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20

I used to 'get around this' technicality by asking at the info desks at airports where there might be a power point to charge my laptop etc, even if I'd spotted some. They'd usually helpfully point out one, or say 'oh just use any you find'. That way I figured I'd be able to argue being covered if it came down to security yelling at me or worse. I've also ...


15

It's not theft. Unless otherwise noted, intentionally blocked, or obviously intended for some other purpose (e.g. to plug in an ATM), the outlets in the waiting area are specifically there for passenger convenience. In fact, airliners and airports are specifically expanding this functionality for more people to take advantage of; Omaha's Eppley Airfield ...


14

Bath, like the rest of Britain, uses standard British plugs with three rectangular prongs, known to a few as BS 1363. If you've heard somewhere about Britain having different plugs in Bath, you (or whoever told you that) may have misheard: Britain uses different plugs in bathrooms. British electrical safety regulations are very tight, and normal outlets ...


11

As they sometimes say in those parts, "pull the other one, it's got bells on it"... Wiring regulations in the UK are produced by the IET (formerly the IEE), as part of BS 7671:2008(2011). They're the same across the whole country, and quite a few other countries copy them too. Some international focused places may additionally offer continental or US ...


9

All "normal" mains power supplies should be OK. Most 'universal' supplies will work down to 90 VAC. Most switch mode supplies convert the AC to DC and then deal with that. You can find exotic systems - but not in normal use. Maybe shipboard or aircraft in extreme cases - but nothing that they would supply to members of the public. Rarely in "out of the ...


8

FlexiBus and Meinferinbus offer Free Wi-Fi, but no electric socket. As far as I know berlinlinienbus doesn't offer Wi-Fi nor electric socket. Eurolines offers Wi-Fi and electric socket in the Eurolines Business class buses


8

According to Wikipedia, the minimal voltage is 100 V in Japan and the maximum voltage 240 V in several countries. As for the frequency, they all lie between 50-60 Hz. So there isn't any country with such an exotic voltage or frequency that wouldn't fit the range you mentioned. If you think of it, it wouldn't make sense for a small country to go too far ...


7

According to the Sleeping in Airports review, you can charge for a fee at Terminal 1, Boarding Area B near Gate 23 Terminal 3, Boarding Area E near Gate 61 Terminal 3, Boarding Area F near Gate 87 You might find free plugs elsewhere, but if you're desperate head on over and get charged up, then do more looking.


7

In most airports or trains stations, you can buy a multi-adaptor. They let you switch between almost any country, except South Africa, usually, as it's a ginormous plug. Example: Alternatively, look at the link that Andra commented on with, where you could look into a powerstrip with different source plugs that you could adapt to. However, I figure ...


7

It's not as important as the power requirement. From a piece on Wikitravel: Frequency is generally not a problem--most travel items will work on either 50 or 60 Hz. If all the electrical appliance does is produce heat or light (except fluorescent lighting), then the frequency is unlikely to matter. However, I assume you're talking about a laptop ...


6

I would recommend you to get someone to write down for you how to say the proper question in Chinese, print it out and show it to people. That would bridge the language gap. From my perspective your real issue is that you do not only need a power outlet, but a chair next to it and a permission to sit there for a while and work. If you would have a working ...


6

In Chile, ungrounded plugs are compatible with Europlugs, so you should be able to use the Swiss plug directly. Some sockets only accept grounded plugs, which have a round grounding pin directly between the two round power pins. Apparently similar plugs are used in Italy, but I had never seen an adapter for it before I came to Chile. I have no recollection ...


6

As always, Wikipedia has a good list which can answer this question. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity_by_country which has info, specs, and pictures for each plug type by country. It looks like Chile and Argentina have different mains plug types and you may only need an adapter for Argentina.


6

Have you tried the Tumi adapter kit...? http://www.tumi.com/product/index.jsp?productId=4209721 $ 50 may seem expensive, but it's never let me down. You can also look for cheaper alternatives if you search for "Universal Adapter Kits".


5

Apple claims the 2013 version of MacBook Air has battery that can last up to 12 hours. (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=MacBook_Air&oldid=577817487) A test performed by The Verge, for example, found Apple's claim to be accurate, with the laptop running for 13 hours and 29 minutes while "[cycling] through a series of websites and images at 65 ...


5

I had a similar but not identical issue with a French Wii U in Japan - it also uses an external, non-switching supply, but as France is 220V and Japan is 100V I needed a step up transformer. To take your questions: Yes, Beijing is 220V 50Hz. No, the frequency difference won't cause any issues (this only really affects timing circuits) 200W is plenty as ...


5

As the commonts say, check seatguru to see if you're likely to have at-seat power. I don't recall every being on a Delta or KLM flight that had at seat power in economy, they most likely will in business. If it's got a newer version of the in-seat entertainment it might have a USB socket and that might be powered, although it depends (again, check seatguru) ...


4

An electric jug will do most things better than an immersion heater in your case. If you can to minimise water used be sure that the coil of the element face downwards towards bottom of the jug. As long as the water is say 5mm above the parts of the element that get hot it will work well. You may be able to have a small part of the hot portion above water ...


4

Three approaches: choose an airline that has in-seat power. get a sheet battery - the one I have for my Windows laptop adds another 7 hours or so - that attaches to the laptop and doesn't look external, so you can use it in place get an external battery and take a break for a little while to let it do its charging under your seat or somewhere the crew ...


4

Short answer: most likely you'll be able to use your devices in most places, but, just in case, bring a simple US-Europe power adapter like this: Long answer: Brazil had always used both US and European power plug standards, but since 2011 ISO 60906-1 is the only acceptable one, i.e. now it's not allowed to sell the old plugs/sockets in stores. So you ...


4

You can find Kettle (or electric jug) in many stores (El Corte ingles, FNAC) in Spanish the name is "Hervidor de agua" http://www.fnac.es/Bodum-Bistro-Hervidor-de-agua-11451-294-Color-Rojo-Desayuno-Cafe-Accesorios-para-el-desayuno-Expresso-y-cafeteras/a839940 P.S. I posted a link to the item as an exmaple, but it can be purchased on person in the store.


4

In addition to codinghands's answer, for point 3, my experience in Guangdong suggest the outlets are usually universal. Anyway, a travel adapter should solve the outlet problem for you. As a side note, console games have been banned in China since the 2000s until 2013. People in China had managed to play on imported consoles with appropriate PSU and adapter ...


4

Later model Dell laptops have power supplies rated 110 - 240V, so you won't need a converter since power in the Philippines is 220V but the plug may not match, which means that you may need a power plug adapter like this one to be able to plug it in. I would though check the Power Supply as to actual power ratings.


4

Wikipedia has some pretty extensive information about power standards around the world. According to this information, the Philippines uses types A, B, and C plugs: However, it operates at 220V, 60Hz. The US uses 120V 60Hz. So while your US plugs (Type A & B) will physically fit into the sockets in the Philippines, you need to be sure your ...


4

Firstly, look on your laptop's power unit/base/charger. Usually the fine print will give you a range - e.g. Rated input AC100-240V or something similar. If it matches the range required, then no power converter is required for you to be able to use it there. So, then it's down to the adapter (plug) and the voltage in the Philippines. You can use this ...


4

You would rather need a 220 to a 110 converter. I have been using this converter(on a daily basis for over a month now) in Australia (India and Australia have the same voltage/power levels I am told) and all my US appliances work well. It has a little bit of a fan noise in a very quiet room, but that doesn't bother me. Also, you need this only if your ...


4

You may be better off with a 220V certified rated charger, rather than converter. They should be freely interchangeable with 110V ones, as long as toothbrush is concerned. For Sonicare: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Philips-Sonicare-FlexCare-Toothbrush-Genuine/dp/B00DGTGTXY For Waterpik: http://waterpikukonline.co.uk/replacement-parts/wp-450-chargers The ...


4

Finnair generally use a fairly standard "universal" 2/3 prong power socket that will accept (at least) plugs with a US or European style plug, with power at 110 volts. Depending on the specific plane it may also have the even-more-universal socket that will also take UK, Australian, etc, plugs - however I would not recommend relying on that as not all ...



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