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19

You can drive in any US state with a drivers license from any other US state. However, if your residence is no longer in CT, then you must get an OR driver's license. You can read the address FAQ on the OR DOT site, but basically it says if you change your residence, you need to change your address with the DMV. As long as you are in OR temporarily (there'...


10

Haven't been to Oregon but the way it works in New Jersey where law is the same is as follows: You pull up to the gas station. You wait in the car until an attendant comes. You give him Cash and he pumps the gas. Credit card behavior vary depending on the types of pumps installed. In some gas stations pumps cannot be activated unless an attendant uses his ...


7

There are plenty of buses to Eugene from other cities. From Eugene there is a bus to the McKenzie River Ranger Station a few times a day https://goo.gl/maps/UypiSvpMkk12 From there, its a 10 mile hike. Could make a nice little backpacking overnight trip.


7

As a life long Oregonian, I can answer. You pull up to the pump, the attendant comes to your window, and you give them your card or cash, and tell them how much you want (usually filled, but I've asked for $20 before, especially when I pay with cash). They fill the tank, give you the receipt, and off you go. It is illegal to pump your own, and you can be ...


5

You can drive in Oregon with a CT license. That is the easy part. If you change your state of residence, most states require that you change your license. Since you have registered your vehicle in Oregon, and not CT, the Oregon DMV (and any police officers you happen to meet) may wonder whether you are really a CT resident. This may be helpful, too: http:...


5

I would avoid the coast. My experience is in California, where there is a well-known pattern of heavy fog and clouds near the coast in May and June (they call it "May gray" and "June gloom"). I don't know for sure, but I would expect similar conditions further north as well. However, often one can find clear skies just a few miles inland. Deserts are ...


3

If where you are planning to stay is a campground, technically the answer is no. What I have done in the past, however, is take a water-resistant blanket/poncho, tie it to my car, or a couple poles, then sleep in my car. When asked by officials, I was ready with my answer: I WAS sleeping under my lean to, but I got cold/wet/swarmed with ants. According to ...


3

In general, no, you don't have to, particularly if you're just looking for a bed for one night, and aren't terribly picky. That said, the later you choose to pull off the road - particularly in peak travel season - the more likely you are to be greeted by that dreaded "No Vacancy" sign. (Or, in nicer establishments, a polite refusal at the front desk.) My ...


3

From Article 4, Section 1 of the United States Constitution: Full Faith and Credit shall be given in each State to the public Acts, Records, and judicial Proceedings of every other State. This means that documents issued in one state will work in any other, including drivers licenses. As others have said, if you move, you'll need to update, but this ...


3

If you've truly never driven on ice or snow before, my recommendation is: neither. A winding mountain road is not the place to be learning. The first time you try to stop, you will skid, the first time you take a corner, you will be going too fast, and it's much better to do so in a place where the worst that can happen is that a tow truck needs to pull ...


3

After some time with Google, I believe the answer is no. There is no problem going inland via Sacramento, either by bus or train. I don't know Greyhound's stop-off policy. I believe with advance notice, Amtrak allows one. There are a great number of fine tourist attractions on that route, but it isn't what the OP asked for. Greyhound runs a service up 101 ...


3

For the first part of your journey, I'd suggest using the train. The Amtrak Cascades service runs between Vancouver and Eugene in Oregon: You can find their timetable on their website, but a few of the services are actually buses. I'd suggest trying for the train rather than the bus, as the views can be better! You can save some money by booking in ...


2

The validity of your International Driving Permit is of no consequence. If your Iraq Driving License is still valid AND you have both your IDP & Iraqi license in your possession, then yes you can drive in Oregon and the rest of the USA. If your Iraqi driving license has expired, then no you can not drive until you either renew it or obtain an Oregon ...


2

Google Maps actually can be a good resource for this, though you'll have to do some manual searching. The key is to look for light green spaces in the map view (not the earth view...and this could be a problem if you're colorblind). When you zoom in sufficiently, in most of these the name of that area will appear. You can then click on the name to get more ...


2

If you go to http://tripcheck.com, you can get the Oregon Department of Transportation's report on road conditions. In particular, the little blue circles on the map indicate "snow zones"; you can click them for information on how much snow is on the road, etc. Also noted are chain requirements; it seems that all of them are marked "Carry chains regardless ...


1

You cannot overnight inside of most National Parks in your car, but you can in the National Forests than surround them. Crater Lake, for example, is surrounded by Umpquah National Forest. You can boondocks there for free. This screen shot from the "public lands" app for iPhone shows it: There are two "dispersed camping" areas- Twin Lakes and a shelter. ...



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