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11

It depends what you define as Northern Ontario and how much you want to see. Some places (Moosonee and Moose Factory for example) are train only. Many are bus only. You can fly to Sudbury on a regularly scheduled commercial flight. Heck, some people might consider Peterborough or Barrie to be northern, and you can take Go Transit (commuter trains and buses) ...


8

Depending on your budget the service that would be the least hassle, and the most flexible would probably be bus. The train doesn't stop too many places up there unless your'e going into the interior on Ontario Northland (and that's only because you can choose where to stop), and VIA isn't the cheapest option out there.


8

Your best bet for public transport access to the Ontario North is Ontario Northland. They run scheduled buses from Toronto to the north, including Temagami (but not Hiawatha, wherever that is). It is quite a trip, stopping at various small towns you won't get to otherwise. If you want to get to the real remote areas your best bet is the Polar Bear Express ...


6

The Train looks to be quite a good bet to me. It looks like Kingston is on the main Montreal-Toronto line, for which seat61 has lots of details. I just asked Via Rail for details for a random weekday in about a fortnight's time. There are 10 trains per day, a web special advanced purchase tickets start at $56 (but are mostly sold out for 2 weeks time, so ...


5

If you are looking for something that is a bit more outdoorsy than a 'private lodge', then may I suggest a yurt? These are wooden huts, usually designed for six or eight and with a stove, perfectly suited to winter camping. There are yurts at Mew Lake campground in Algonquin Park, The Pinery on Lake Huron, and Killarney - all several hours from Toronto. ...


5

I have a recollection of taking a trip (some decades ago) between the Niagara Falls and Toronto, and seeing a number of farms along the way. In your shoes, I might take that route during the fall, and talk to some farmers, and see what they have to say about lodges. If all else fails, I'd think about spending the vacation in someone's farmhouse or barn. ...


4

I own Red Deer Log Cabins, in Madawaska. The location is about a 20 minute drive from the east gate on highway 60. On a quiet sideroad, and a beautiful west facing waterfront with a sand beach, my place is often used as an affordable base camp for those wanting to spend time in Algonquin Park. Please check my site. You can find reviews on TripAdvisor. I ...


4

Camping is always an option and is easy enough, but it may not be what you consider "similar" to roofed accommodation. Other than the ranger cabins your other option appears to be one of the three lodges in the park: Arowhon Pines Resort Bartlett Lodge Killarney Lodge All three are inside the park, just off Highway 60. Other than that, Tripadvisor has ...


4

From the Ontario Parks website: Reservations are NOT always necessary at Ontario Parks; even during busy summer weekends. You can reserve a campsite at most parks five months in advance of your date of arrival. Reservations can be made online or by contacting our call centre at 1-888-ONT-PARK. Some of our most popular parks such as Killbear, Sandbanks ...


2

The Google route shows tolls for three consecutive segments of that route, but actually it's just one toll: at the Peace Bridge. The toll is roughly $3.


2

I think you have already googled, but maybe this site can help you: http://www.cottage-resort.com/ However the site looks really weird, but I think to get some information it is okay.


1

I used to live in a town called Penetanguishene, Ontario. This is about 1 hour and 45 minutes away from toronto. There; There is a beautiful, easy going, campground called Awenda Provincial Park. It's a great place to go camping by yourself. The link below is where it is on google maps. ...



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