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0

Yes you can. You'd be better off finding a bureau de change though. Bureaux de change will usually be able to do the card transaction in euros and as a general rule have better exchange rates than ATMs.


3

Yes, you can. Maestro Cards work with every ATM in Switzerland. The currency of the card doesn't matter. The fees depends on the issuing institute (bank). ATMs of the Swiss Post (the yellow ones) charge an extra fee.


4

Indonesian ATMs generally won't let you withdraw more than 25 banknotes at a time. Since the largest denomination is only Rp. 100,000, this means 25 x 100k = 2.5 million. See eg. the Bank Mandiri FAQ. It's worth remembering that there are parts of Indonesia where the legal minimum wage barely crosses 1 million per month, not to mention all the people in ...


4

You will not have problems to find ATMs in China, the only problem is if your bank card can be used inside ATMs of a specific chinese bank (like Merchants Bank, ICBC, Bank of China). For example I can use my debit card only at ICBC and Bank of China ATMs, it's not accepted in other banks (also if they display the logo of my debit card)


2

You can bring Dollars or Euros with you while visiting South Korea. You can also use master card in shopping in South Korea.


4

Bring whatever suits you best. If you live in the Euro area there is no point in converting Euros into Dollars to convert them later into Won. You will loose twice from the exchange. Euros can as easily be exchanged into Wons as Dollars can be. Buying Won in Europe can be cumbersome and is not worth the effort. Credit cards (MasterCard and Visa) are also ...


-2

Note - you need a chip. As many have mentioned, card machines and ATMs in europe - I think - mostly (all?) need the modern chip-type card. You need one, so get one. "Can I get by In Paris and Rome by carrying very little cash and using the credit card for every little souvenir, tour and food purchase? Or should I prefer paying in cash for both Paris and ...


4

In France, cards are widely accepted anywhere (and not more in Paris than in rural areas), but in small shops there's often a limit on the amount. In Paris the card is generally refused for anything less than 15€, sometimes 20€ but that's in extreme cases. In rural areas, the limit is more often around 10€. I live in France, and I almost never carry more ...


5

I just got back from a 2 week vacation in Venice, Rome, Amalfi Coast, and Paris on Monday. First, note that Espressos/Coffee/Pastries, are generally pretty inexpensive in Italy at about 0,50€ - 1,50€. We never even tried paying for something that cheap with a credit card, and I don't think you should either. We used a couple personal drivers, and they all ...


4

There are two modes for them charging a card. "Card holder present" and "Card holder not present". Obviously if you aren't there you can't enter your PIN so they waive that requirement for that mode.


5

Be aware that many places in France will not take a credit card if it doesn't have a chip on it. These cards are not that common in the US, but are in Europe. I was able to just call AmEx and get a new card that has a chip, and I believe many US banks will now issue them if you ask.


0

Are you coming from the US? Is your vacation date at least a few months in the future? If so, you might be able to save a little money by buying your euros now, or dollar-cost averaging them between now and the time you depart. The exchange rate is pretty favorable right now. It hasn't been this good in about ten years. If you do this, you'll be paying ...


6

Traveling to France (mostly Paris) and Italy (Rome, Venice, Sorrento) I mostly pay my day-to-day expenses (local transport, lunch, souvenirs...) with cash. Bigger expenses (mostly restaurants) with my Credit card. I usually keep 60 to 100 euro with me all the time; I keep 20-ish euro in my front pocket and the rest in the wallet in my back pocket (not ...


1

Always have some cash on hand, enough to pay for the restaurant if they don't accept your cards or any cards at all. Spread the money among people in your travel group. Warn your bank so they don't block your cards and bring two different cards if you have them (some circuits like american express aren't accepted everywhere, mastercard or visa are very ...


10

In France you can almost always pay with a credit card but for small amounts (say up to €10,) cash is often preferred. In Paris cards are a little more often accepted than in small towns off the tourist track. I have not been in Italy, so not in Rome, but I have heard the same for there. Get some cash and use your card for the bigger payments. If you are ...


0

I am in a small village in Germany right now and my Spanish Debit card (MC) only works to get money from the bank and in some major restaurants. No supermarkets or small bars accept it.


1

You don't need the chip. I have an Indonesian card and it is a simple swipe card. However, do not rely too much on this option. Communication networks often fail and ATM are often empty. Try to always keep some cash available.


3

No, not all taxis will take credit cards, similar to other countries. Once you leave the major metropolitan areas (i.e. Tokyo or Kyoto), some will be cash only. A friendly reminder, is be wary about using a credit card when visiting another country as the card company may add extra fees for transactions in different currencies. Another thing I've noticed ...


9

No, it's not "always" an option. Most taxis do take credit cards, and specifically in Tokyo virtually all do; but some don't, so you can't rely on this. Minimum fares of up to ¥5000 may also apply. One interesting alternative is transport smart cards: most visitors to Japan will have a Pasmo/Suica/etc, which are also increasingly accepted by taxis ...


6

Lacking a chip is not an issue. Almost all card readers are outfitted with both chip and magnetic strip readers. The only time I've seen a card reader without a magnetic stripe reader was in a food truck. Not having a PIN is never an issue when there's a sales clerk around. You'll likely have to tell them that you don't have a PIN number (in Sweden, ...


3

As of september last year, I was able to withdraw cash with both VISA and MasterCard from ATMs in indonesia, both were swipe cards. I didn't pay directly at point of sale using any of my cards since that incurs a fee for both of my cards. However I expect swipe cards to be supported anywhere for the foreseeable future since even in my home country ...


6

I was in Sweden in 2014 with an American credit card, and it was accepted literally every place I used it, both ATMs and shops. (Two different cards.) I don't recall trying an automated ticket dispenser (e.g., bus ticket) which I think would be the most likely to fail.



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