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17

Safety Disclaimer There are various way to do this, none of which are risk-free. Any damage to you, your personal property, nature, the Universe is entirely your fault. You Cannot Fully Charge Your Device The bottom line however is that you should avoid fully-charging the battery. Instead you should aim for a short charge, giving you enough juice to ...


9

Yes you may. Modern auto-switching computer adaptors will happily work between all worldwide voltage ranges supplied to consumers. As you say yourself, the adaptor claims to work from as low as 100 volts between live and neutral (the Japanese standard) up to 240 volts (the old British standard*, although from time to time even on the German grid the ...


9

Yes, it should work. Electricity supplies with nominal voltages of 220, 230 or 240 volts are in practice the same. There are tolerances of about ±10 % in the voltage (to account for the voltage drop in transmission lines which depends on the load), so devices labeled with either of these voltages will actually be designed to function on anywhere between 200 ...


6

Wikipedia has an article on all plugs used in all countries, with a table for comparison. Or for a picture version (albeit comparing them to Australian plugs, but at least it shows you) - this will show you what they look like. Basically, international outlet/plug types A and C, and they run at 220V/50Hz. Coming from the Netherlands, you will need an ...


6

Very much depends on the cruise ship, and it's often based on their country of origin. Here are some examples: in the help of P&O cruises (a British-American cruise line) : Oceana and Britannia also have US 2 pin sockets in addition to UK 3 pin sockets The standard electrical supply in the United Kingdom is 50HZ (cycles) and 240V. The supply on board ...


5

Yes, the socket delivers different voltage but electric appliances will support a range of voltages, and plug types C, E, F are compatible with the sockets. See http://www.worldstandards.eu/electricity/plug-voltage-by-country/


5

In 2009, in an act of stupidity, corruption and bad faith, the brazilian governament created a new standard that's different from all other countries in the world: This image shows the brazillian standard at the bottom and the number of countries (países, in red) that use each other standard. That said, it is still very common to find the american ...


4

India has a 230V 50Hz (voltage of 230 Volts, frequency of 50 Hertz) system. Therefore any electronics purchased for a country with this voltage and frequency will obviously work. However the situation in reality is much better than this. Almost all modern electronics is designed to work with a wide range of AC input voltages and frequencies, because they ...


4

Although Germany uses Type F, in a few days visiting it I found a few outlets of C type. In Croatia almost every outlet is F type. Using a type C adapter would work on any case, as it has the same separation (19mm between the center of each pin) but thinner pins (4m vs 4.8mm). The only con is that it would fit a bit looser and will be easier to unplug it ...


4

My Surface Pro 3 has been to Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and most of the Pacific Ocean. All I need is the plug adapter (two prong) not a converter. It works just fine. Cell phone chargers, camera chargers etc are also happy with 240, 110, or anything in between as long as you get an adapter for the prongs.


4

A "Type C" adapter will work fine in Type E and Type F sockets. From AC power plugs and sockets: The separation and length of the pins allow its safe insertion in CEE 7/1, CEE 7/3 "Schuko", CEE 7/5, and most Israeli, Swiss, Danish and Italian sockets.


3

How about Coworking Salzburg? They rent coworking space for as little as 25EUR (as of writing), including a desk, power outlets and Wi-Fi. The location is not exactly central, but to be fair coworking spaces rarely are.


3

You can use a US-style "type A" power strip in the UK, so long as some conditions are met: It must not have any components such as lamps or meters which are sensitive to the line voltage. Obviously the power strip will be seeing 220V instead of 120V, and some power strips do have lamps to indicate power being applied which could pose a problem if used ...


3

As I'm posting this from a French laptop plugged into a wall in a Moscow apartment, I can confirm that everything works perfectly without any need for adaptors.


3

It will depend on the ship. Cunard seems to have one US + one UK plug officially, and if you search around you find some more (by unplugging TV etc.), but they have tons of British customers. Other cruise ships might have US + European.


3

Contrary to Mark's post, you will likely not need an adapter coming from the Netherlands. Thailand uses both the round pin plugs common in Europe as well as the flat pin plugs common in the USA & Canada. The wall outlets here accommodate both style plugs, using sockets similar to the one shown in pnuts comment link - ...


3

The BS4573 plug is a standard British shaver plug and the socket looks like a multi-plug receptacle. It could be that someone crammed something in the outlet that was too big and bent the contacts inside so they don't grip. Or maybe they are just getting well used and lost some of their spring. You can try shining a flashlight into the socket to see if ...


3

Thanks to @Relaxed 's helpful comments I now know at least the power situation: right now you might find yourself on a train where only first class has power but this is changing and at some indefinite point in the future every seat will have power. Details: The SBB timetable change on 14 December 2014 says: From 14 December, passengers will be able to ...


3

240V will work fine. Mains voltage and anything that uses it will have tolerances of at least 6% (~14V for 240V). Making use of this, the Australian voltage change was mostly done on paper, since most actual Aussie electricity is still served at 240V. That said, please ensure that any devices you plug into your transformer are rated to use less than 1500W ...


3

Check whether your batteries are NiMh (or NiCd) or Lithium. Don't mix them, as they have different charging and discharging requirements. I assume you're not talking alkalines, and that you know you can't charge them :). Use the 5 V output of the panel, anything higher will risk to blow up your batteries. As it's probably USB, it should be also limited (or ...


2

Here's an adapter that does exactly what you want (it is type F, but type E will also fit AFAIK). If you can not get that adapter for any reason, you can always buy a separate grounding pin and install it (at your own risk), I would ask an electrician to do it.


2

I no longer have a Dell but it was rated 110-240V and 50-60Hz (multi-voltage) so it can handle the 220V in the Philippines. I used it in Australia and just needed to pack an Australian adapter. Your Dell likely has a plug with three prongs (grounded) so I'd suggest packing a three-pronged adapter; also pack a two-pronged (ungrounded) adapter just in case. ...


2

About cafes and such: A generally valid answer if a cafe has outlets near the tables won´t be possible, but nobody will have a problem if you just ask. More than "yes, there and there" or "no" won´t happen. This site lists some cafes, restaurants etc. with free WIFI: Afro Cafe, Bürgerspitalplatz 5 Altstadt Hotel Garni Trumer Stube, Bergstraße 6 ...


2

Air China seems to have a policy in place for the batteries (or generally termed power banks) 10000mAh should amount to 36WH or 50Wh depending on whether the batteries are rated 3.6V or 5V. However still, policy says that 2 batteries are allowed that shouldn't exceed 160Wh. EDIT: As identified by @DCTLib below, only two spare batteries are allowed in cabin ...


2

According to the SeatGuru page on Oman Air (you can click on the plane model to see the details), there are power outlets on some of the planes, notably their A330s, while the other models don't have power outlets. A330-200: There is regular AC power onboard: one power port per First and Business Class seat and one shared between two seats within ...


2

Both Oman Air Flight 124 from Munich to Muscat and Flight 815 from Muscat to Bangkok usually operate with an Airbus A330-200, which has power plugs in all classes (one per seat in First/Biz, one per two seats in Economy). Beware that aircraft types are never guaranteed, so you may end up on another plane with no notice. However, Oman Air's only other ...


1

Yes, your charger can accept 220 V mains power. You will need an adapter because the shape of the plug is very likely different. A simple adapter doesn't do anything to the voltage, it just offers a different shape of plug. (There are adapters that change voltage, but they are larger, more expensive, uncommon, and you don't need them for a laptop.) For ...


1

Trains from Zurich to Milan are serviced by a number of companies. For routes that start with InterCity trains, Wi-Fi is offered in 1st class. Source Routes using InterRegio have free Wi-Fi, RegioExpress trains may also have Wi-Fi, please confirm. Source I don't know about EuroCity trains.


1

If you use an adapter there is a trick for using several plugs(2 pins) with just one adapter. The third pin is just for "unlocking" socket so you can try to put in the adapter conversely and just plug in your two pin plug. Edit: As pointed out by CMaster in the comments you are deliberately circumventing a safety feature this way. You should only do this if ...


1

The Yubi Power Travel Battery Charger is small and lightweight making it a good choice for your travels.



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