before you can touch in again, and then the first person wouldn't be allowed to travel as they've touched out at A. Source: TFL official site: Number of people using an Oyster ...


14

One Person per Journey for all Contactless Methods To add on to @MarkMayo's answer, the same rules apply for payment across all contactless methods (Oyster and Contactless-card): you can pay for only one person per journey with contactless methods. Quoting from TFL's website on the topic: Touching in and out [...] Like Oyster, you can only pay ...


12

Two possibilities spring to mind. Coca Cola is produced by local partners, http://www.coca-colacompany.com/our-company/bottler-web-sites it is possible that the local partner in Indonesia does not have the space on its production line to make diet coke, which means that it would have to be imported, hence the higher price. The second thought that I had ...


12

For starters it is not a "minimum spend", rather it is the base rate per day for tours. It covers your government taxes, accommodation, three meals, guide services and transport. If you are doing some more specialized like white water rafting, climbing, etc there is a supplement. If you are wanting to stay in upscale hotels there is a supplement. The ...


11

You asked Why should the airline care if I depart on Tuesday and return Thursday of the same week, or the next week? and you answered: because business travelers will pay more. That's all there is to it. It's called price discrimination and it's practiced by just about any business that can get away with it -- all the more so in competitive ...


10

That's perfectly valid, as most sightseeing is in Zone 1. What you could do is buy a 7 day travel pass immediately at Heathrow (zone 1 and 2) which you put ONTO your Oyster Card. To explain - the Oyster is just a card. You then either top it up with pre-pay, or you put travel cards on to it. So step 1 - buy the card. Step 2 - get some prepay on it to ...


10

Unless you're an Indian, Bangladeshi or Maldivian citizen, you are unable to enter Bhutan without going through a Bhutanese tour agent - either directly or via a tour agent in your own country. You will not receive a visa otherwise. These tour agents are the ones that effectively "ensure" that you will meet the minimum spend as per Bhutanese tourist ...


9

I was in Sydney last year for a visit and thought about doing the Harbour Bridge walk. It's undoubtedly a great experience, but it's expensive and you're not allowed to take your own camera with you. I was advised instead to go to the Pylon Lookout (http://www.sydney.com.au/pylon-lookout.htm) which is a fraction of the cost at $AU 13, and also has a ...


8

The visa fee is one hundred and eight U.S. dollars ($108.00) for U.S. passport holders; for non-U.S. passport holders the fee is fifty-four U.S. dollars ($54.00) for a single entry and one hundred and thirty-four U.S. dollars ($134.00) for multiple entries. Requirements of travel visa is here Requirements of family visa is here


8

I went there solo for 5 days in 2007, as part of a backpacking trip, and it's like this: You contact a tour agent ("operator") and explain that you just want to see the sights for N days. (Many of their tourists hire porters for serious mountaineering.) You will be quoted the minimum rate of $200/day or whatever. If the rate is different or the reply ...


7

According to cheapair.com, the price starts to skyrocket 30 days before the departure date. Quoting it, [Within 29 days] the increase began to accelerate and once you were within 14 days the fares really shot up dramatically. Their graph:


7

One major drawback with using third party booking websites (especially for air) is that there is a time lag between when they queried the airline reservation system and when your booking request is submitted. During this time lag, the seat could be sold, the airline could load new fares, etc. When you search for fares, the airline systems return what is ...


6

There are a number of websites where you can check the evolution of fuel prices. Taking a random result from Google yields this one. With a rough daily price you can then use an online tool such as numbeo to compute and estimate of tour fuel consumption, using miles-per-gallon-type (mpg) metrics, and thus an average price for your roadtrip. The fuel ...


5

Based on this link, it seems to be just what it sounds like, a rate that another innkeeper would pay when staying there.


5

As a whole airfares do not increase, rather available fare classes sell out or become invalid. On average, a economy section can have 4 to 8 fare classes available, with a limited number of spaces available in each class. As the cheaper spaces get sold, then the reservation system shows the next higher fare that is still available. In years past, a fair ...


4

Wiki Voyage quotes it around 1200 TBH: Phi Phi officially has no motorised transport, though there are a few motorcycles with sidecars, usually used for goods and construction material transport. Transport on land is by foot or bicycle, but in the populated areas of Ton Sai, nowhere is more than about a ten minutes walk from anywhere else. ...


4

According to the website of the Stockholm public transport system: Tickets are available in full price, for adults, and reduced price, for children and young people under 20 years of age as well as for those over the age of 65. So it looks like you'll have to pay full price.


4

You've basically got three options in terms of ticketing it: Multi-city trip - A single ticket for UK to Washington, Washington to SF, SF back to the UK Open-Jaw + Single - One ticket for UK to Washington, back from SF to the UK (the "open jaw"), plus a single ticket from Washington to SF Two returns - A return ticket from the UK to Washington, then ...


4

In general the age you are when you fly is what counts AND that is both directions. As an example, if you are looking at a youth rate, the airline will look at your age on both legs and the fare will be based on the higher rate. ie if you fly out under a youth rate, but have a birthday and return as an "adult", then the entire airfare will be based on ...


4

There's no hard evidence in this thread on ThaiVisa.com, but it's clear something happened in 2008 (during which time Coke Light was nearly unavailable) that led to this differential. Speculation includes an attempt to drive purchases of Coke Zero, a production shortage, or simply a desire to raise prices.


4

I am afraid the answer is going to be “it depends”. With low cost airlines at least, the increase is gradual and it's not uncommon to see markedly lower prices for flights at inconvenient times. So a ticket on such a flight might still be available at a given price a week out whereas similar tickets for a more attractive flight on the same day disappeared a ...


4

No experience specifically with the UK, but in general, commissions paid to travel agents are both low and fixed, which makes negotiating a bit pointless. For example, if they sell you a $1000 flight ticket, they might get 2% ($20) as commission. Even if you manage to cut that in half through negotiation, they lose half their incentive, and you only save ...


4

I am not the expert on this matter, but I know a thing or two. Airlines sell tickets in advance (way in advance) and in bulk, so a change in the oil price must be long in advance before airlines can act accordingly and change the fuel surcharge. If airlines acted quickly and changed the price according to the current low price and then a few weeks later oil ...


4

Many airlines, and other large consumers of fuel (or other volatile commodities) will do what is called hedging. Specifically, fuel hedging works by (in simplified terms), buying fuel ahead of time (in the form of options) at a pre-arranged price. If the actual price of fuel is higher than the contractual price, the airline comes out ahead. If the price ...


3

You could also check Cityjet. They used to be an air france, but changed owners recently. Furthermore, do check all, because depending on dates you want to fly all might be the cheapest. Personally, I avoid Ryanair, just to avoid the hazzle, but if you are strictly abiding to their rules, and buy checked luggage ahead of time, they might be the cheapest


3

Based on the way that rate is presented on the website you pointed us to, I would say that it is simply a discounted rate, that is called an "Innkeepers Rate" ie a special deal offered the Innkeeper himself/herself. Hotels can get quite creative with their discount program names trying to build the perceived value. Most professional rates, such as the ...


3

Many soft drinks come in both glass bottles and in cans. The bottled version is less expensive, because the bottles are returnable. The cans not returnable, so you pay more since the container is not reusable. When you get into specialty versions, such as Coke Light, Coke Zero, etc, they tend to only come in cans, so they can be labeled as such. The ...



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