Hot answers tagged

49

This feature is becoming increasingly common in many establishments. In my opinion the purpose of such card-activated time switches is to reduce costs: the removal of the card ensures that some/all electronic appliances are turned off when the guest leaves the room, thus saving money to the hotel. Indeed guests are often given one card to access the room ...


27

I have seen these cards control everything including plugs (so annoying to leave your laptop charging while you go out for the day, and come back to find the plug was not on while you were gone) just lights but not plugs lights and air conditioner but not plugs just the air conditioner Whether it exists and what it controls seems to vary around the ...


15

While the other answers have elaborated on the primary reasons, I am going to point out what I perceive as a secondary reason and/or benefit: The key has its fixed place. To me as a hotel guest, this seems incredibly beneficial because it means the key does not lie around somewhere where I might forget it when leaving the room. Instead, it's in its fixed ...


15

General rule: read the sticker on the item you want to use, although in some cases it is a text area molded into the plastic of the transformer of the charger. Most laptops, phones, camera chargers and such these days are made to run off 100 as well as 240 volt, and can handle 50 as well as 60 hertz. If something is made to run on 240 volt, it will ...


11

Since 230V is in the range 100-240V, you do not need a transformer. You will probably need an adapter. Botswana doesn't seem to have a standard; can you find out what kind of plugs are in your hotel, or the business you're visiting? I would suggest bringing at least one adapter labeled Africa and a British one, but consider a universal adapter so you can ...


9

Yes you may. Modern auto-switching computer adaptors will happily work between all worldwide voltage ranges supplied to consumers. As you say yourself, the adaptor claims to work from as low as 100 volts between live and neutral (the Japanese standard) up to 240 volts (the old British standard*, although from time to time even on the German grid the ...


8

The concept of a "Type SE" seems to be a Japanese thing: the canonical list of plug types is maintained by the International Electrotechnical Commission, and they don't recognize it. The best source I could find, then, is this random Japanese site, which claims that Type SE is identical to the Type C, except that: Type SE plugs have may have a hole for a ...


7

Old question but I think the core of the right answer is still missing and since it's potentially a safety concern it may warrant another as answer. All step down transformers are rated for a certain power. If you exceed the rated power, bad things will happen. YOU MUST NEVER EXCEED THE RATED POWER. A hair straightener needs a lot of power and would ...


7

Yes, the German type plug will fit in there, if you look closely you will notice a curved notch in the outlet made for round pins. Check the end of the arrow: Actually, plugs with round pins are the standard in Qatar the country, along with the UK type.


5

In 2009, in an act of stupidity, corruption and bad faith, the brazilian governament created a new standard that's different from all other countries in the world: This image shows the brazillian standard at the bottom and the number of countries (paĆ­ses, in red) that use each other standard. That said, it is still very common to find the american ...


5

Based on the logo on the socket, this is an "EmPower" socket - which isn't surprising as they are the most common type of these sockets on airplanes. You can find a datasheet for these types of sockets here, that claims they are "Compatible with plugs from over 170 countries", and then specifically shows compatibility with multiple forms of 2-plug European ...


5

Some shavers may work with just an adapter. A clock may need a frequency converter, which is a far more expensive and bulky piece of equipment than the voltage converter you show here. Look at the existing power supply (i.e. the inline brick or "wall wart" plug used to plug into a US outlet). It will say the range of voltage it allows for input. If it says ...


5

Here's a canonical reference for Peter Green's answer (sorry, too long for a comment). Botswana uses Type D, Type G and Type M sockets. See: http://www.iec.ch/worldplugs/typeD.htm http://www.iec.ch/worldplugs/typeG.htm http://www.iec.ch/worldplugs/typeM.htm noting the panel to the right contains 'Botswana' in each case. These are specified here: ...


4

I can verify that the N700a trains have power sockets for the seats at the ends of the cars. Look at the bottom of the side wall under the window near your feet. Plugged in right now, actually :-)


4

Thanks to @Relaxed 's helpful comments I now know at least the power situation: right now you might find yourself on a train where only first class has power but this is changing and at some indefinite point in the future every seat will have power. Details: The SBB timetable change on 14 December 2014 says: From 14 December, passengers will be able to ...


4

A "Type C" adapter will work fine in Type E and Type F sockets. From AC power plugs and sockets: The separation and length of the pins allow its safe insertion in CEE 7/1, CEE 7/3 "Schuko", CEE 7/5, and most Israeli, Swiss, Danish and Italian sockets.


4

Although Germany uses Type F, in a few days visiting it I found a few outlets of C type. In Croatia almost every outlet is F type. Using a type C adapter would work on any case, as it has the same separation (19mm between the center of each pin) but thinner pins (4m vs 4.8mm). The only con is that it would fit a bit looser and will be easier to unplug it ...


4

My Surface Pro 3 has been to Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and most of the Pacific Ocean. All I need is the plug adapter (two prong) not a converter. It works just fine. Cell phone chargers, camera chargers etc are also happy with 240, 110, or anything in between as long as you get an adapter for the prongs.


4

Both Worldstandards.eu and the IEC maintain pages on the types of sockets in use around the world. The UK uses Type G almost universally (there's the odd exceptions of "Shaver sockets" in bathrooms and some hotels have a strange, round 3 pin setup for lighting only). So you need something that will take your Nowergian C/F plugs and convert them to G. You'll ...


4

Several quick rules of thumb: Almost everything has a sticker or imprint that lists the input voltage. Look at that. For the more electronics savvy: if you're just trying to do a quick inventory in your head you can usually just go on whether the device already requires voltage conversion. Computers, phones, and other things with charging batteries almost ...


4

The answer is unfortunately not as simple as stated by CMaster. If the device contains an AC motor directly driven by the mains voltage, reducing the mains frequency will indeed cause the motor to rotate slower, but it may also overload the motor. It is difficult to easily explain the physics behind this, but basically, a motor needs a larger magnetic core ...


3

The BS4573 plug is a standard British shaver plug and the socket looks like a multi-plug receptacle. It could be that someone crammed something in the outlet that was too big and bent the contacts inside so they don't grip. Or maybe they are just getting well used and lost some of their spring. You can try shining a flashlight into the socket to see if ...


3

The 15 minutes problem is most likely caused by a faulty motion detector. Many hotels use a motion detector to switch off the main lights when the guest is sleeping. You can sometime notice this after waking up, sometimes the motion detector has not been triggered and then the lights don't immediately work.


3

How about Coworking Salzburg? They rent coworking space for as little as 25EUR (as of writing), including a desk, power outlets and Wi-Fi. The location is not exactly central, but to be fair coworking spaces rarely are.


3

The thing you have to watch with bringing appliances with french and german style plugs into the UK is that most readilly available "visitor" adaptors will connect the live and neutral but not the earth. Also adaptors bought from dodgy sellers (in particular the likes of amazon marketplace) may well lack the fuse that is considered an important safety ...


3

Yes, you can. There is the list of prohibited objects in hand luggage according to EU regulations. As batteries are not listed you can carry them without further trouble.


3

Probably, but with care Although the EU security regulations don't prohibit spare batteries, there are separate safety restrictions. IATA regulations state that: Spare batteries < 100Wh are permitted in cabin baggage, but not in the hold. You can only carry two spare batteries between 100-160 Wh, again only in the cabin. Batteries over 160Wh are not ...


3

There are two things to mind, the shape of the plug and the voltage. Frequency sometimes matters for clocks and analog devices but less so with modern ones. The standard US plus is two flat prongs and optionally a rounded one for ground. This looks like the one shown top-left on your photo. Carefully read the specification on your device, those which ...


3

Your fan, or its power supply, should have a label on it indicating the acceptable power inputs. You should find something like: Input AC 120-240V 50-60Hz This gives the range of voltages and frequencies that are acceptable. If it says "50-60Hz" then you are OK at 50Hz. (Or any other range that includes 50Hz, but other ranges will be very rare.) If it ...


2

The problem is proper transformers tend to be heavy. If you had relocated to europe and wanted a permanent soloution to running american appliances I'd reccomend one of the "yellow brick" transformers they use on UK building sites. They are sturdilly built, are proper isolation transformers and have the power to run basically anything that comes with a ...



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