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1

This may sound a bit harsh, but if people need darkness to sleep when traveling, it is up to them to ensure that. Eyemasks are the common technique. If I'm at a window then I will have it open or shut as I want. That's why I have the window. If I'm at the aisle I'm there so I can gain the benefits an aisle seat gives me. And of course cabin crew ...


1

Buy or otherwise obtain an inexpensive sleeping mask, still in its packaging. Then, you can have the following conversation: "Would you mind putting down the window shade?" "Actually, I would. I suffer from terribly from claustrophobia and I get nauseated and start vomiting if the shade is down." "Oh, but I'm trying to sleep." "Huh. I know, here use ...


7

Much like the passenger who wants to recline their seat, the right belongs to the person with the controls - in this case the window seat person. - however, that person should still be a considerate human being. If you want a look outside, that's fine. However if passengers next to you are trying to sleep - on an overnight flight where you experience a ...


3

This is a bit more work, but once onboard (or you've flown the airline's plane type before), identify a seat where the window is set back closer to your seat, or is slightly behind the seat in front of you. That is, you're trying to identify one where it will be partially blocked and won't interfere with your seat mates as much. If you're not in that row, ...


1

If you go to some air focused boards, you will be told basically, if you have the window seat, the shade is yours to control and no one really can make you close it. However, please be aware that the bright light is a nuisance to many passengers who are trying to sleep, watch a video or who are in a direct line from the window. If claustrophobia is the ...



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