Hot answers tagged

33

Your ONLY path here is to ask the company you travelled with. They'll be the only one with his details, IF you booked under your names for the trip. Even then, they likely won't give you his name for privacy reasons. However, if you impress upon them the gravity of the situation, they might be prepared to contact him on your behalf and see if he's ...


29

Did you get some sort of receipt? Do you know exactly which kind of "security" official confiscated your item? If not, you'll have a very hard time proving anything even happened, although you can try your luck with the airport's complaints line at +86-10-96158. In any case, the airline is not responsible. Security rules are laid out by the Civil ...


27

A flight changed to the next day is essentially the same as a long delay/cancellation as far as EU air passenger rights are concerned. But if you have been informed more than two weeks before departure, you only have a choice between going through with the alternative flights they are offering and cancelling your booking (in which case you would get your ...


22

In most juristictions that operate with something approaching sanity, someone is liable for accidental damage in the following three cases: They caused the damage deliberately or with "blameworthy carelessness". They have entered into a contract where they explicitly accept to be responsible for the risk. The law contains an explicit exception for the ...


20

The issue is that in order to give you a specific seat, they need it to be free. If the better seats are already given away, normally the people who have received a seat have this printed on their (e-) tickets. Moving someone away from their seat because you want it is very tricky. So the best strategy would be to get a better seat in the first place ...


19

If the airline can make any claim of weather, traffic, or any sort of delay out of their control, then you have no right to recompense. Sometimes they will offer hotel vouchers for overnight delays, but in my experience this is almost exclusively when it is due to mechanical problems with their equipment. Even if the delays are due to problems on their end,...


18

The BBC actually has an article related to this entitled "Who, What, Why: Is it legal to restrain air passengers?". It explains: A number of conventions - including the Tokyo Convention (1963) and the Montreal Convention (1971) - address the issue of ensuring safety and discipline on board a plane. The Tokyo Convention emphasises that the ...


16

Laws are a regional thing, and while many flights are international, whether or not the crew's actions are legal will depend heavily on which country the court proceedings take place in. My expertise is only in United States law and the FAA regulations, but similar regulations exist abroad as well. Here are some key points: 1: The airline (and in particular,...


15

Oh yes, you have a right to compensation. EU law EC 261/2004 requires not only either the full ticket price or another fly to the same destination, but costs for lodging and a compensation of 200 - 600 € depending on the length of the flight (200 for < 1500 km, 400 for < 3000 km else 600). The first thing you need to know: As from now you need to get ...


14

For most weather related cancellations or delays (technical term is WX), as Beofett noted, the airline typically owes you nothing more than eventually getting you there (sometimes even by bus, although difficult to do in over-water flights :D), or refunding you your money. For mechanical delays or cancellations (MX), the airline has a much higher obligation ...


13

Contact the coach company: the man you lent the book to might have handed it in as lost property at the end of his journey. It's unlikely that they'll be willing to give you his details because that would be a violation of his privacy. Would they even know who he was? Do they have your details, for example? Would you have any way of telling them which of the ...


13

To be honest and as a cabin crew member, I have never heard of such a thing. The second advantage of being a flight attendant is meeting different people from different countries and cultures (after going to many places). So having a racist flight attendant is like having a doctor that does not like to touch people! or a nurse that can not see blood. So if ...


11

I do not think there is a rule written somewhere that gives the cabin crew the right to restrain a passenger, and I do not think there is a training for that to cabin crew (how to restrain a passenger). The rules vary from an airlines to another, from one civil aviation authority to another, but the guide lines will always be the three steps way of dealing ...


10

Your ability to be compensated depends a bit on the situation, in particular were there other passengers 'abandoned' or was it just you and your wife? If there were multiple persons left behind due to incompetence or a lack of communication, then you have a chance. But if it was just the two of you, Iberia will be able to claim that others reboarded and ...


9

The rules will apply to the operating carrier. ie, the one that is actually flying the flight - not the one that you booked with. EU Compensation applies to EU airlines regardless of where the flight is to/from, AND to non-EU airlines for flights DEPARTING an EU member state. eg, a Lufthansa flight between the US and Frankfurt would be covered in either ...


9

Almost always, I find the best approach is "gradual improvement". Almost all the seating changes you need to make can be made most effectively through the airline's own website: Firstly, always check if you can pick your seat as soon as your ticket is booked. Most full-price airlines, typically if you have some frequent-flyer status or a higher-priced ...


8

Go to the same coach, on the same day of the week, at the same time. There's a very good chance he uses it to commute. You'll probably see him again.


8

I'd say it's fairly straightforward, you deal with them on a plane just like any racist individual you meet on the ground. You have several options: Explain to them that you feel they're being offensive in their words/behaviour. They may not realise that certain words are bad, and that may solve the problem on the spot. Ask another flight attendant if you ...


7

A good starting point is maybe EPIC (Electronic Privacy Information Center). They filed a lawsuit against the usage of body scanners. And they have a ton of other useful information. In this news report it is also mentioned that EPIC is very active in this field. Another interesting group is maybe Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF). On their website, they ...


7

Given that it's a European flight, EU regulation 261/2004 is relevant, and covers your options. In addition to the full regulations (linked above), there's a summary on Wikipedia which covers your situation. In short, as the flight is more than 2 weeks away you are not due any compensation, however Atricle 8 of EU 261/2004 does explicitly call out what ...


7

Try putting a personal ad in local newspapers that are sold in the towns of origin and destination for your journey. Maybe you could include TinyURL links (or equivalent) to your Facebook and LinkedIn pages. It's a long shot, but it may be worth trying if the paper is important enough.


7

Much like the passenger who wants to recline their seat, the right belongs to the person with the controls - in this case the window seat person. - however, that person should still be a considerate human being. If you want a look outside, that's fine. However if passengers next to you are trying to sleep - on an overnight flight where you experience a ...


6

In India Government store the name and other detail only if coach is reserved and not for general people. If you paid for a reserve seat a call to Rail department will certainly help you. If it was general coach then you need to take help of Newspaper by publish the ads.


6

You should be able to find the conditions on the airline website. Most of the conditions might be different from an airline to an other but you also have rights which are not airline-dependant. The one you might be interested in is EU261. Terms and conditions for RyanAir, for instance : 9.2.2 If your flight is cancelled or delayed for at least two ...


5

I'm curious myself and did a Google search. I could only find some new news from PBS. They covered the new Passenger Bill of Rights (effective August 2011): Excerpt: Notification of Flight Changes: Airlines are now required to inform passengers of delays and bumps either at the gate, via cell phone, or online for domestic flights. This gives passengers ...


4

I experienced similar things happening to me while I was traveling in China. In both of my cases, the security guard and hotel manager both asked for cash to make some unpleasant circumstances, which they had created, go away. While you're looking for a bureaucratic solution, a bribe might have done the trick. From the comments, "on the spot fine" seems ...


4

As expected, the website of Air China is yielding results. They pretty much make it clear that they will either get you to your destination within "reasonable time" or refund your ticket: 9.2.2 [...] if we cancel a flight, [...] we shall, at your option, either: 9.2.2.1 carry you at the earliest opportunity on another of our scheduled services on ...


4

They are required to check power banks and lithium batteries for the labels and to not allow ones that fall outside of the guidelines. This is a safety issue. I fully support taking dodgy unmarked batteries or power banks off of travelers (and out of checked luggage) and disposing of them as hazardous waste. Every flight I have taken recently in China they ...


3

Although I highly doubt how them airline fellows are managing such a thing, but a quick google shows that such a pass does exist : http://www.airindia.com/SBCMS/Webpages/AI-Introduces-Attractive-Ten.aspx



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