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91

To calculate the price of a ticket, we first need to know a little about how air pricing works. A ticket is a single, complete contract for one journey. It can contain up to a maximum sixteen flights. Each flight on the ticket must be paid for ("covered") by exactly one fare. A fare is a price that the airline offers on a city-pair, for example, London-New ...


44

Simply because the fuel cost is only a very small part of the total cab fee and at least until recently, when taxis had mechanically coupled taxameters, it would probably have been much more expensive taking fuel consumption into account than what anyone could have gained by doing so. The major part of the cab fee, perhaps as much as 80-90%, covers the ...


31

There are many things that airlines used to do that they can no longer do because customers have so much more information than before. 30 years ago, what people presented themselves as doing pretty well matched with what they were doing. But over the years, folks have learned (and shared with others) how pretending can save a lot of money: one way ticket ...


29

For most journeys, only one train company can cover that route, so there's no comparison involved. For your journey from London to Newcastle-upon-Tyne, the only option is to use Virgin Trains East Coast. When there are multiple companies, you can check using "National Rail Enquiries" which can search all the companies. A good example is London-Birmingham, ...


29

Yes, seriously, although the US$65 "royalty" is actually included in the US$200 "daily package fee". However, that's the group rate (3 or more people), you get socked another $40/30 per person if you're traveling solo/duo, and another $50/night/person if you're visiting when it's neither midwinter nor monsoon (March-May, Sep-Nov). Bhutan explicitly wants ...


27

It's definitely not the same thing. There are two 'routes'. One is along the pedestrian walkway on the bridge. Same height as the traffic and trains. (source: Wikipedia) The other is over the 'arch' of the bridge, which is the one you pay $185 for. You get safety lines, can't take anything up with you (including cameras, I gather) and you have a guide. ...


20

If you try and use the contactless Oyster twice in a row (ie to let a second person through on your card) for a trip from A to B, it'll error. You're required to touch out first before you can touch in again, and then the first person wouldn't be allowed to travel as they've touched out at A. Source: TFL official site: Number of people using an Oyster ...


19

California, USA is one place where you see these posted rates. I believe this is to comply with Civil Code Section 1863: (a) Every keeper of a hotel, inn, boardinghouse or lodginghouse, shall post in a conspicuous place in the office or public room, and in every bedroom of said hotel, boardinghouse, inn, or lodginghouse, a printed copy of this ...


16

The answer is most definitely NO. The fuel prices could be different from station to station some time from block to block and gas stations across the street from each other may have different prices for the same grade of fuel. Reasons for this may vary from local rents and taxes to the ownership of a particular gas station. Case in point close to me ...


16

This very likely violates the airline's terms. ("Illegal" might be putting it too strongly.) For example, here is the relevant passage from United Airlines' Contract of Carriage. J) Prohibited Practices: Fares apply for travel only between the points for which they are published. Tickets may not be purchased and used at fare(s) from an ...


15

You asked Why should the airline care if I depart on Tuesday and return Thursday of the same week, or the next week? and you answered: because business travelers will pay more. That's all there is to it. It's called price discrimination and it's practiced by just about any business that can get away with it -- all the more so in competitive ...


15

One Person per Journey for all Contactless Methods To add on to @MarkMayo's answer, the same rules apply for payment across all contactless methods (Oyster and Contactless-card): you can pay for only one person per journey with contactless methods. Quoting from TFL's website on the topic: Touching in and out [...] Like Oyster, you can only pay ...


14

From an airline staff member, as long as you do not have checked-in luggage to be delivered at the final destination and the sectors are within the same country then it is hard for the airlines to figure that out (they don't care actually). How will the airlines find out? Sometimes, at some airlines, in some sectors there will be an airline representative ...


13

Apparently there seem to be some studies that say that there's a drop in flight inquires (often cited in articles is a study of Jetcost.co.uk that says it drops by something between 24 and 27%). Another study by kayak.com seems to show that the prices are between 5 and 15% lower. However, I don't know how serious those studies were as I couldn't find the ...


13

Promoting a comment to an answer - it's actually really really complicated! There's a reason why even Google can't give you an answer quickly, and why multi-city quotes can take such an age to run.... The best explanation I've come across of why this is, what goes into the complexity, what work there is in finding out the prices etc is given in this ...


12

It sounds crazy, but yes, there are multiple classes within the standard first, business, and economy. Each airline has their own method for dividing this up, but with Singapore they have: Suites/First: RFAP O Business: CDJZ I Economy: SYBMHWUEKGQNVT X So they've divided it up into a lot of classes! What's the difference? Well from the ...


12

No and no. Each location sets its own price for different prices of gasoline (and diesel and kerosene, where they are available). This is true both of independent stations and those branded with a national chain (e.g. Exxon, Shell, Chevron, 7-11, Sunoco, and so on). Most gas stations in the U.S. are independent franchise operations— most people, including ...


12

Two possibilities spring to mind. Coca Cola is produced by local partners, http://www.coca-colacompany.com/our-company/bottler-web-sites it is possible that the local partner in Indonesia does not have the space on its production line to make diet coke, which means that it would have to be imported, hence the higher price. The second thought that I had ...


12

For starters it is not a "minimum spend", rather it is the base rate per day for tours. It covers your government taxes, accommodation, three meals, guide services and transport. If you are doing some more specialized like white water rafting, climbing, etc there is a supplement. If you are wanting to stay in upscale hotels there is a supplement. The ...


12

i have never been in a country where the taxi fare changed depending on the number of passengers. If there are seatbelts for 3 passengers, you can take 3 passengers. Some countries charge for bags, others only if there are a lot of bags or the driver handles them. In general, the weight of the passengers is rather small compared to the weight of the ...


12

The Internet was a game changer in many businesses and the travel agency world is no exception. Nowadays people can easily (this is arguable) find the cheapest price in a quick search; therefore, agencies need to present the best price to be able to sell since that's a key factor. How can they do this? (These are assumptions based on general commercial ...


10

With regular NS trains (intercity's, sprinter's and stoptrains) booking in advance does not give you any discount. If you would travel with a NS HiSpeed train this could be the case, but there's no direct HiSpeed connection between Eindhoven and Amsterdam, so it's irrelevant to your journey. There's a direct train between Eindhoven and Amsterdam Central ...


10

I've worked in the hospitality industry for 18 years in the United States so I can answer this with some knowledge. Most states require a hotel to post their "Maximum Possible Rate" on the back of the guest room door. This is to keep a hotel from "price gouging" in the event of a natural disaster or even from discriminatory practices, (charging someone of a ...


10

That's perfectly valid, as most sightseeing is in Zone 1. What you could do is buy a 7 day travel pass immediately at Heathrow (zone 1 and 2) which you put ONTO your Oyster Card. To explain - the Oyster is just a card. You then either top it up with pre-pay, or you put travel cards on to it. So step 1 - buy the card. Step 2 - get some prepay on it to ...


10

Unless you're an Indian, Bangladeshi or Maldivian citizen, you are unable to enter Bhutan without going through a Bhutanese tour agent - either directly or via a tour agent in your own country. You will not receive a visa otherwise. These tour agents are the ones that effectively "ensure" that you will meet the minimum spend as per Bhutanese tourist ...


10

Surcharges for Extra Passengers Here are two counterexamples. In both Italy and France, if I recall correctly, taxis charge extra when the number of passengers require one to seat on the front seat next to the driver. Furthermore, a surcharge can be applied when the customer requires a car with more than 5 seats (including the driver). Note that the concept ...


10

That is 600 lbs (~ 43 stone) more than the original ride for 1 person. Quite a significant increase, which has got to affect the fuel consumption of that taxi cab noticeably. You are mistaken there. The weight of the car is really a very minor part of the fuel consumption and an even more minor part of the total costs of running a car. So for ...


10

It's not clear. As far as I know, nothing has been ruled out or abolished, it's just that announced dates for vote/approval for new measures slip and nothing has happened yet. There were no further mandatory price cuts planned in the current regulation after the ones that took place last year and therefore no strict timeline. But the idea is still in the ...


9

I was in Sydney last year for a visit and thought about doing the Harbour Bridge walk. It's undoubtedly a great experience, but it's expensive and you're not allowed to take your own camera with you. I was advised instead to go to the Pylon Lookout (http://www.sydney.com.au/pylon-lookout.htm) which is a fraction of the cost at $AU 13, and also has a ...



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