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22

No need for converters, your charger accepts anything form 100V to 240V. It is safe to use it anywhere in the world. Note that the output of AC-DC adapters will always be the same regardless of the input voltage.


16

Your laptop and phone chargers are designed to operate at a voltage between 100 - 240 V. Your electric shaver on the other hand may not be able to handle the different voltages and will not work in the USA. Unfortunately for the electric shaver, you are stuck with 220V. The best way to make sure is to check on the device or its power supply. An example of ...


16

Safety Disclaimer There are various way to do this, none of which are risk-free. Any damage to you, your personal property, nature, the Universe is entirely your fault. You Cannot Fully Charge Your Device The bottom line however is that you should avoid fully-charging the battery. Instead you should aim for a short charge, giving you enough juice to ...


14

The fourth line of text on the device (counting those two lines on the top right) says: EINGANG 230V~50Hz 4W where 'Eingang' is German for 'input', '230V~50Hz' means '230Volts AC at 50Hz' and 4W is the maximum power. Since the US mains have a voltage of 120V and a frequency of 60Hz, you will need a transformer, but then the device will work.


10

You will only need an adapter for your plugs, as US sockets are not equipped for either of the two plugs used in India. The adapters for the two pin Euro plugs are easy to find, the three pin a bit more challenging, but probably readily available in India before you leave. If by chance you plan to be in the US for a couple of years of study, many laptop ...


9

Yes, it should work. Electricity supplies with nominal voltages of 220, 230 or 240 volts are in practice the same. There are tolerances of about ±10 % in the voltage (to account for the voltage drop in transmission lines which depends on the load), so devices labeled with either of these voltages will actually be designed to function on anywhere between 200 ...


7

As the commonts say, check seatguru to see if you're likely to have at-seat power. I don't recall every being on a Delta or KLM flight that had at seat power in economy, they most likely will in business. If it's got a newer version of the in-seat entertainment it might have a USB socket and that might be powered, although it depends (again, check seatguru) ...


7

I've done this all over the world without incident. Just make sure your devices are ok with the voltage coming from the wall, and that you're not throwing away grounding protection by using a two prong adapter instead of one with a grounding strip. To check voltages, I use Wikipedia. In your case Spain and the UK are on the same voltage, so that's not an ...


6

New Zealand uses 230V and AS/NZS 3112 plug: You need to check first that all your chargers support also 230V (iDevices chargers normally are 100-240V) after you need a travel adapter, like this one: Skross World Travel Adaptor 3 Because you will stay 9 months, for your iPad and iPhone you can consider buy in New Zealand the Apple 12W USB Power ...


6

Wikipedia has an article on all plugs used in all countries, with a table for comparison. Or for a picture version (albeit comparing them to Australian plugs, but at least it shows you) - this will show you what they look like. Basically, international outlet/plug types A and C, and they run at 220V/50Hz. Coming from the Netherlands, you will need an ...


6

Very much depends on the cruise ship, and it's often based on their country of origin. Here are some examples: in the help of P&O cruises (a British-American cruise line) : Oceana and Britannia also have US 2 pin sockets in addition to UK 3 pin sockets The standard electrical supply in the United Kingdom is 50HZ (cycles) and 240V. The supply on board ...


5

Each charger/power supply/device will have an input voltage/frequency rating that you have to check individually. There is no generic " will/will not work" answer as all power supplies can be different. If the input rating is supported you can expect about the same performance as at your home location. Generally there are two broad distinctions between ...


5

Yes, I bring power adapters in my hand luggage all the time without problems.


5

You may be better off with a 220V certified rated charger, rather than converter. They should be freely interchangeable with 110V ones, as long as toothbrush is concerned. For Sonicare: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Philips-Sonicare-FlexCare-Toothbrush-Genuine/dp/B00DGTGTXY For Waterpik: http://waterpikukonline.co.uk/replacement-parts/wp-450-chargers The ...


5

Yes, the socket delivers different voltage but electric appliances will support a range of voltages, and plug types C, E, F are compatible with the sockets. See http://www.worldstandards.eu/electricity/plug-voltage-by-country/


4

You would rather need a 220 to a 110 converter. I have been using this converter(on a daily basis for over a month now) in Australia (India and Australia have the same voltage/power levels I am told) and all my US appliances work well. It has a little bit of a fan noise in a very quiet room, but that doesn't bother me. Also, you need this only if your ...


4

Finnair generally use a fairly standard "universal" 2/3 prong power socket that will accept (at least) plugs with a US or European style plug, with power at 110 volts. Depending on the specific plane it may also have the even-more-universal socket that will also take UK, Australian, etc, plugs - however I would not recommend relying on that as not all ...


4

Both of them will be ok. However, on my opinion, I would prefer type C, because it has more flexibility in using. Also type C can be used in a lot of countries. If you travel a lot it's a big advantage. More information you may find here: http://www.iec.ch/worldplugs/typeC.htm


3

Avoid doing this and you will be safe :) Voltage won't be a problem. Still remember to check if travelling for other countries outside Europe. a few mobile and laptop chargers should not be a problem connected on the same power strip. Still, if you're planning to hook more devices be carefull with the itensity (and this is where you can screw up with too ...


3

Contrary to Mark's post, you will likely not need an adapter coming from the Netherlands. Thailand uses both the round pin plugs common in Europe as well as the flat pin plugs common in the USA & Canada. The wall outlets here accommodate both style plugs, using sockets similar to the one shown in pnuts comment link - ...


3

Check whether your batteries are NiMh (or NiCd) or Lithium. Don't mix them, as they have different charging and discharging requirements. I assume you're not talking alkalines, and that you know you can't charge them :). Use the 5 V output of the panel, anything higher will risk to blow up your batteries. As it's probably USB, it should be also limited (or ...


3

LAX now offers Free WiFi throughout the airport, along with a relatively cheap upgrade for 'premium' connection speeds. Credit cards are accepted at most (all?) shops and restaurants, and power outlets can be found around the airport. Expect competition for an ideally located open outlet at peak times - traveling with a splitter or power strip can make you ...


3

As others said, most advanced electronic devices (laptop, phone & camera chargers) typically work with a wide range of voltages, 100-240 V (check the label!), so no voltage converter needed, only a wall plug adapter. Some simpler appliances such as shavers, hairdryers, kitchen mixers, etc. don't usually work automatically with a wide range of voltages. ...


3

Yes, you can use a Europe (type C) adaptor with type D sockets. The reason E and F plugs are unsafe with a type D socket is that the ground (earth) connection will not be made. If the manufacturer of an appliance has determined that a ground connection is necessary for a particular appliance, then it will be unsafe if used with a type D socket. This usually ...


3

India has a 230V 50Hz (voltage of 230 Volts, frequency of 50 Hertz) system. Therefore any electronics purchased for a country with this voltage and frequency will obviously work. However the situation in reality is much better than this. Almost all modern electronics is designed to work with a wide range of AC input voltages and frequencies, because they ...


3

It will depend on the ship. Cunard seems to have one US + one UK plug officially, and if you search around you find some more (by unplugging TV etc.), but they have tons of British customers. Other cruise ships might have US + European.


3

You can use a US-style "type A" power strip in the UK, so long as some conditions are met: It must not have any components such as lamps or meters which are sensitive to the line voltage. Obviously the power strip will be seeing 220V instead of 120V, and some power strips do have lamps to indicate power being applied which could pose a problem if used ...


3

As I'm posting this from a French laptop plugged into a wall in a Moscow apartment, I can confirm that everything works perfectly without any need for adaptors.


3

Thanks to @Relaxed 's helpful comments I now know at least the power situation: right now you might find yourself on a train where only first class has power but this is changing and at some indefinite point in the future every seat will have power. Details: The SBB timetable change on 14 December 2014 says: From 14 December, passengers will be able to ...


2

You could put it into a small cardboard box to prevent damage if you really want to check it. That would prevent it from spearing anything else too. Or wrap it in bubble wrap. Or just shove it inside a shoe etc. But I typically take a back-pack loaded with all kinds of cables and wires onto every flight. They make me take the laptop out, but that leaves ...



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