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35

Lake Quill, New Zealand. source: Microsoft Community


30

It sounds pretty similar to museums. Copyright isn't actually an issue for old works and should not concern the museum in any case (if some work is copyrighted, that's your problem if you do publish a reproduction, the museum does not need to enforce it on behalf of others). This leaves several potential reasons: Avoiding people standing in the way/slowing ...


28

This is the sort of waffle that marketing people are very good at generating. It is positive in all the right ways, and negative in all the right ways. It's clever. Is it catchy? Yes. Is it carefully modest? Yes. (Note that it's not the MOST photographed.) Is it a slogan? Yes. Is it possible to disprove? No/unlikely. Are people likely to question it? No. ...


28

Being Dutch, I have never heard of such law. I also doubt there is a law that would cover this, I would take it as a try to intimidate you. But also as a 'please really, really do not do this.' If caught out after you made the picture and before you had seen the sign, I would let them try to sue you. But if seeing the sign before you take the picture, do ...


22

I LOVE taking photos in Hong Kong. I have taken many photos in mainland China and in Hong Kong and a few other Asian countries - HK has a special "flavour" of its own. The answers to your 3 questions are "many places" in each case :-) - but there are some specialist ones. You will find mixes of all sorts of things all over. The really and genuinely old is ...


22

I am willing to contest the basic premise: despite several claims online, I won't accept that this train station is the second most photographed building in the southern hemisphere. That said, perhaps it depends on how you stretch the definition of 'building'. Not exactly scientific, but hard numbers nonetheless, I searched Flickr for... "machu picchu": ...


20

In grand summary (and standing upon the shoulders of all the other contributors!), photography restrictions (with or without flash) are frequently enforced at locations for the following reasons and needs; (in no particular order) Security National – Military installations/Anti-Spying etc. Local – High value exhibits on display. Protective Privacy – ...


19

Sometimes it is due to delays, we did some tours of old buildings in Turkey, due to the weak floors they would only allow a limited number of people in at a time. The next tour could not go in until all the people from the current tour had left. The tour guild made it clear that no photos should be taken, as it slows down the tour too much. Even so, some ...


17

One of the simplest, cleanest and cheapest solutions that I've seen is a couple I met who were travelling around South America. They'd back up onto a second SD card as well. When a card was full, they'd simply put it in an envelope and mail it home. Very cheap and very easy, and pretty reliable. Send it registered mail if you don't trust it. Once their ...


17

Besides the already stated reasons there may be another one. Some types of light are highly harmful to paintings, photos, wood etc. For instance, the type of light Museums use in their rooms and in particular over art pieces is one of their concerns. The reasons may vary from place to place. Flash light can be aggressive: If thousands of persons take ...


16

For general communist architecture I would start at Alexander Platz and walk down the 'Karl-Marx-Allee' all the way to 'Frankfurter Tor' in Friedrichshain. There is nothing super special there, but the street was used for the big parades and still has a bit of an 'East German' feeling to it. As for bunkers, there are still many around, some of them from the ...


16

At 1,016ft, The Shard is the tallest building in Western Europe. If you're planning a trip to London after February 2013, the 360° viewing gallery on the 68th-72nd floors should be open. This panorama captures the northern half of the view at present, though it will change as some of the half dozen major skyscrapers under construction in the centre of the ...


16

St Paul's is a great start, the views are amazing. Primrose Hill while not a tall building does offer a free panoramic view of London from the north. If i recall correctly you can see the Gherkin, London eye and BT tower. Tower 42 has a champagne/wine bar on the 42nd floor and a restaurant on the 24th floor. You usually need to book for the bar, but ...


16

We went to Empire State Building during our Christmas season (2012) trip to NYC. I carried a small digital camera in addition to my phone which had a camera. My girlfriend carries a Nikon digital camera D50 with exchangeable lenses, and also a camera in her smartphone. Security checked the camera equipment without difficulty. I was completely unaware that ...


16

The word you are looking for is haikyo (廃墟, "ruin"), and Japan has plenty of them for pretty much every conceivable category of building... except temples and shrines. Unlike corporate enterprises that get abandoned as soon as they stop making money, temples and shrines were never intended as money-making enterprises in the first place, so their costs are ...


16

It is Annecy in France. And you can see on the picture le Palais de l'Isle.


15

Buy a gun. No really. You can buy a Starter Pistol (you know, the kind used to signal the beginning of a race) for under fifty bucks. According to TSA regulations, any case which contains a firearm is inspected at the time of check-in, and then locked and tracked in transit. This means that your bag will not be searched except under your direct supervision, ...


14

Here are some places. Hong Kong is sometimes tricky to shoot because things are in most cases too close up for the size they have. It's not easy shooting 40-floor high buildings when you are standing in front of them. I find my 15mm fish-eye very helpful at times. Mong Kok: VERY dense place, lots of small shops Causeway bay, specially around Sogo and Times ...


14

There are no specific regulations against taking photos during take off and landing - as long as you are not endangering the crew and passengers. Each airline, however is free to have their own policies. For example some will not allow cameras with external battery packs. For more detailed discussion on this, check out this post on photo.stackexchange.com. ...


14

The image was taken at Pontet Lake, located at 45.051247, 6.351562. The author is Florian Blondeau. Here's another image of the lake by the same photographer:


14

In general, in the US it is legal to take photographs in any "public" property (eg, streets, parks, etc), unless it is somewhere that there would be an expectation of privacy (eg, toilets or changing rooms, etc). However shops and shopping centers are not "public" property, they are private property that is opened to the public and the rules are thus a ...


13

Always ask before taking a photo - unless they won't know if you take it. That's not supposed to sound creepy, but sometimes you're say, taking a photo of the Eiffel Tower and someone happens to be in the shot, so that's fine. NEVER pay money for a photo. It encourages begging, or harassment. Ask permission, and if they say no or want money for it, offer ...


12

I was back-packing in Latin America for 20 months and took my camera everywhere. But it was only a 400 dollar point and shot which fits in my trouser pocket. I used that camera everywhere maybe except inside the favelas in Brazil. Some friends of mine had bigger SLRs with them and used them a lot too. In Bolivia I met a guy who was there for National ...


12

If you do not have a tripod, bipod, monopod, or any other bulky equipment which will create an impediment or disturbance to the other guests, you should be allowed in. I've been up literally hundreds of times, and though I can't speak for them, I've a good feeling as to what they allow and prohibit.


12

Regarding the eiffel tower: Image rights / the Eiffel Tower brand By day, the sun light and the eiffel tower are in public domain, you can take it in picture and publish / try to sell the pictures as you want. By night, the eiffel tower artistic lighting is under copyright if it's the main subject of the picture. I think if it's for your little blog ...


12

@travelot clearly laid out the most relevant rules but I would like to clarify something and highlight an important distinction: There is – to my knowledge – no general restriction on taking pictures of the Eiffel tower (the police might ask you to stop taking pictures, e.g. if you are disturbing traffic and the like but that's something else). The issues ...


11

Alexandra palace has some nice views: Centrepoint tower which has a club/restaraunt at the top: Views from there:


11

One option is the Tate Modern. On the 5th floor is a small coffee shop or cafe, publicly accessible and free to gain access. It has a great view looking north over the Thames towards St Paul's and Central London. Another option that costs is the London Eye. It takes 30 minutes to complete a revolution, and I recommend it both during the day and at night ...


11

Japan, birthplace of the camera phone, is relatively photo-friendly if you are taking candid pictures for your personal use with your own camera (i.e. not for publication or resale and not using a tripod or professional equipment). Places where photography is expressly forbidden will be marked by signs. By and large, these are the same places where you can ...


10

My favourite communist architecture in Berlin is definitely the Frankfurter Tor and the rest of the "Stalinallee ensemble". Frankfurter Tor: Thanks to Wikipedia and Wikimedia Commons Stalinallee / Karl-Marx-Allee: Thanks to Wikipedia and Wikimedia Commons Building on Stalinallee / Karl-Marx-Allee: My own photo I'm not sure if this is exactly what you ...



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