Hot answers tagged

49

This feature is becoming increasingly common in many establishments. In my opinion the purpose of such card-activated time switches is to reduce costs: the removal of the card ensures that some/all electronic appliances are turned off when the guest leaves the room, thus saving money to the hotel. Indeed guests are often given one card to access the room ...


45

Mains power is not like a precise lab instrument with strict voltage ranges. The European Standard EN50160 (this is a draft, the standard is an expensive download) for example prescribes +-10%, the UK standard prescribes +10% -6% in the power supply (search for "frequency and voltage at supply" in the standard without quotes) so 230V in reality is a wide ...


27

I have seen these cards control everything including plugs (so annoying to leave your laptop charging while you go out for the day, and come back to find the plug was not on while you were gone) just lights but not plugs lights and air conditioner but not plugs just the air conditioner Whether it exists and what it controls seems to vary around the world....


18

There are two types of travel adapter plugs commonly used: Plug adapters. These just convert the physical plug into one of a different shape, but do not perform any voltage conversion. It is perfectly fine and common to use one with a power strip (with surge protector). As Aganju points out, you should be careful not to overload any circuits, as a power ...


15

While the other answers have elaborated on the primary reasons, I am going to point out what I perceive as a secondary reason and/or benefit: The key has its fixed place. To me as a hotel guest, this seems incredibly beneficial because it means the key does not lie around somewhere where I might forget it when leaving the room. Instead, it's in its fixed ...


15

General rule: read the sticker on the item you want to use, although in some cases it is a text area molded into the plastic of the transformer of the charger. Most laptops, phones, camera chargers and such these days are made to run off 100 as well as 240 volt, and can handle 50 as well as 60 hertz. If something is made to run on 240 volt, it will ...


10

Since 230V is in the range 100-240V, you do not need a transformer. You will probably need an adapter. Botswana doesn't seem to have a standard; can you find out what kind of plugs are in your hotel, or the business you're visiting? I would suggest bringing at least one adapter labeled Africa and a British one, but consider a universal adapter so you can ...


9

Yes you may. Modern auto-switching computer adaptors will happily work between all worldwide voltage ranges supplied to consumers. As you say yourself, the adaptor claims to work from as low as 100 volts between live and neutral (the Japanese standard) up to 240 volts (the old British standard*, although from time to time even on the German grid the ...


8

The concept of a "Type SE" seems to be a Japanese thing: the canonical list of plug types is maintained by the International Electrotechnical Commission, and they don't recognize it. The best source I could find, then, is this random Japanese site, which claims that Type SE is identical to the Type C, except that: Type SE plugs have may have a hole for a ...


8

I can verify that the N700a trains have power sockets for the seats at the ends of the cars. Look at the bottom of the side wall under the window near your feet. Plugged in right now, actually :-)


7

Old question but I think the core of the right answer is still missing and since it's potentially a safety concern it may warrant another as answer. All step down transformers are rated for a certain power. If you exceed the rated power, bad things will happen. YOU MUST NEVER EXCEED THE RATED POWER. A hair straightener needs a lot of power and would ...


7

Yes, the German type plug will fit in there, if you look closely you will notice a curved notch in the outlet made for round pins. Check the end of the arrow: Actually, plugs with round pins are the standard in Qatar the country, along with the UK type.


7

yes and no. The adapter does not add any risk or danger, so the answer would be: Yes it is safe. However, and this applies at home the same, the total power you are pulling through all the plugs in the power strip must not be over the total supported limit, otherwise you will either trip the circuit, or start a fire. Depending on your target country, ...


7

Well, I can lend you my experience living in a somewhat rural town, less than 300m from the power plant and right next to a factory. I'm Italian, so the nominal voltage would be 230V at 50Hz. First off, being so near to the plant most of the time the line voltage was closer to 250. I've even seen 260 on a few occasions. But then there's the factory. ...


5

Based on the logo on the socket, this is an "EmPower" socket - which isn't surprising as they are the most common type of these sockets on airplanes. You can find a datasheet for these types of sockets here, that claims they are "Compatible with plugs from over 170 countries", and then specifically shows compatibility with multiple forms of 2-plug European ...


5

Some shavers may work with just an adapter. A clock may need a frequency converter, which is a far more expensive and bulky piece of equipment than the voltage converter you show here. Look at the existing power supply (i.e. the inline brick or "wall wart" plug used to plug into a US outlet). It will say the range of voltage it allows for input. If it says "...


5

Here's a canonical reference for Peter Green's answer (sorry, too long for a comment). Botswana uses Type D, Type G and Type M sockets. See: http://www.iec.ch/worldplugs/typeD.htm http://www.iec.ch/worldplugs/typeG.htm http://www.iec.ch/worldplugs/typeM.htm noting the panel to the right contains 'Botswana' in each case. These are specified here: https:/...


5

The answer is unfortunately not as simple as stated by CMaster. If the device contains an AC motor directly driven by the mains voltage, reducing the mains frequency will indeed cause the motor to rotate slower, but it may also overload the motor. It is difficult to easily explain the physics behind this, but basically, a motor needs a larger magnetic core ...


5

You are better off buying a plug adapter in India for the USA, rather than the other way around. A lot of what is sold in the USA would be for adapting a US plug to a foreign socket. You can find adapters for foreign plugs, they just aren't common. Power wise, it depends on your device needs. Most modern electronics (phones, tablets, laptops, etc) have ...


5

I live in Ireland and was in Hong Kong earlier this year - I had no problem doing it the other way. I can't say for certain, but I'd be very surprised if it proved problematic.


5

Generally, new and longer-distance trains will, older suburban ones won't. Quite a few have them in first class, but not in standard. CrossCountry Voyager trains have power available in most seats, and a nice seating plan: Seating Plan East Midland have power on their 'Meridian' trains but not their HSTs - link South West Trains don't generally - it ...


5

UK answer. Recently refurbished long distance trains tend to have sockets in the seating areas for the passengers touse, these are usually these are often labelled something like "laptops and mobile phones only" reflecting their intended use. Local trains and older trains are less likely to have them. There is no charge for using them. The sockets are ...


5

There are a couple (literally: I saw 2) publicly accessible sockets in the primary B terminal, which is nice and modern but very crowded; both of the sockets I saw were in use, which isn't surprising because there were probably a couple hundred people in the terminal. However, but there are many more sockets in the A terminal, which is older, dirty, and ...


4

A "Type C" adapter will work fine in Type E and Type F sockets. From AC power plugs and sockets: The separation and length of the pins allow its safe insertion in CEE 7/1, CEE 7/3 "Schuko", CEE 7/5, and most Israeli, Swiss, Danish and Italian sockets.


4

Although Germany uses Type F, in a few days visiting it I found a few outlets of C type. In Croatia almost every outlet is F type. Using a type C adapter would work on any case, as it has the same separation (19mm between the center of each pin) but thinner pins (4m vs 4.8mm). The only con is that it would fit a bit looser and will be easier to unplug it ...


4

My Surface Pro 3 has been to Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and most of the Pacific Ocean. All I need is the plug adapter (two prong) not a converter. It works just fine. Cell phone chargers, camera chargers etc are also happy with 240, 110, or anything in between as long as you get an adapter for the prongs.


4

Both Worldstandards.eu and the IEC maintain pages on the types of sockets in use around the world. The UK uses Type G almost universally (there's the odd exceptions of "Shaver sockets" in bathrooms and some hotels have a strange, round 3 pin setup for lighting only). So you need something that will take your Nowergian C/F plugs and convert them to G. You'll ...


4

Several quick rules of thumb: Almost everything has a sticker or imprint that lists the input voltage. Look at that. For the more electronics savvy: if you're just trying to do a quick inventory in your head you can usually just go on whether the device already requires voltage conversion. Computers, phones, and other things with charging batteries almost ...


4

As I understand it there are various categories of device that people use when taking equipment abroad. Plug adaptors simply convert the type of the plug, they do not change voltage. So they can only be used if the device is compatible with the voltage of the destination country. Thyrister or Triac based converters, work in a similar way to a lighting ...


4

No, I'm afraid there are no power outlets in these trains except in the bathrooms & in the hallway... You can still take a portable battery with you to charge your phone... during the night.



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