New answers tagged

2

You are stranded without your passport, from the sound of your comments without money too and with an expired visa. This doesn't sound like something that can be answered generically, other than the advice to ask your embassy for help.


1

As well as the restrictions on travelling to the UK alone if you are under 18, where the border guard is probably required to verify that you have parental consent, the automated process requires you to self-certify that you have entered the correct particulars. There is a minimum age below which you will not be considered legally competent to do that, and ...


0

See the information for if you are under 18 traveling to the UK. For example, a person under 18 traveling alone needs written consent to travel to the UK from their parent or guardian. Checking that would be very difficult to automate.


6

I got an urgent-processing passport recently. The rules are here. I don't think there's an official cut-off time, but I showed up as early as I could in the morning just in case, recommend the same to you, since even when I showed up early there was already a line in the urgent category. You need proof of travel (airline printout with reservation number is ...


1

No, you will not. As you are a Mexican citizen, you have the right to enter Mexico and stay there as long as you like, and since your passport is still valid, it's acceptable ID for airlines.


2

I thought if I never had a book I must fill out DS-11. But you had a passport. That is enough. Nowhere does the official renew page make a distinction between book and card. It also says: You can renew your passport even if it has not expired. And the first two steps to Submit a U.S. Passport Application by Mail (from within the United ...


0

Based on the following answer - http://travel.stackexchange.com/a/21936/42483 You can enter any EU/EEA country (which includes the UK for the next 2+ years definitely) without an ID card or passport as long as you can prove your nationality with whatever means. The only difference is whether it takes you less than a minute to walk through immigration or ...


3

I was in exactly the same circumstances and I managed to enter the UK without any issues.


3

You need to go to the Indian High Comission, in Kuala Lumpa. They can issue you with an emregency certificate, which will enable you to get back to India. You will need to have reported this to the police, filled in two forms, and travel to the Embassy between 09:30 and 12:00 Monday to Friday, and be ready to pay an RM76 fee. You can read about it on this ...


0

The official advice is no, you cannot enter New Zealand using an expired New Zealand passport. In the case of NZ and Australian passport holders or NZ residents/Australian permanent residents (with current travel conditions), your passport must be valid for enough time to allow you to travel to New Zealand (ie, it must be valid on the date you are ...


7

If you have just received your boarding pass - this means you have not yet passed through immigration; however you must have shown your passport to the check-in desk agent in order to receive your boarding pass. You need to: First, check your bags. You may have placed it somewhere other than where you would normally look. Try to get to a table where you ...


6

Once you have your new passport, call the airline and ask them to update your passport details. They will likely want you verify your old pp number and/or perhaps the payment card number, so have them handy when you call. Just to be safe, I would carry the old one with you when you fly.


0

All degrees of theft carry some form of jail sentence and a fine; these range from 60 days and $500 all the way to 30 years and $10,000 - it depends entirely on what you are charged with; which correlates directly with the value of the item. So, the very first thing you have to do is find out what exactly is the charge against you; in other words - what ...


3

This depends entirely on what type of visa you are applying for and to which country. The US, for example, regularly issues visas that are beyond the expiry date of the passport. In this case, you have to carry your old expired passport with you, as it contains the visa - along with your current passport as this is valid for travel. Other countries do not ...


3

Your best advice in this situation is to speak to a local lawyer in Florida. The lawyer will be able to inform you of the risks of visiting the state, as well as the options of settling the misdemeanor charge currently set against you. If it's truly a minor misdemeanor, you might be able to send a written affidavit to Florida and have the lawyer argue the ...


6

In addition to the issue of the potential arrest warrant, which has been extensively covered in other answers, there is another issue to consider. The UK is part of the US's Visa Waiver Program. This allows visa-free travel and requires you to complete an online form and declaration, and pay a small fee. It is the usual way for a UK citizen to travel to the ...


2

As others have mentioned here, there's no particular order to stamps/visas, you get them where you get them (but you can certainly try asking for a specific stamp placement). One more thing I wanted to add to the other answers: There's something I've seen in particular with ex-Soviet countries - for some reason many of the border officials like to put the ...


1

The easiest way to address this would be via a birth certificate and the easiest route will likely be Thailand. Thailand extends citizenship to anyone born there. If you were issued a birth certificate in Thailand, then it's quite likely you can approach the Thai Embassy in the US to confirm and issue citizenship documentation/passport. If you weren't ...


4

I was on a student visa (F1) when I got GlobalEntry, and I asked what happens when I move back and use ESTA. The CBP person told me that both ESTA and GlobalEntry are both CBP programs, so they share information CBP will know about my new ESTA, and I don't need to do anything for GlobalEntry. Considering this, I think it's safe to assume they would know ...


8

I am just going to answer the specific question "will they know it's me now that I've got a new passport". That question has got somewhat buried in discussion of the probability of negative consequences if they do know, and ways of mitigating those consequences. The USCIS has the information you supplied on your last visit. You will presumably complete an ...


3

The only person who might be concerned about stamps being in chronological order is the passport holder. Some folks like things neat and orderly, the rest of us could care less. Likewise with Immigration and Consular officials, some are neat and orderly and will stamp your passport on the first available slot or completely empty page (depending on stamp or ...


4

There is no order of any kind in passport stampings, all countries stamp wherever they feel like / whatever is the first page to pop open. If you ask nicely, they'll potentially stamp on the page you want them to, but potentially they also get suspect why you would want that.


4

I am surprised that no one mentioned the fact that you could be in contempt of court and that an arrest warrant could be a sealed arrest warrant (that is, you won't discover there is an outstanding warrant against you until it's too late). An arrest warrant is usually NOT published or posted online. It is kept secret so that the police can arrest you with ...


23

While I agree with all the advice that it's both foolish to risk incarceration in a foreign country for the sake a family vacation (in quite an over-rated spot, at that) and that showing up in court in response to a summons is not considered an optional activity, you can check fairly easily on whether or not you have any active warrants in Florida. The ...


36

Although it doesn't entirley answer your question, I am posting this as answer because I don't think you appreciate the risks involved here. Your proposition is to travel to a foreign country and risk imprisonment there, for the sake of a family holiday. Your hope for avoiding these consequences is that they will not recognise you based off the fact that ...


0

Several countries offer loose-leaf entry Permits (aka e-visas), such as India and Azerbaijan, though you'd still get entry/Exit stamps in the passport


-1

I have travelled through out "Europe" may times on four wheels and two wheels and have never been stopped in-between countries. The so-called borders are closed and all countries have "free" movement through out the EU.


2

All the countries I know with some form of mandatory ID (the Netherlands being the only one I know where carrying ID is mandatory, but there are other where you have to hold an officially sanctioned form of ID and be able to present it within 24 hours or some other short delay) also issue ID cards so that most citizens would have one beside their passports ...


8

What you have is a common format residence permit. It looks very much like a Dutch national ID card (same format and general appearance, but the colours are different) and is actually a valid ID for many purposes within the Netherlands. It even says "Identiteitsbewijs" on the card itself, which is arguably a little confusing. What EU law calls a "national ...


2

You will have no problems . Since I travel a LOT , I need to renew my passport every year almost . I have some long term visas ( Including 10 year visa ) . I just carry the ones I need together . Further Information regarding valid visa in expired passports : Some countries require that you will renew the visa if the passport is changed . Most don't . ( I ...


4

You will need to carry both your old and new passport while traveling and immigration would have no problems with that. I have ten year and five year visas for many countries (including Canada and USA) and they are all on my old passport including an indefinite leave to remain in the UK stamp and I just carry both my passports with me. Source : Own ...


17

The VFS affixed a barcode sticker to the back of your passport; this is so that they can track when your passport is sent to the consulate, received at the consulate, returned to the VFS, and returned to the applicant. Each time the sticker is scanned a computer system is updated with the new status. The sticker is meaningless to the end-user and it is ...


62

Henning Makholm's answer addresses the issue of your possible statelessness, and suggests a way of obtaining a travel document. The other alternative is to acquire a citizenship. Your case is complicated and I would recommend consulting an immigration lawyer. Below is some relevant information, mostly extracted from Wikipedia. Note that it is possible that ...


16

I don't know my nationality. How can I visit Denmark? Simple! talk to USCIS (could be as simple as using Ask a Question link on their website) and ask them that. Since they issued you a green card they will know your exact status in their records. They can best tell if you are a citizen of any country according to their records or not Depending upon ...


11

No. The rules apply to you as an individual person, not to a specific passport. No matter how many passports you have, you, the unique human being, get 90 out of 180 days (otherwise a lot of people would be conveniently losing their passport regularly).


131

From your description it appears that you are stateless -- that is, no country recognizes you as its citizen. That makes international travel difficult, but what's generally supposed to happen is that the country where you're legally resident (that is, the United States) can issue you a passport-like document which can serve as an identification document ...


2

You can certainly apply -- in the sense that the circumstances you have described does not require the Portuguese consulate in London to reject an application from you. The Schengen visa processing handbook gives this example: However, an application may be accepted from a person legally present – but not residing - in the jurisdiction of the ...


7

An Indian passport with ECR stamp will be issued only to those persons who are not educated i.e. they have not formally graduated class 10th (in other words have not passed Matriculation examination). As you are pursuing BE, which clearly implies that you have graduated/passed your 10th grade examination (regardless of CBSE or state board). So you will have ...


5

As you have not yet graduated, you require ENCR if you are traveling for purposes of work to certain countries; as stated plainly on http://boi.gov.in/content/encrecr: As per the Emigration Act, 1983, Emigration Check Required (ECR) categories of Indian passport holders, require to obtain "Emigration Clearance" from the office of Protector of ...


10

Out of curiosity: how likely is it that you end up in a foreign country with your passport inside your checked-in luggage, and are there specific safeguards in place to prevent that? There are no safeguards against you checking in your passport with your luggage; other than the practical sequence of events (as you mentioned) that the passport is ...


3

This works exactly the same as with dual nationality, see the canonical answer: I have two passports/nationalities. How do I use them when I travel?. Treat it as case 1. In this case you entered the USA with your USA visa passport, so you have to use that again when leaving the country (checking in). In China you show your passport with Chinese visa. Keep ...


7

The Schengen Embassies at Doha (Hungarian, Spanish, German, Italian) receptionists/officers answered me for the same query that I can bring my passport later for Visa Sticker Affixing, but it will take three working days apart from Decision Time. If I leave it with them, then they will do it in one go, n no extra days. And no third trip needed, only ...


4

They do it for multiple reasons: Avoid fraud. They keep the passport, to ensure the visa is being issued to the same passport. Often the document verification process takes places at a different location than the document collection process. This may be true if you are submitting your application at a consulate and not at the embassy proper; or you are ...


27

I can answer this for the UK and Schengen members... In the first instance, consulates take your passport because there are some laws involving how a visa is issued. Prominent among those are... Paragraph 24, which states... The following must produce to the Immigration Officer a valid passport or other identity document endorsed with a United ...


-2

From the us government website https://travel.state.gov/content/visas/en/visit/visitor.html Visitor visa -> Gather Required Documentation -> Passport Passport valid for travel to the United States - Your passport must be valid for at least six months beyond your period of stay in the United States, unless exempt by country-specific agreements (PDF - 57 ...


1

APC is pointless in my opinion. I was in transit through Fort Worth airport 2 days ago and had to queue for ages for an APC kiosk (only half were working) then I had to queue for ages again for a rude CPB officer who took my photo and fingerprints again! APC seems pointless.


5

In general, border guards in third countries have no business trying to determine based on your passport if you have complied with the Schengen rules in earlier visits. Passports don't consistently contain enough information for them to do that -- for example, non-EEA nationals with residence permits in a Schengen country will routinely have widely separated ...


1

Whenever you travel without your Schengen passport, you run the risk of being treated as someone who does not possess the right of free movement within the European union (and non-EU Schengen countries). Nobody can predict what trouble might arise. You could be "banned" from the Schengen area if you cannot prove your Schengen nationality, though the ban ...


0

We have travelled to Thailand for the past 8 years with Thai Airways and have always booked our tickets online; at no time have we ever been asked for passport numbers, just showing these at check-in. Never had any problems whatsoever.


4

The UK requires you to have a current and valid passport at the moment you apply for a Tier 2 visa. Current and valid seems to mean that the passport should be valid for the entire duration of your stay, although this kinda conflicts with the whole concept that passports do in fact expire. However, this is nothing to be worried about. As long as the passport ...



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