Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

31

Lets reiterate You had a problem with your current passport People were not accepting (or at least easily) other means of identification It seems you were just let go on that occasion because people had "better things to do". Even if by all laws your current passport (or other documents provided) should work, you already know that this didn't impress ...


24

I know your question is totally based on the Schengen area of Europe, and its controls; however, I read an answer to a different question and it included a synopsis of a FAQ on the U.S. Department of State website, which I will add here as well. Do I need to take a new photo if I recently dyed my hair a new color or grew a beard? New photos are only ...


18

It is an ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) standard, and as you know ICAO is the organization that standardize all international travel documents. From the document ICAO 9303 (Machine readable Travel Documents) which regulates all kinds of travel documents worldwide including passports: 11/II Sex of the holder, to be specified by use of ...


18

It's not the happiest of reasons, but quite a few countries care not just what your country of citizenship is, but where you or your family is originally from. For example, India imposes additional restrictions on anybody of Pakistani origin, anybody born in the ex-USSR must prove they have renounced their citizenship if applying for a Russian visa, people ...


18

An immediate reason is that some international norms recommend it but they do not mandate it (the ICAO coordinates this at an international level, see comments for more detail). EU passports must also mention it. A more general reason for ID of any kind to have a date of birth and place of birth is to be able to distinguish people with the same name ...


18

Although not common, some countries issue passports to non-citizens as well. As you may have noticed, the data page of a passport often states the nationality or citizenship of the holder in a separate field and the citizenship may actually differ from the issuing country. One example is laissez-passer documents or emergency passports, which may be issued ...


11

No matter how ‘gender-neutral’ our culture tends to be, many women have big issues with stripping in front of or being touched by unknown men. To a lesser extent, some men have similar issues. It is an issue in WC or changing rooms, but when it comes to travelling, there are issue with personal control. If there is be a need for personal control, then men ...


9

The general rule is that you should always use the country's passport when entering the country. As the other answers note, many countries (eg. the US) also have legislation requiring citizens to use their passport to enter/leave, although obviously this is hard to enforce. Obviously there are cases where you can get away with this in practice, eg. your ...


9

People do change in time, this is a fact an no one can do anything about it unless you really stick to a strict life style. Considering that, you have two options: An expensive quick solution: Renew your passport, even if it is not expired. I am sure I have seen passport renewal forms with a checkbox saying "due to change in looks" or something like that. ...


7

I think just the fact that it's one of the few attributes of a person that is generally verifiable (through birth records), and will never change, makes it useful to include on a passport or other document of identity. You can change your country of citizenship, your name, and even your sex, but the circumstances of your birth will never change.


6

You are probably running into several acts and regulations here, both of the issuing and the visiting country, each with vague and legalese description of what to do and what not to do. The most relevant legal text is in this particular case probably the Norwegian alien regulation (Utlendingsforskriften), which in § 4-12 states that when entering or leaving ...


6

From the ESTA website (which I was reading just as you posted the question!): Your "Country of Issue" is the same as your "Country of Citizenship". For instance, if you are a citizen of the United Kingdom, but are getting your passport from the UK Consulate in Hong Kong, the UK is your country of issue. The UK Consulate may be located in Hong Kong, ...


5

You could dry the pages with paper towels as much as possible, then hang it to dry on a string with the pages spread out or separated by bits of paper towel- don't leave them in contact with each other wet or they may stick together. Change the paper towels for dry ones periodically as it dries. You could also put it in a container with some silica gel, but ...


5

First, you usually need a passport or national ID to get on the plane (using web check-in you might get around that, depending on airport, airline and boarding procedure details). Furthermore, Even if you don't need a passport for border checks within the Schengen area, it is still always highly recommended to take a passport or ID card with you, so you ...


5

The Embassy of Sweden in Pristina has some information regarding travelling to and from Kosovo on its homepage. It is could certainly be applied to travellers with other nationalities as well. In- och utresebestämmelser EU-medborgare är sedan 8 maj 2013 tillåtna att vid in- och utresa i Kosovo presentera en giltig identitetshandling i form av ...


5

I think the opposite is also known to happen (i.e. people getting through with another person's passport based on a vague similarity). Photos just aren't very reliable. It's difficult to judge without seeing your picture but I would therefore expect that with full documentation (especially a UK residence permit, even without biometrics!) most border guards ...


5

It's difficult to know precisely without context but there are few cases where this could be relevant, in particular: Travel documents other than passports (e.g. refugee travel documents) are issued by the country where the person resides and indicate that the holder can be readmitted to the country of issue even though they are still citizens of another ...


4

Get your passport renewed as soon as possible. It's a cheap option compared with being denied boarding of a flight or entry to a country. Since it expires in less than a year, you were probably going to want to renew soon anyway, as some countries need 6 months of validity. In the meantime I would recommend carrying several pieces of photo ID with you, ...


4

When you go to pick up your new passport, ask to keep the old one. They will void it by clipping a corner or punching a hole through it, but that is sufficient to establish the connection between the passport number on the ticket and your identity.


4

There is no requirement to consistently enter a country with the same (nationality) passport for your entire lifetime. You can enter the USA as an Italian citizen (subject to the normal procedures such as ESTA), without reference to your Argentinian citizenship at all.


4

A substitute for silica is rice - that is more easily available. Submerge your passport in rice with all the pages separated.


4

I am not 100% sure if I understand you correctly, so let me recapture: You have a valid U.S. visa, but the surname and given name appear are transposed Your visa is in your old passport In your new passport, the surname and given name are combined into your given name, and the surname remains blank If this is the case, you should (please thoroughly read ...


3

If the passport number, and the passport number listed on the visa, do not match then this mismatch could cause serious difficulties during travel. For example, a border control officer could conclude that she was somehow trying to use somebody else's visa to enter the country. She should contact the US agency which issued her visa, tell them about the ...


3

One very fast and reliable way it to simply leave your open passport next to a fan - put a fan onto a table and put the passport onto some raised object in front of the fan. Once the pages closest to the fan dry out (which is like in half an hour) you can proceed to other pages. Alternatively you can interleave the pages with something like pens or similar ...


3

Each country is basically free to set their own rules. Generally speaking, presenting the local passport when you are a citizen is the most practical course of action but it's not like it would be some sort of overarching principle that applies to all countries in the world. In all likelihood, Denmark does not care either way. The US, on the other hand, ...


3

Rules in the US are usually the same for layover/transit and for entering the country so I don't think the fact that you would be transiting exempts you from any passport validity requirement. In your case, however, it seems Hong Kong is on the list of countries whose citizens can enter the US even if their passport expires less than six months after their ...


2

On the Indian Passport we have three things i.e. Nationality Place of Issue Place of Birth Not sure if this is common in other countries though, but we don't do country of issue, we do place of issue. So an Indian Passport page would look like this, Here, as you may note, there is a place of issue as well as a place of birth which are very specific ...


2

Agreements tend to be reciprocal (although I would not be surprised if some weren't) but many countries also simply decide unilaterally to grant visa-free entry to citizens of other countries. You don't need an agreement for that. For example, compare the visa policy of Haiti (certainly a very open country, on paper) and requirements for Haitian citizens. ...


2

Children do need some documentation in any case. In the past, children could also be included in their parents' passports but I think this is being phased out. In fact, the requirements are often even more stringent for a child than for an adult because if the child does not appear to be yours (distinct surname), merely having a passport or ID card might ...


2

For the UK, you don't need to apply for a new visa if your passport expires. You can either travel with both your old passport (with the visa in it) and your new passport or pay a fee to transfer the visa to the new passport. But that's only true if the visa itself is still valid. On the other hand, if the visa has an expiration date, then it's almost ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible