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2

TL;DR Both Auschwitz camps are open for individual tourists. No reservations can be made, and buildings are closed and routes shortened. It is still worth visiting the camps. Due to the excellent answer by Andrew, I took the gamble and travelled to Oswiecim (Auschwitz). I was actually able to enter both Auschwitz I (the smaller camp near the city) and ...


1

For Poland, it depends on the season of course, if you plan to visit Gdansk during the weekend or holidays (anytime in July and August) I doubt you'll find anything cheap anywhere on whole Polish coast. This year, due to well-spread terrorism in Egypt, Turkey, Tunisia, etc., most Polish people chose to visit Polish seaside and it was all booked long before ...


3

You are planning to travel during the school holidays in the area, many hotels and hostels will be full to the gills. But if you are willing to spend a few minutes every evening to book accommodation for the next night, you are likely going to be able to stay in or very near to the main cities. Taking Amsterdam as an example, the city is often booked out, ...


5

The Jewish Quarter of Kraków is a major destination in and of itself, including a restored synagogue and a museum. It's also a center of nightlife. There are probably more Jewish-themed restaurants than resident Jews in the city. I also recommend the city for non-Judaism-related tourism. The central square is one of the best I've seen, for sitting out and ...


1

It sounds like your phone is Blocked in Poland ie reported as lost or stolen: Blacklists of stolen devices This has nothing to do with your provider, your phone(s) might work without any problems in other countries. If your phone(s) was/were SIM-Locked you would get a different message before loading the home screen, something like the this I am afraid ...


3

It sounds like your phone is SIM-locked: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/SIM_lock This is imposed by the operator you bought the phone from, and has nothing to do with Poland. Contact your home operator and see if they can unlock it for you. This is usually a paid service.


3

for what it's worth: Poland reinstituted border controls recently to last for a month (several large events occuring in Poland over the next few weeks). to be honest, I never ever heard about a thing called a notarized letter -- in my time, once you got an ID (usually at 16), you where more or less free to travel, although some kind of writ from your ...


4

Because this is an internal Schengen flight, you will not be subject to a systematic check of your travel document by Danish or Polish officials. Therefore, restrictions or requirements that arise because you are a minor will only be enforced by the airline. Call the airline and ask them what documents you will need to board the plane.


5

The page you link to seems to have some of the information you need: In addition to their own valid travel document (passport or ID card), although not obligatory by law, all minors entering or leaving Poland are strongly advised to carry a letter of parental consent if travelling alone or with adults other than their parents. The document ...



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