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2

I can't recall the last time I bought an electronic device that didn't have a universal power supply; and I am including here laptops, desktops, mobile phones, e-readers, SLR cameras, mirror-less cameras, gaming consoles, hair drier, microwave, refrigerator, washing machine ... and that's all I could think of in terms of recent purchases. The oldest device ...


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Here's my collected knowledge about power adapters and travel power strips: If you need a three pole travel power strip try the Voltage Valet PS2 Travel Power Strip. The Skross World Adapter PRO is an absolutely unique three prongs (earthed) adapter (family). Yes, Tumi also sells an adapter like that but if you look closely you'll find the Skross logo on ...


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It's much better to buy your converters at home. I would say that 99% of the converters for sale in this city are to allow US travelers to plug their devices into foreign plugs. I'm aware of only one store that has a few that are for plugging foreign devices into US plugs. An exception to this general pattern is airports that get a lot of international ...


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CAUTION When using "Voltage Converters" or "Step up Transformers" you need to make absolutely sure that you do not exceed the rated power of the device. If you want to bring devices that consume significant power (iron, hair dryer, etc) you will need a big and heavy transformer. Lightweight devices typically do not have the required power and connecting an ...


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You can either buy plug converters or universal travel adaptor for $2 to $5 in most supermarkets or phone shops. This is just a converter not step up adaptor, if you are looking to charge your mobile phones or laptops which comes with adaptor they will work fine with 120 Volts but if you have electronic items like iron box etc, which doesn't have adaptor ...


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You are better off buying a plug adapter in India for the USA, rather than the other way around. A lot of what is sold in the USA would be for adapting a US plug to a foreign socket. You can find adapters for foreign plugs, they just aren't common. Power wise, it depends on your device needs. Most modern electronics (phones, tablets, laptops, etc) have ...


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Your fan, or its power supply, should have a label on it indicating the acceptable power inputs. You should find something like: Input AC 120-240V 50-60Hz This gives the range of voltages and frequencies that are acceptable. If it says "50-60Hz" then you are OK at 50Hz. (Or any other range that includes 50Hz, but other ranges will be very rare.) If it ...


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The answer is unfortunately not as simple as stated by CMaster. If the device contains an AC motor directly driven by the mains voltage, reducing the mains frequency will indeed cause the motor to rotate slower, but it may also overload the motor. It is difficult to easily explain the physics behind this, but basically, a motor needs a larger magnetic core ...


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If the system is simple enough, it shouldn't be a problem. The motors will work, just spin slower. If there's more complicated electrics going on, or slowing the speed of the fan will effect the actual role of the device, then you might have bigger problems. Edit: While this answer covers "does it run", other answers have shown that there additional ...



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