Hot answers tagged

49

This feature is becoming increasingly common in many establishments. In my opinion the purpose of such card-activated time switches is to reduce costs: the removal of the card ensures that some/all electronic appliances are turned off when the guest leaves the room, thus saving money to the hotel. Indeed guests are often given one card to access the room ...


28

It's the same as the British one (Type G). (Type D) was once common and may be occasionally found. The voltage in Ireland is the same as the rest of Europe (220 volts). To be more specific, From Wikipedia: The British Standards 1363 plug[17] is used in the United Kingdom and other countries. Compatible plugs standards are IS 401 and IS 411 (Ireland), MS ...


27

I have seen these cards control everything including plugs (so annoying to leave your laptop charging while you go out for the day, and come back to find the plug was not on while you were gone) just lights but not plugs lights and air conditioner but not plugs just the air conditioner Whether it exists and what it controls seems to vary around the ...


26

No need for converters, your charger accepts anything form 100V to 240V. It is safe to use it anywhere in the world. Note that the output of AC-DC adapters will always be the same regardless of the input voltage.


20

Don't pack anything. You'll find much cheaper, and probably better, plug adapters all over India. Expect to pay Rs 15-30 for simple ones that just accommodate US-style plugs, and Rs 40-50 for full universal ones. You can find them at any general store/convenience store in major cities and tourist locations, but might get a better selection at electrician's ...


20

No exceptions. Wikipedia has a colourful map of mains voltage systems used around the world.


20

I used to 'get around this' technicality by asking at the info desks at airports where there might be a power point to charge my laptop etc, even if I'd spotted some. They'd usually helpfully point out one, or say 'oh just use any you find'. That way I figured I'd be able to argue being covered if it came down to security yelling at me or worse. I've also ...


19

There are essentially two ways to check if your appliance or its charger work on 220V. Usually the fine print on the adapter will give the range, saying something like: "Rated input:AC 100-240V". If the voltage of the country falls in the range specified, you will be fine. If you can't find the voltage on the charger, try downloading the instruction manual ...


19

Your laptop and phone chargers are designed to operate at a voltage between 100 - 240 V. Your electric shaver on the other hand may not be able to handle the different voltages and will not work in the USA. Unfortunately for the electric shaver, you are stuck with 220V. The best way to make sure is to check on the device or its power supply. An example of ...


19

I've had two battery packs / power banks, and travelled to several countries with several airlines, taking them as carry on, without any problem...until... Last year, I flew from Tokyo Haneda, via Beijing, China to Vancouver, Canada. In Beijing, Chinese officials sent me to a security point, where several people including myself had our power banks taken ...


18

In India, a lot of plug sockets look like this they seem to accept plug types from most countries. It's a shame you can't find these everywhere.


18

Yes, this will work, although you'll need an adapter plug to be able to plug your charger into a European socket. Actually, you don't really need your charger as any regular USB port will do. So if you have your laptop with you, you only need your laptop charger (for which you will also need an adapter plug). A universal travel adapter is something which ...


17

Traveling with a power-strip is an old trick for avoiding to carry multiple plug adaptors, but going from the US to Europe you need to be a little careful. Electricity in the US is ~110 volts, whilst in much of the rest of the world it's 200-250 volts. Although power boards/power strips are generally passive, and thus the number of volts should not have ...


17

Safety Disclaimer There are various way to do this, none of which are risk-free. Any damage to you, your personal property, nature, the Universe is entirely your fault. You Cannot Fully Charge Your Device The bottom line however is that you should avoid fully-charging the battery. Instead you should aim for a short charge, giving you enough juice to ...


16

My personal view is that it's easier to ask forgiveness than permission. Most people working there won't give a rat's * about you using a powerpoint, save perhaps for security, but at most they'll just tell you to move along. I do a lot of travel, airports, bus stations, train stations, and my eye is always looking subconciously for power sockets now ;) ...


16

Bath, like the rest of Britain, uses standard British plugs with three rectangular prongs, known to a few as BS 1363. If you've heard somewhere about Britain having different plugs in Bath, you (or whoever told you that) may have misheard: Britain uses different plugs in bathrooms. British electrical safety regulations are very tight, and normal outlets ...


15

When power outlets were first installed on airliners, they used a special adapter called EmPower, which looked like this: The airlines obviously thought that frequent flyers would be happy to buy a new kind of adapter for all their gizmos. This turned out not to be entirely true... nobody wanted to buy these new stupid adapters, and the airlines ...


15

It's not theft. Unless otherwise noted, intentionally blocked, or obviously intended for some other purpose (e.g. to plug in an ATM), the outlets in the waiting area are specifically there for passenger convenience. In fact, airliners and airports are specifically expanding this functionality for more people to take advantage of; Omaha's Eppley Airfield ...


15

While the other answers have elaborated on the primary reasons, I am going to point out what I perceive as a secondary reason and/or benefit: The key has its fixed place. To me as a hotel guest, this seems incredibly beneficial because it means the key does not lie around somewhere where I might forget it when leaving the room. Instead, it's in its fixed ...


15

General rule: read the sticker on the item you want to use, although in some cases it is a text area molded into the plastic of the transformer of the charger. Most laptops, phones, camera chargers and such these days are made to run off 100 as well as 240 volt, and can handle 50 as well as 60 hertz. If something is made to run on 240 volt, it will ...


14

Indonesia uses European-style two-pin round plugs ('C'-type is the most common variant found): Voltage is at 220 V 50 Hz (as opposed to 110 V 60 Hz in US). Most modern electronic equipment that has auto-sensing capability should work without needing a voltage converter, you will need a plug adapter though which can buy cheap online. As for Apple products ...


14

The fourth line of text on the device (counting those two lines on the top right) says: EINGANG 230V~50Hz 4W where 'Eingang' is German for 'input', '230V~50Hz' means '230Volts AC at 50Hz' and 4W is the maximum power. Since the US mains have a voltage of 120V and a frequency of 60Hz, you will need a transformer, but then the device will work.


14

There are limits that were introduced by the US Federal Aviation Administration. Those have been used as well by numerous other airlines, for example Cathay Pacific. They generally impose a limit on capacity per passenger and on top of this disallow checking them in, so you must take them into your hand luggage. If a website lists grams of Lithium, use this ...


13

I agree with @R.. I spent over four months in Delhi in 2009, and while I did bring over a couple of plug adapters with me, it's much easier and cheaper to just buy them there. Any market will have them. (Just remember that the price of almost anything in India is negotiable!) In addition to buying a couple of plug adapters, you can also purchase a universal ...


13

I've used the power in a lot of airports, including YYZ, and never been told not to or even glared at. A few tips: They have to vaccuum the place. Look for power and you'll see it In the gate area the plugs are often in the floor. You might have to pry up a cover. Again, no-one seems to mind. When they're not in the floor, they're in the concrete columns ...


13

Speaking from personal experience: Firstly, I assume I'll be spending some of that time in customs, getting my bag, being searched, probed and whatnot. If you are a US citizen, you'll probably spend about an hour with immigration and customs. If you're not, wait times could be up to four hours during a busy period, and that assumes you're not ...


13

Cuba uses type A and B 110V, 60Hz power. So you can expect to see the following two types: This is the same as the United States. UK plugs will not work without a method of converting.


12

According to this image atleast: http://www.360cities.net/image/amtrak-roomette-sleeper-california-zephyr-2007#424.41,0.66,20.0 if you look into the other room http://www.360cities.net/image/amtrak-roomette-sleeper-california-zephyr-2007#553.27,12.12,20.0 you can even see a a macbook beeing charged.


12

It's very hard to make a universal socket that's compliant with all the safety standards that would apply. Eg in the UK BS 1363 sockets must have shutters over the L and N holes and plugs must be fused. The simple answer, if you are travelling to many countries, is often to take your domestic power strip but change the plug on it to a IEC 60320 inlet. This ...


12

No, you can't. They're different types of adapters. What I do when I need confirmation is to check this website: http://www.worldstandards.eu/electricity.htm It has an EXHAUSTIVE list of each and every type, the voltage and the countries that use them. It's been handy for some of the stranger countries I've been to and hasn't failed yet. Myself, I have ...



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