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21

As a matter of fact, they just have been reopened. The Musée Carnavalet, the museum in charge of the catacombs, announced on their Facebook page one hour ago: Bonne nouvelle ! Les Catacombes sont de nouveau ouvertes au public. Nous vous souhaitons un agréable après-midi Which translates to: "Good news! The catacombs are now again open to the ...


13

Basically, in France, smoking is forbidden indoors except in private places and allowed outdoors. The law changed considerably around 2007–2008, so if you last came to France over 10 years ago, the situation then has nothing to do with the situation now. Smoking is forbidden in covered spaces in government and other public buildings, in public transport ...


12

It depends what you are talking about. The "Ossuaire Municipal" where bones from thousands of people are stored just reopened according to their Facebook page. The official site is still saying it is closed but official stuff in France tend to be a tad slow. Parisian people also use the word Catacombes for the whole network of former quarries and other ...


10

What I can tell you about northern Italy (anywhere between Milano and Venice) is that the cities basically closes down in August (except for tourist destinations such as museums and churches), and even more so in the afternoon. If you will be walking the streets of any town in that area (Modena, Padua, Ravenna, Verona, etc), it will be like in a Zombie movie ...


7

Cheapest: walk everywhere. Paris isn't a very nice place for biking (though it's improving, but slowly), but you can do it. There's a public short-term bike rental service called Vélib: you take a bike from one of the ubiquitous stands (only within the Paris city limits and in a short range outside, not in the whole suburbs) and bring it to another stand ...


7

My first hand experience with France is that on 1st of August it's absolutely impossible to get through, because of absolutely infernal traffic on all the highways. Seems like everyone is going to the beach at same time. I haven't visited cities at that time, so can't say how bad is it. I do have first hand experience living in Madrid, which does indeed ...


7

There are two main stations in Versaille, Versailles - Château - Rive-Gauche on the RER C, and Versailles - Rive Droite on regular suburban network. The Château stop is about a 5 minute walk to the entrance, which the Rive Droite one is closer to 10. There is also Versailles - Chantiers on the RER C and local lines, but that's the furthest. I'd suggest you ...


6

As an Indian national with a US Visa transiting a French airport you do not generally require a visa, as you can TWOV (Transit Without Visa). Presuming you are passing through Paris CDG airport, then this is true even if you have to change terminals as there is an air-side bus. (At Paris ORY airport some transfers can not be made airside and will require a ...


6

Most hotels listed in booking.com are of this type. You can book a hotel and later cancel the booking without any fee or charges. The site is very reliable. For your particular case, you may book this hotel.


5

Definitively yes, e.g., on FNAC Tickets site. Type for instance Louvre in the search box, and you get the link to book a ticket for the Louvre Museum. Alternatively, once in Paris, you can go to any FNAC store and buy a ticket for the Louvre, without the long queue in front of the museum.


5

Generally speaking, http://bahn.de/ is very good to find train connections, even if you are not traveling through Germany and/or cannot book that particular route through the site. Usually, you could therefore check in advance if the train runs on the days you are interested in but it won't help in this case. The problem is not Thello's 120-day booking ...


4

Usually it is possible to get cheap fares for the train from Germany to neighbouring countries via the Sparpreis finder. If I'm not mistaken, it should be possible to get a ticket starting from €49. The cheap tickets tend to run out quite early, so you'll have to book them as soon as possible. The earliest date you can book them is usually 3 months before ...


4

I think it's a bug. After doing a bit of experimenting and digging around, it seems that the price of a complément de parcours varies depending on whether you buy it from RATP or SNCF. (RATP runs the metro, buses, trams except T4, most of RER A and RER B south of Paris; SNCF runs all other suburban trains.) SNCF charges the expected price, while RATP charges ...


4

I've already accepted an answer, but having recently come back from the trip that inspired this question, I thought I'd share my experiences. Paris seemed very empty. Even in the morning on weekdays, there were very, very few people in the streets (excluding the area immediately surrounding popular tourist spots). There were also shops and restaurants ...


4

It depends where you are going to live in Paris. In terms of public transport I would say the most expensive form would be the taxi. The metro/bus/tram would cover all your transportation needs within the city boundaries. You could go for a monthly subscription or buy de "carnet de 10" tickets. These sets of 10 tickets you can buy at any vending machine. As ...


4

The ticket office at major stations such as the airport will be open even on a holiday. In addition, there are ticket machines that accept credit cards (all of them, since this is an RATP station — on the other hand, SNCF stations such as in Roissy airport have machines that only accept credit cards with chips), and I think the ones in the airport also take ...


4

Your best bet using Paris transportation system : Reach the station located in terminal 2. Buy your ticket to Paris at the green machine if you have coins or a chip-and-pin credit card. Else you have to queue at the "regional" ticket booth, not the "grandes lignes" which is for long distance high-speed trains. A ticket to Paris is good for any destination ...


4

Given that you didn't mention a method of transport... The easiest way to get from CDG to Gare Montparnasse without having to transfer is to catch the Air France Coach ("Les Cars AirFrance"), specifically coach number 4. Unlike attempting to catch the the train, these buses will pickup at all terminals at CDG (so there is no need to catch the airport ...


3

I found a flyer on the RATP website that says it only stops at Opera within Paris. From The Place de l'Etoile, you have two options: taking the line 2 of the Cars Air France. It is operated by a private company and goes directly yo Roissy. It is more expensive than the public transit system. connecting to the Roissybus or the RER B to go to the airport. ...


3

The main options would seem to be: Driving If you just travel on your own, petrol alone is a significant expense and you will want to avoid most of the French motorway network to save on tolls but it's perfectly doable in a day. That's assuming you have a car, obviously, if you need to procure one (buy/rent/import), you can forget about this solution. ...


3

To go to Versailles-Château-Rive-Gauche from the center, you only need zones 1-4. A Navigo semaine for zones 1-4 is 32 € or 11.60 € more than a zones 1-2 pass. According to the map on Wikipedia, the last station in zone 2 on RER C trains to Versailles is Issy-Val-de-Seine. A “origine-destination” ticket from this station to the Château costs 1.80 € and this ...


3

So booking in advance definitely seems to have benefits.. An example below for Paris pass Paris Pass Discover the joy of sightseeing with the Paris Pass, which gives you free entry to the best attractions Paris has to offer. Save time as you skip the queues with fast track entry at many attractions, including the Louvre and Muse d'Orsay, and take ...


3

If you look for cheaper and not quicker, there is also Megabus which offer prices starting for 15€. You can compare price for that line here: www.comparabus.com/en/bus-Bruxelles-Paris-3-10


3

I had the same experience at the Sacré Coeur in Montmartre (multiple times). I am a guy but I am blonde, milky white and slim, so I must look like an easy touristy target. As soon as I entered the little park at the bottom of the steps I encountered the first "string man". I instinctively knew it was a scam, so I clenched my hand as soon as they asked for ...


3

For Paris-Milano you have the option of using Thello, which is a proper night train. The trains are really Paris-Venezia, but they stop in Milano. For these, you don't really book first or second class, but you book your compartment type. You can choose between two types of compartments - Couchette or Cabin. Couchette compartments are pretty basic; ...


3

RATP trip planner gives 53mn at 10 o'clock, november 28th, 2013. The route is: On foot walk to Gare du Nord – RER from Gare du Nord RER Ligne B direction Saint-Remy-les-Chevreuse up to Chatelet-Les Halles On foot connection from Chatelet-Les Halles RER Ligne A direction ...


3


3

Take the Air France bus (line 2) to Porte Malliot. It takes about 50 mins and cost 14 euros. Enter the building across the road to reach the Porte Malliot metro station underground. Take Line 1 in the direction of Chateau de Vinecennes. Get down at Concorde. Come out of the metro and wait at the bus stop with yellow hop-on hop-off boards.


3

The RER B line does not go directly to Gare Montparnasse. You would have to transfer to the metro at Les Halles or Denfert Rochereau (or possibly a couple of other places, see the metro map). You could transfer to metro line 4 as early as Gare du Nord, but the RER is much faster than the metro when going through the city.


3

As you are travelling on the same airline, and travelling from a non-Schengen country to another non-Schengen country you will NOT need to pass through immigration in Paris. You bags should be checked all the way through to Edinburgh from Winnipeg. If for some reason they claim they are not able to check them all the way through to Edinburgh I would ...



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