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6

Google Maps is your friend when it comes to public transport in the Bay Area. Just plug in your start and end, and it'll give you multiple options. Specifically for your route, it will depend a little on the exact time of day, but will start with catching the (free!) VTA 10 bus from the Airport to Santa Clara Caltrain Station (be careful to get the one ...


1

Last summer I was in Thailand for 3 weeks with my family. I'm 18, my family members are little brother, 12 and parents, 50+. We only bought the flights and hotel. However, from a friend's recommendation, we found a marvelous local guide. She didn't even ask for payments for the city tours, and she was happy to arrange trips to great sightseeings. Pretty ...


9

Important: Items marked with * must be done not only for your destination country, but also for any countries you are transiting through! Legal ☐ * Visa — Check to see if you need a visa to visit/transit in the destination country. ☐ * Immunization — Check to see if you need to get vaccines before you travel to the destination country. ☐ Proof of Onward ...


2

First I'm Thai and I'm from Bangkok so I know the cost of living there pretty well. You can get an 'OK' apartment around 4,000 - 5,000 bath around Lad Prao MRT or somewhere further and you can walk. It's going to be very expensive if you want to find somewhere around 'Siam' or 'Si Lom' because it's quite central. For the safety, I would say it depends if ...


5

Most people skiing for the first time choose a ski package, where you get accomodation, lift tickets (skiing admission as you put it) and maybe meals and transport in one package. The big benefit is that everything is simplified for you - you know you are getting what you need. It also guarantees that the hotel is suitable for skiing and close enough to the ...


2

In my office, we try to evaluate these costs when we send people overseas to make sure that the incomes are comparable. We do not want that people are worse off because of high rental costs or higher tax burden. After working on this for many years, the conclusion is that this is extremely difficult and complicated for people who stay longer in a country, ...


1

I think you should start by looking at these several websites which could help you compare the cost of living in one city in comparison to another. The best one I have found and used for my travels (it has been quite accurate in its findings) is Expatistan. Another good site is Numbeo. They have also provided me with resonable numbers in the past. Even ...


3

First of all these websites, backed up by the GDSes as Stephen said, do not have a very good coverage of hotels. There are still plenty of hotels to aggregate. And for hotels, getting aggregated usually means stricter conditions on their prices (little flexibility and high fee). And the main reason is that most hotels are not owned by large companies but ...


3

I think the answer depends widely on where you are looking. The way I have done this before, is by checking google maps, and doing a simple Google search. Often a simple google search will reveal hotel web sites, reviews, and simple travel blogs which make mention of hotels not listed on aggregate web sites. Simply search for hotels in <target ...


2

That's tricky! If you have more money than time, remember that you might spend a whole 2 days looking for better rates to only save $10/night. Sure, I hate over paying. But I could have earned the difference by doing something that makes me money. With that said, if you have more time than money: The major factor depends on if the hotel is integrated into a ...


1

If you haven't already done so, switch to electronic billing (get your bills delivered by email). This saves on paper, creates a history of your billing and allows you to get your bills anywhere you are. I'm in Australia, so things may be different in the US, but pretty much all utilities here do electronic billing, and indeed many charge extra if you want ...


1

The "fast lane" is for people with prepaid tickets, so if you buy a ticket before you get there you're set. Of course a lot of people do just that so the fast lane at peak times may not be that fast :) Very early is usually good. Be there just around the time they open if you can. From other tourist attractions in the area (I've not myself visited ...


2

If all else is not possible (variable amount to pay and no way to know how much without the letter in the mail and no one to read it to you). Then you should call the company receiving your money and tell them you will be on holiday for a month and may miss the due date. They will then be able to extend the due date and/or let you pay a part earlier. ...


3

One day seems reasonable, but if you get bored easily, you can spend only half a day. It is very beautiful in Keukenhof, and not too crowded to enjoy the view. No, the line was not too long when we visited. One day seems a bit of a stretch though, depending on what time you want to get there. 3/4 is more like it, but it depends on a person.


3

Living close to the Keukenhof I would suggest you come early in the morning, spend as much time in the garden as you like, and then check all of the flower fields around the Keukenhof. A full day should be enough even on busy days.


4

The garden is huge and I spent more than 3 hours inside because I wanted to see everything. You can skip the ticket queue by buying your ticket online. The problem with a day trip is only the drive to the place. It took me longer than it should have been because of the heavy traffic once I was almost there. But a day trip is still doable, especially if you ...


4

It's not that bad, coming around midday and spending a few hours is perfectly doable. There will be some waiting at the entrance and a lot of walking but you can see a lot in, say, 3 hours. To give you a baseline, I have been to both type of attractions several times and often waited much longer at Amsterdam's main museums. Buying the tickets online can also ...


3

I've not done it, I wouldn't have thought you'd have needed to book for in advance. I certainly hadn't heard of that, but Wikivoyage says: If you decide to go solo, you can only buy tickets for the Underground River tour in their office in Puerto Princessa as that is the only place to get a permit. There is a limited amount of people allowed each day ...


3

The Faroe Islands are officially part of Denmark (albeit self-governing). According to Wikivoyage, it's legal to hitch in Denmark, apart from on motorways: Destination boards are recommended. For safety reasons, it is illegal to hitchhike on the expressways, so it is better to use the on ramps and service areas. When crossing by ferry, try to get ...


7

From FaroeIslands.com: Camping There are no public wilder­ness or common areas in the Faroes. As a consequence, camping is only permitted at designated camp­sites (See page 88). Moreover, it is not permitted to stay overnight in your camp­ing cars along the road, at rest stops, lay-bys or view areas. Be aware that many camping sites are ...



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