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16

As with all police matters, it is probably best to go to the police station that covers the smallest area that you are within. If you lost your papers in a train station (large enough to have its own transit police), go to the transit police. If you lost your papers in a city, go to the city police. If you lost your papers outside a city, go to the state ...


14

ARE is indeed the ISO 3166-1 alpha-3 country code for United Arab Emirates. These are the codes used for machine readable passports as defined by ICAO. Looking at the wikipedia page showing the format used for machine readable passports you can see that the ISO 3166-1 codes are used both to identify the issuing country as well as the nationality of the ...


13

Unfortunately, you'll need a (real, physical) passport to enter Poland, no ifs or buts You can request an expedited passport by mail for an extra fee, or there are 28 passport centers across the USA where you can get same day processing for an even bigger fee. Since you've already mailed in an application, you may want to call them on the phone ...


11

The United States has a very complicated law enforcement system, it's often difficult to tell the difference between police and private security. For example, New York City transit police are real police. The ones minding the trains in many smaller cities are not, yet they have uniforms, radios, guns etc. However, any law enforcement officer will know who ...


8

Most countries prohibit "defacing" passports, and most countries will refuse entry if the passport is "damaged". Obviously there's a wide grey area between an accidental scribble and an unacceptably defaced/damaged passport, and it's largely up to the immigration officer to decide where to draw the line (ba-dum tssh). The usual red lines (har!) are: ...


7

It depends a bit on where you are, as there are a number of policing units from state police to country sheriffs to city police to university police to transit police. But ultimately, they can all file a report on the lost documents for you to present to your embassy. On a general basis, if you don't know exactly where you lost them, then you would go to ...


7

Given your choice of tags I believe this is relevant: there is no formal requirement in United Kingdom law for British Citizens to carry a passport to enter the United Kingdom and that despite being from six years ago is still the law. However note the risk of delay. If you don't need a passport (or travel document equivalent for such purpose) you ...


6

If you want to enter the UK as a British citizen and you have an expired UK passport, your case is covered by Paragraph 12 of the Immigration Rules... A person claiming to be a British citizen must prove that he has the right of abode in the United Kingdom by producing either: (i) a United Kingdom passport describing him as a British citizen or as ...


5

The US Department of State website says: If you are traveling within 2 weeks or need a passport for a foreign visa within 4 weeks and: Have already applied, please contact our National Passport Information Center (1-877-487-2778) to speak with a Customer Service Representative when you are 7 days out from your travel date. So if you're within ...


5

I don't have any evidence for it but I suspect it might be necessary to satisfy APIS requirements. If you can provide a nickname, you could conceivably evade automatic checks against no-fly lists and similar databases. Also, many people (e.g. from places like Indonesia) go by names that are completely different from what's on their passport. As @pnuts ...


4

US law says you must leave and enter the US with your US passport, but the US border officers do not actually look at the documents of people who are leaving, so they do not actually enforce that part of the rule. As for returning, as others have noted, you can get into the country with your naturalization certificate, though you may have to do more ...


4

people said I cannot go back the US without US passport, This is not correct. On one hand you must have a passport but there's no penalty for breaking this rule and more importantly, US citizens can't be denied entry into the USA if adequate proof is provided they are indeed citizens. There is no hard and fast rule here but the USCIS itself says ...


4

By law, U.S. citizens are supposed to enter and leave the U.S. with a valid U.S. passport, with some exceptions. The exceptions include if you have an "enhanced driver's license" (very few states offer these) or trusted traveler program cards (e.g. NEXUS), etc., or if you are a child under 16 you can use just your birth certificate. As a U.S. citizen, you ...


3

The longest part of going through passport control, especially in a busy airport like ATL, is queuing. So eyeball the queue and how fast it's moving. APC requires you to spend a minute or so at a machine which will print a piece of paper, then show that piece of paper to an officer, so you'll queue twice; but the queues may well be significantly shorter. ...


3

First, the use of the APC kiosk does not mean you will not see the CBP officer, you will still have to see an officer at a booth, it just saves the time by making the job easier for you and for the officer, basically by making you help the officer in doing some of the job (scanning the passport, taking the photograph, etc.). Hence, the above made the ...


3

From CBP Can a Visa Waiver Program traveler with more than one passport travel to the United States on the passport that he or she did not use when applying for a travel authorization? No. Each Visa Waiver Program traveler must have an approved travel authorization for the passport they plan to use before they travel to the United States. If a ...


3

It depends - the visa, not so much, but when your US passport expires. Yes, a visa is valid until the visa expiry date. So in your case, you can arrive in India on August 19, and leave again the same day if you want - your visa is still valid. So travelling there between May and June is fine as well, as it's still valid. However, you'll need to travel with ...


2

"ARE" is the ISO 3166-1 alpha-3 country code and the NATO 3 letter code for the UAE. This means that yes, "ARE" is the country code in UAE passports.


2

You can apply to replace a lost I-94 by filing I-102. It's very expensive though. It might be worth checking the I-94 website in case they have it there, in which case you can print it out; though it's unlikely in your case. How are you leaving the U.S.? According to this page, if you leave by air, you don't have to turn in an I-94. But if you leave by ...


1

There will be absolutely no issue, as none of the transit countries have airside transit visa requirements; so you are never actually "entering the country". In other words - as long as your passport allows you entry into your destination country (either by your citizenship or because it has a visa stamped) you will be issued a boarding pass on the start of ...


1

If no other rules (like you are a citizen) apply, then you can choose whichever passport is more convenient for you. If you have one Schengen and one non-Schengen passport it would make little sense to use the non-Schengen passport in Europe, unless you really like lines and forms.


1

According to a post on the Lonely Planet forums last year: ... AZerbaidjan full page, Armenia full page, Iraqui Kurdistan stamp (so two stamps almost a page), Turkey two small stamps (may be half a page), Georgia same (two small stamps, entry and exit another half page). I dont expecvt these practices changed though cannot verify. ... sounds ...


1

In Germany you can keep it but the clerks will use hole puncher to invalidate it. But maybe you "lose" your passport, get a new one and then suddenly retrieve the old one :)


1

I know in some Minnesota bars passports don't work, but it's really up to the company behind the bar not the bar itself.



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