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23

No need for converters, your charger accepts anything form 100V to 240V. It is safe to use it anywhere in the world.


20

I used to 'get around this' technicality by asking at the info desks at airports where there might be a power point to charge my laptop etc, even if I'd spotted some. They'd usually helpfully point out one, or say 'oh just use any you find'. That way I figured I'd be able to argue being covered if it came down to security yelling at me or worse. I've also ...


16

Your laptop and phone chargers are designed to operate at a voltage between 100 - 240 V. Your electric shaver on the other hand may not be able to handle the different voltages and will not work in the USA. Unfortunately for the electric shaver, you are stuck with 220V. The best way to make sure is to check on the device or its power supply. An example of ...


15

It's not theft. Unless otherwise noted, intentionally blocked, or obviously intended for some other purpose (e.g. to plug in an ATM), the outlets in the waiting area are specifically there for passenger convenience. In fact, airliners and airports are specifically expanding this functionality for more people to take advantage of; Omaha's Eppley Airfield ...


12

The fourth line of text on the device (counting those two lines on the top right) says: EINGANG 230V~50Hz 4W where 'Eingang' is German for 'input', '230V~50Hz' means '230Volts AC at 50Hz' and 4W is the maximum power. Since the US mains have a voltage of 120V and a frequency of 60Hz, you will need a transformer, but then the device will work.


11

You will only need an adapter for your plugs, as US sockets are not equipped for either of the two plugs used in India. The adapters for the two pin Euro plugs are easy to find, the three pin a bit more challenging, but probably readily available in India before you leave. If by chance you plan to be in the US for a couple of years of study, many laptop ...


10

All "normal" mains power supplies should be OK. Most 'universal' supplies will work down to 90 VAC. Most switch mode supplies convert the AC to DC and then deal with that. You can find exotic systems - but not in normal use. Maybe shipboard or aircraft in extreme cases - but nothing that they would supply to members of the public. Rarely in "out of the ...


8

According to Wikipedia, the minimal voltage is 100 V in Japan and the maximum voltage 240 V in several countries. As for the frequency, they all lie between 50-60 Hz. So there isn't any country with such an exotic voltage or frequency that wouldn't fit the range you mentioned. If you think of it, it wouldn't make sense for a small country to go too far ...


7

As the commonts say, check seatguru to see if you're likely to have at-seat power. I don't recall every being on a Delta or KLM flight that had at seat power in economy, they most likely will in business. If it's got a newer version of the in-seat entertainment it might have a USB socket and that might be powered, although it depends (again, check seatguru) ...


7

It's not as important as the power requirement. From a piece on Wikitravel: Frequency is generally not a problem--most travel items will work on either 50 or 60 Hz. If all the electrical appliance does is produce heat or light (except fluorescent lighting), then the frequency is unlikely to matter. However, I assume you're talking about a laptop ...


7

I've done this all over the world without incident. Just make sure your devices are ok with the voltage coming from the wall, and that you're not throwing away grounding protection by using a two prong adapter instead of one with a grounding strip. To check voltages, I use Wikipedia. In your case Spain and the UK are on the same voltage, so that's not an ...


6

In Chile, ungrounded plugs are compatible with Europlugs, so you should be able to use the Swiss plug directly. Some sockets only accept grounded plugs, which have a round grounding pin directly between the two round power pins. Apparently similar plugs are used in Italy, but I had never seen an adapter for it before I came to Chile. I have no recollection ...


6

As always, Wikipedia has a good list which can answer this question. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity_by_country which has info, specs, and pictures for each plug type by country. It looks like Chile and Argentina have different mains plug types and you may only need an adapter for Argentina.


6

I would recommend you to get someone to write down for you how to say the proper question in Chinese, print it out and show it to people. That would bridge the language gap. From my perspective your real issue is that you do not only need a power outlet, but a chair next to it and a permission to sit there for a while and work. If you would have a working ...


5

I had a similar but not identical issue with a French Wii U in Japan - it also uses an external, non-switching supply, but as France is 220V and Japan is 100V I needed a step up transformer. To take your questions: Yes, Beijing is 220V 50Hz. No, the frequency difference won't cause any issues (this only really affects timing circuits) 200W is plenty as ...


5

You may be better off with a 220V certified rated charger, rather than converter. They should be freely interchangeable with 110V ones, as long as toothbrush is concerned. For Sonicare: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Philips-Sonicare-FlexCare-Toothbrush-Genuine/dp/B00DGTGTXY For Waterpik: http://waterpikukonline.co.uk/replacement-parts/wp-450-chargers The ...


5

Firstly, look on your laptop's power unit/base/charger. Usually the fine print will give you a range - e.g. Rated input AC100-240V or something similar. If it matches the range required, then no power converter is required for you to be able to use it there. So, then it's down to the adapter (plug) and the voltage in the Philippines. You can use this ...


5

New Zealand uses 230V and AS/NZS 3112 plug: You need to check first that all your chargers support also 230V (iDevices chargers normally are 100-240V) after you need a travel adapter, like this one: Skross World Travel Adaptor 3 Because you will stay 9 months, for your iPad and iPhone you can consider buy in New Zealand the Apple 12W USB Power ...


5

Yes, I bring power adapters in my hand luggage all the time without problems.


5

Each charger/power supply/device will have an input voltage/frequency rating that you have to check individually. There is no generic " will/will not work" answer as all power supplies can be different. If the input rating is supported you can expect about the same performance as at your home location. Generally there are two broad distinctions between ...


4

Wikipedia has some pretty extensive information about power standards around the world. According to this information, the Philippines uses types A, B, and C plugs: However, it operates at 220V, 60Hz. The US uses 120V 60Hz. So while your US plugs (Type A & B) will physically fit into the sockets in the Philippines, you need to be sure your ...


4

Later model Dell laptops have power supplies rated 110 - 240V, so you won't need a converter since power in the Philippines is 220V but the plug may not match, which means that you may need a power plug adapter like this one to be able to plug it in. I would though check the Power Supply as to actual power ratings.


4

In addition to codinghands's answer, for point 3, my experience in Guangdong suggest the outlets are usually universal. Anyway, a travel adapter should solve the outlet problem for you. As a side note, console games have been banned in China since the 2000s until 2013. People in China had managed to play on imported consoles with appropriate PSU and adapter ...


4

You would rather need a 220 to a 110 converter. I have been using this converter(on a daily basis for over a month now) in Australia (India and Australia have the same voltage/power levels I am told) and all my US appliances work well. It has a little bit of a fan noise in a very quiet room, but that doesn't bother me. Also, you need this only if your ...


4

Finnair generally use a fairly standard "universal" 2/3 prong power socket that will accept (at least) plugs with a US or European style plug, with power at 110 volts. Depending on the specific plane it may also have the even-more-universal socket that will also take UK, Australian, etc, plugs - however I would not recommend relying on that as not all ...


4

ADAC Postbus offer both electric socket and wifi, they advertise with it.


4

You can find Kettle (or electric jug) in many stores (El Corte ingles, FNAC) in Spanish the name is "Hervidor de agua" http://www.fnac.es/Bodum-Bistro-Hervidor-de-agua-11451-294-Color-Rojo-Desayuno-Cafe-Accesorios-para-el-desayuno-Expresso-y-cafeteras/a839940 P.S. I posted a link to the item as an exmaple, but it can be purchased on person in the store.


4

An electric jug will do most things better than an immersion heater in your case. If you can to minimise water used be sure that the coil of the element face downwards towards bottom of the jug. As long as the water is say 5mm above the parts of the element that get hot it will work well. You may be able to have a small part of the hot portion above water ...


4

According to electricaloutlet.org, the outlets in Thailand are either type A or type C outlets, respectively: Type C is used in Sweden as well, along with type F (they are almost the same, C can fit in F and vice versa), so all you need to be certain is an adapter from type C/F to type A as shown above. Regarding voltage, in Thailand it is 220v and in ...


4

Both of them will be ok. However, on my opinion, I would prefer type C, because it has more flexibility in using. Also type C can be used in a lot of countries. If you travel a lot it's a big advantage. More information you may find here: http://www.iec.ch/worldplugs/typeC.htm



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