Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

33

Lets reiterate You had a problem with your current passport People were not accepting (or at least easily) other means of identification It seems you were just let go on that occasion because people had "better things to do". Even if by all laws your current passport (or other documents provided) should work, you already know that this didn't impress ...


31

Many of the major airlines do have self-service checkin machines at the airport. I know KLM, allows printing forgotten or failed prints. If your airlines does not have these self service machines, and you are not yet at the airport, try going to a print or copyshop. Most airports these days have these shops, but sometimes they can have quite some waiting ...


27

There is no nationally, or even locally mandated standard. I've certainly seen friends have no issues using both Passports and Drivers Licenses from their home country. I've also seen people have issues - especially when their ID is written in a non-latin script, or when they have a DOB which can be misread by using a non-American date ordering scheme, (i.e. ...


26

An acronym for 'Secondary Security Screening Selection' or 'Secondary Security Screening Selectee' which is an airport security measure in the United States and Canada which selects passengers for additional inspection Though there is no published criteria how passengers are selected for SSSS, Wiki page lists few probable ones.


24

I can give an answer to this because this happens to me very regularly, for a good reason. Typically for holders of US / UK / European / Australian / NZ passports, a wide range of countries do not require a visa in advance, or often issue them on arrival. If you're travelling within North America or Europe where these visa rules are well-known, an airline ...


23

I know your question is totally based on the Schengen area of Europe, and its controls; however, I read an answer to a different question and it included a synopsis of a FAQ on the U.S. Department of State website, which I will add here as well. Do I need to take a new photo if I recently dyed my hair a new color or grew a beard? New photos are only ...


20

Short answer: Yes, according to the official rules you could be denied access at the border. You can avoid this by submitting the green form (along with additional documentation) after the fact. It sounds like you participated in the Visa Waiver Program and the green form was an I-94W. According to the US Government, If you departed by land, private ...


20

An immediate reason is that some international norms recommend it but they do not mandate it (the ICAO coordinates this at an international level, see comments for more detail). EU passports must also mention it. A more general reason for ID of any kind to have a date of birth and place of birth is to be able to distinguish people with the same name ...


19

Annex II of the Schengen Visa Code (EU regulation 810/2009) includes a non-exhaustive list of “supporting documents” that sheds some light on the categories. Here are the most relevant bits: for business trips: (a) an invitation from a firm or an authority to attend meetings, conferences or events connected with trade, industry or work; […] ...


18

For contingent purposes, I always carry the following, in no particular order: Printed copies of my passport and visas (also electronically on my mobile and laptop) Printed and electronic copy of my travel itinerary (I use TripIt on my mobile, and it's always there anyway). Printed copy of my accommodation confirmation (if available) Visa-supporting ...


18

The following is US specific, but I think this is followed the world over. If you ever got to apply for a US visa and in case you don't have a first name or a last name, the US consulate will consider your entire name as your last name and mention FNU (First Name unavailable) in the first name field. It should not cause any problem as it seems to be a ...


18

Although not common, some countries issue passports to non-citizens as well. As you may have noticed, the data page of a passport often states the nationality or citizenship of the holder in a separate field and the citizenship may actually differ from the issuing country. One example is laissez-passer documents or emergency passports, which may be issued ...


18

It's not the happiest of reasons, but quite a few countries care not just what your country of citizenship is, but where you or your family is originally from. For example, India imposes additional restrictions on anybody of Pakistani origin, anybody born in the ex-USSR must prove they have renounced their citizenship if applying for a Russian visa, people ...


17

Generally bars have always asked me for my passport in the US. It's frustrating as you'd rather not take your passport out to town, but when I've tried to take my driver's license as ID, I've either been turned away, or had to really ask nicely and still get told to bring my passport next time. In New Zealand, they're as strict - you either show a NZ ...


17

Short answer is none, you'll be able to apply for visas and enter anywhere, although it may require some explaining. Here's the US Consulate in Chennai (which presumably deals with this all the time) as an example, and a random sample visa from an Indonesian lady: Single names are quite common in eg. southern India, Indonesia and Mongolia, and thus ...


17

Milan and Vienna are both inside the Schengen area, so there will be no routine travel document checks when the train crosses the Itailan-Austrian border. (I'm assuming the passport/ID is all you have forgotten; if you have also forgotten your train ticket, you'll be in trouble, of course). In principle you're supposed to have documentation with you when ...


16

I have had SSSS once. I extended my stay - I was supposed to fly home let's say Thursday night, but Thursday morning I changed my tickets so I would fly home Friday night. When I checked in I was specifically told by the checkin agent that the change was the reason for the SSSS - I was taking a flight I had booked the previous day. She, and everyone else ...


16

If you are a US citizen, you can indeed cross into Canada using your birth certificate and a photo ID. For safety reasons, you may want to bring the original birth certificate, or at least a certified copy. If you are not a US (or Canadian) citizen or permanent resident, you cannot enter Canada without passport: If you are a citizen of the United States, ...


16

Airlines crew sometimes need to travel from one airport to another as passengers but at the same time they are on duty (in airlines terminology we call that Deadheading). In this case the airlines need to move crew from one airport to another due to operational reasons (like bringing new aircraft or bringing an aircraft after being grounded for technical ...


16

As with all police matters, it is probably best to go to the police station that covers the smallest area that you are within. If you lost your papers in a train station (large enough to have its own transit police), go to the transit police. If you lost your papers in a city, go to the city police. If you lost your papers outside a city, go to the state ...


14

I fly Air Canada as my primary airline. It is worth checking in online even if you don't have a printer available. There are no negative consequences compared to not checking in at all. You can line up to see someone and hand off your baggage, and they'll "reprint" your boarding pass, or you can use the kiosks (I have never seen a lineup for AC kiosks, ...


13

After some inspection and asking few crew members. It turns out that if you enter any country within the Schengen area as a crew member then you can move within the Schengen area. Make sure you have your passport and a copy of the crew members General Declaration. UPDATE: I went to Amsterdam and came back, I asked the police at the station in Paris and he ...


13

While I've never seen this on a customs form, or been asked this at customs, it used to be super popular at checkin. I never lie, so this would happen: Did you pack your bags yourself? Yes. And then Have the bags been out of your sight or control since you packed them? Yes, I left them at the hotel bag drop all day, or the conference bag drop all ...


13

All of the reasons except Business and Study are clearly and obviously not applicable to your case. Let's ignore them. Is your main reason for attending to present, or to attend? If you're there to present, saying "study" is deceptive - you aren't there to learn anything. If you were already graduated, and employed (in academia or in private industry) I ...


13

About 95% of the questions on this site are about the UK or Schengen members, so let's take those first. The first exhibit is a Schengen refusal form... ...we can see that the term is unambiguously 'refusal'. This is a standard form used by the 20+ Schengen members. The next exhibit is a (redacted) UK notice... ...again we see the term is ...


12

Technically speaking, almost all airlines can serve you well without any tickets or PNRs (passenger number record or booking reference) as long as you have bought the ticket and made reservation regardless of the method of buying. All they need is your name and a valid ID (passport in international flights) and they can get you the boarding pass. Even the ...


12

There's a question about this on Skeptics-SE: The accepted answer gave two examples of people being deported for lying on their forms, including one who didn't mention her history with the SS when she applied for a visa in 1959, and the DoJ caught up with her in 2004 and deported her.


12

So I am reading a blog on a TSA site, which describes though not in great detail the standard operating procedure for the inspection of the bags including an automated system that triggers the bag inspection. So if the inspection is warranted a human being will pull your bag and do a manual inspection and finds the notice inside the bag. Now here is where ...


11

For travel in many South American and African countries you will also need an international Certificate of Vaccination card proving that you have the required vaccinations (eg yellow fever). While you might be able to get the shots at the border it is much easier (and possibly safer) to get them at home before you travel. I would also recommend keeping a ...


11

I am a "bouncer" in Boston. As far as the state of Massachusetts goes, it is very clear: Boston bars must ID all people who appear to be under the age of 30. Acceptable identification includes: U.S drivers license, U.S liquor identification, U.S military card, and all U.S. and international passports recognized by the U.S. What is NOT accepted: ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible