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14

You can, but the travel is a bit on the unconventional side. Most shipping companies will accept passengers at a relatively cheap rate and you can just tag along. I live in Manila, my father in law runs one such company, my brother in law is a cook for another. There are some caveats: You're surrounded by 'salty sailors', which may or may not be ...


8

It depends on who you ask, basically. The latest report I can find states that it's "safe to drink - for now". The water quality is managed by The Manila Water Company, and they do monthly checks of over 1000 samples. However, it's also worth noting the article points out that during rainy season, the risk of contamination is higher from pipes being ...


8

Personally I'd try and do what the locals do, and use their transport - it'll be more fun and you'll meet people that you wouldn't get to if you were driving your own car. Plus you won't get lost, and you'll be able to look around and enjoy what you're seeing. According to perennial favourite Wikitravel, vans (or L3s as they are called there) cost about 80 ...


7

Clark itself is not worth visiting. Until 1991 the area used to be an American air force base: 'Clark Air Base', now its an airport which some budget airlines use. The area is also a free trading zone: Clark Freeport Zone, but not really interesting for tourists, unless you are into old US military installations. The main reason to fly to Clark, is that is ...


7

The short answer is none. The brunt of Haiyan's impact was on the islands of Leyte and Samar, neither of which is really a tourist destination. Cebu, which is, only sustained relatively minor damage, and places outside the Visayas like Manila and Palawan came through virtually unscathed.


6

In general I would always arrive in a country with a least a little local currency (if it's legal to do so, which it isn't always but is in the Philippines). There's been a couple of times I've been close to stranded on arrival because I didn't. You probably need money to get from the airport (unless you've pre-arranged transport), and exchanging money in ...


6

Offically, yes the liquid rules are in effect, the Manila International Airport Authority has a Liquids, Aerosols and Gels page but it's a mirror on a numeric IP address so I can't link it. This is the Main Site, click FAQ from there. From that page: What is the best advice to get me through security as smoothly as possible? Pack all liquids into ...


6

It is against the regulations which ask for 6 month validity but allow discretion for validity down to 60 days. Since the passport in question expires less than 30 after your arrival, entry will most likely be refused. For emergency reasons, your consulate may provide service to renew the passport faster than the usual delay. I would call them immediately ...


6

All you have to do is contact a travel agency to file the paperwork on your behalf several months before you plan to enter the country. If coming for business, the company you are visiting (or their attorney) can also file the paperwork for you. The program is designed to make it extremely easy to enter the country, and it has been working rather well. If ...


6

For that amount of money the best solution is almost always going to be to do a wire transfer from your UK bank (or possibly your Spanish bank) to your Philippines bank. There will frequently be a charge on each end of the transfer, but it's normally negated by the fact that you'll get a good exchange rate for the transfer - normally far better than you'll ...


5

I believe you'll be able to take 2 bottles with you. According to World of Duty Free (who are one of the big UK airport based duty free companies, so ought to know...) The following items may be imported into the Philippines without incurring customs duty: (snip tobacco bits, not relevent) 2L of alcoholic beverage, in bottles of not more than ...


5

Boracay is nice, but yes - it's highly commercialized. You won't be able to walk 20 meters on a beach without someone approaching you and trying to sell you something. Chinese new year is a very popular holiday, so yes - it's going to be quite crowded and extremely loud. Remember, you can buy fireworks here legally, and quite cheaply. During the celebration, ...


4

Firstly, look on your laptop's power unit/base/charger. Usually the fine print will give you a range - e.g. Rated input AC100-240V or something similar. If it matches the range required, then no power converter is required for you to be able to use it there. So, then it's down to the adapter (plug) and the voltage in the Philippines. You can use this ...


4

Wikipedia has some pretty extensive information about power standards around the world. According to this information, the Philippines uses types A, B, and C plugs: However, it operates at 220V, 60Hz. The US uses 120V 60Hz. So while your US plugs (Type A & B) will physically fit into the sockets in the Philippines, you need to be sure your ...


4

Later model Dell laptops have power supplies rated 110 - 240V, so you won't need a converter since power in the Philippines is 220V but the plug may not match, which means that you may need a power plug adapter like this one to be able to plug it in. I would though check the Power Supply as to actual power ratings.


4

Usually May is a peak season because of the summer in the Philippines. Many people go to Boracay or Bagiuo. Bagiuo is the best place to go because of the cool area. It is colder than most places in the Philippines. Should you book a room in advance? Well it depends what you are planning to do and where. Booking in advance gives you usually a better price ...


4

Quoting the Bureau of Immigration, Philippines about the procedure for extension of VISA. Please note that this information is valid for extension of all kind of Visa, and not specific to a certain category. How would I extend my visa? You may get an application form from the Visa Extension Section located at the ground floor Annex building, ...


4

EDIT: Just called up the Keelung port in Taiwan. The operator is closed. I heard they were supposed to resume operation but did not. Please ignore my previous post about the ferry being back up. I used to know a guy who would bring people from the Philippines up to Taiwan through Koahsuing. It is possible, but you need to be careful. A lot of the people ...


4

What you're looking for is, in fact, a fully furnished condo with all utilities included available for extremely short term lease. They are rather abundant in Makati city, but they will be advertised in random places. These are investment properties maintained to fill the exact need that you have, and you will often be doing business with an agent of the ...


3

Well I don't like to answer my own question but I found a blog with some information about tourist guide on the Philippines.. with the plus of two of them fluent in Spanish.. http://celdrantours.blogspot.co.uk/2005/07/pause-pause-pause.html


3

None. Boracay is an island, with no land connection to the island where Manila is on. But I assume now you knew that. So let's find the next possible way. Renting vehicles might be a challenge since you will not return them at the place where you got them. So you will have to take buses, trains and ferries. If you want to shorten the water travel as much ...


3

You can fly from Mindanao to Cebu and then to Tacloban instead. Tickets from Cebu are about 150$. From there you can take a public bus or jeepneys to Catbalogan. You can also rent a car there with driver for 100$/day. While this is not a direct transport either, its surely better than the 12 hours boat from Cebu. Tacloban might also be the better place to ...


3

Yes, it can come from either a business or an individual. Several nationalities require an invitation for the Philippines. It's common, and other countries (Uzbekistan, Russia) often ask for it too. If you don't know someone there, there are often companies that will send you an invitation for a fee (crazy, but common). However, if you do know someone ...


3

In general Filipinos are almost universally nice to everyone, there are some exceptions with older people and certain countries (Japan, basically). Many people from the US retired or work here and Filipinos will generally show deference to any westerner and treat them politely. Most Filipinos I know are aware of the history but it doesn't really colour their ...


3

I've not done it, I wouldn't have thought you'd have needed to book for in advance. I certainly hadn't heard of that, but Wikivoyage says: If you decide to go solo, you can only buy tickets for the Underground River tour in their office in Puerto Princessa as that is the only place to get a permit. There is a limited amount of people allowed each day ...


3

You have a Philippine passport, that means Philippine immigration will let you in. They're not really going to care how you got there and they'll not look at the tickets. Philippines customs might care where you came from but they're unlikely to look at the tickets either. The problem is persuading the airline to let you on the flight. They get charged if ...


2

Tipping can be a little weird here, in general restaurants will add 10% service charge and not expect much else (if they don't add it feel free to leave 10%). Over and above this people often leave some of the change from the bill to round up to the nearest 100 pesos or something. Bars don't generally expect a tip (i.e. it's not like the US) but feel free ...


2

Clark US Air force Base was used a lot at the time of the Vietnam war. It was a stop off for American GI's debrifing and transition solders back into the world as we new it then. It has nothing much to do there, so don't expect much to do if you go there.


2

I've been trying to answer this for several years and I don't have a definitive answer but here are the options I've come up with and some comments: Freighter travel, this is covered in the other answer and I have no good leads for who to talk to but it seems the most likely option although it'll be long. Cruise, some cruises stop by Manila (although you ...


1

The closest place that I can find in the area is the town of Bislig, which also has it's own Airpot. There are 3 hotels in the town, all available on Tripadvisor. From there it's only a 30 minute car ride to the river. Next closest larger city would be Butuan City, from where it's 1.46 hours to drive. There, you do not have more hotels, but the quality ...



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