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11

It depends what you define as Northern Ontario and how much you want to see. Some places (Moosonee and Moose Factory for example) are train only. Many are bus only. You can fly to Sudbury on a regularly scheduled commercial flight. Heck, some people might consider Peterborough or Barrie to be northern, and you can take Go Transit (commuter trains and buses) ...


8

Depending on your budget the service that would be the least hassle, and the most flexible would probably be bus. The train doesn't stop too many places up there unless your'e going into the interior on Ontario Northland (and that's only because you can choose where to stop), and VIA isn't the cheapest option out there.


8

Your best bet for public transport access to the Ontario North is Ontario Northland. They run scheduled buses from Toronto to the north, including Temagami (but not Hiawatha, wherever that is). It is quite a trip, stopping at various small towns you won't get to otherwise. If you want to get to the real remote areas your best bet is the Polar Bear Express ...


7

Legally speaking, yes, if you have the Ontario Pleasure Craft Operator license you can rent and operate a boat in Ontario waters. The requirements to get the card are indeed pretty minimal - a knowledge of safety regulations and some basic boating is all that is required, and given the nature of the test you don't even need to remember that for very long. In ...


6

The Train looks to be quite a good bet to me. It looks like Kingston is on the main Montreal-Toronto line, for which seat61 has lots of details. I just asked Via Rail for details for a random weekday in about a fortnight's time. There are 10 trains per day, a web special advanced purchase tickets start at $56 (but are mostly sold out for 2 weeks time, so ...


6

Speaking broadly, it is very hard to come by public lockers or other short-term options anywhere in the U.S., compared to Europe or Japan. Their elimination has been going on for some time, starting with concerns over illegal drugs and then terrorism— and fear of the associated legal liabilities. There are a few left luggage or "parcel check" services in ...


5

You can check fall colours on websites that show maps or give text reports: https://www.ontariotravel.net/publications/fallcolourreport.pdf is text only, updated once a week. Currently says "Many long-time Algonquin Park fall colour watchers are predicting the peak Sugar Maple colour to be later than the September 27 average of the past 40 years." ...


5

The 30,000 Islands is a big area (as the name kind of implies). A paddle boat or rowboat is not going to cover more than a tiny fraction of them. However if that's OK for your uncle, then there are several places you can rent boats in the 30,000 Islands area. Essentially you need to look for a marina on Georgian Bay rather than some other lake. Two places ...


5

Camping is always an option and is easy enough, but it may not be what you consider "similar" to roofed accommodation. Other than the ranger cabins your other option appears to be one of the three lodges in the park: Arowhon Pines Resort Bartlett Lodge Killarney Lodge All three are inside the park, just off Highway 60. Other than that, Tripadvisor has ...


5

If you are looking for something that is a bit more outdoorsy than a 'private lodge', then may I suggest a yurt? These are wooden huts, usually designed for six or eight and with a stove, perfectly suited to winter camping. There are yurts at Mew Lake campground in Algonquin Park, The Pinery on Lake Huron, and Killarney - all several hours from Toronto. ...


5

I have a recollection of taking a trip (some decades ago) between the Niagara Falls and Toronto, and seeing a number of farms along the way. In your shoes, I might take that route during the fall, and talk to some farmers, and see what they have to say about lodges. If all else fails, I'd think about spending the vacation in someone's farmhouse or barn. ...


4

I own Red Deer Log Cabins, in Madawaska. The location is about a 20 minute drive from the east gate on highway 60. On a quiet sideroad, and a beautiful west facing waterfront with a sand beach, my place is often used as an affordable base camp for those wanting to spend time in Algonquin Park. Please check my site. You can find reviews on TripAdvisor. I ...


4

Just to report back what I found: There is no place to store a bag on the Michigan side though there are several hotels I didn't try. There were indeed lockers inside the Station Mall on the Ontario side.


4

From the Ontario Parks website: Reservations are NOT always necessary at Ontario Parks; even during busy summer weekends. You can reserve a campsite at most parks five months in advance of your date of arrival. Reservations can be made online or by contacting our call centre at 1-888-ONT-PARK. Some of our most popular parks such as Killbear, Sandbanks ...


4

From the Friends of Algonquin page on bears: Although Black Bears are reasonably common in Algonquin Park with the population thought to be around 2,000 (about one for every three square kilometres) there is no particularly good place for them and you will have to be very lucky to see one. ... In most cases, a bear will hear or smell you before you ...


3

You will be able to rent a bike from The Lake of Two Rivers Store. The operating dates: May to mid-October (7 days a week), 7:00am to 9:00pm â—¦ except August 25, 2015, open 7:00am to 5:30pm


3

Absolutely! Conservation areas often have them. Here's a picture I took in 2010 from a lookout at the Fleetwood Creek conservation area in Kawartha Lakes: There are plenty of others in the area. Are you looking to go north or south of Peterborough? Would you like to get a lake involved as well? The leaves are good right now in this area by the way. I got ...


3

According to their website, Killarney provincial park is served by the Park Bus. Looking at the schedules of the bus from Toronto it seems that either the bus runs only in August and in the beginning of October, or that all the other seats have been already booked. Looking on other travelling sites yields the same result: the only other public transport ...


2

I think you have already googled, but maybe this site can help you: http://www.cottage-resort.com/ However the site looks really weird, but I think to get some information it is okay.


2

Hi the page you linked to gives you the clues you need, but is not very clear. For long distance coach bus travel it's usual to book in advance. The can-ar coach schedule that includes Moore Falls lists agents where you can purchase tickets. http://www.can-arcoach.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/HaliburtonLine.pdf You can also make purchase tickets / ...


2

The Google route shows tolls for three consecutive segments of that route, but actually it's just one toll: at the Peace Bridge. The toll is roughly $3.


2

In general, no, there is no off-roading allowed in Algonquin Park, although there are mountain bike trails. The paved roads are the standard allowable routes by vehicle into the park. Beyond this you have to either backpack or canoe. No float planes or dirt bikes are allowed either.


2

The vast majority of Ontario Provincial Parks are road-oriented. The campsites are clustered together on a little group of roads near the lake/river/beach around which the park is sited. This map of Sandbanks is typical: The parks with backcountry are the exception: Algonquin, Killarney, and Quetico are the big ones, but you can find others on the parks ...


1

The worst case scenario is that you do not reach your destination at all. In extreme cases, trains break down completely and travellers are completely stuck for hours. Drivers may be stuck in cars for hours if a severe blizzard hits. Cyclists and pedestrians may head back within minutes when everything is flooded. If a tornado or earthquake destroys the ...


1

Mono Cliffs Provincial Park has some excellent hiking. It includes a small lake (really more of a good-sized pond) called McCarston's Lake, which can be hiked to: (Picture from Flickr user jbcurio, used under Creative Commons License.) There are also various smaller streams and ponds running through the park. There are two things, however, that may not ...


1

There is now an iPhone and iPad app that will do this. It's called Tolls Calculator USA & Canada and you can download it for free in iTunes.


1

I used to live in a town called Penetanguishene, Ontario. This is about 1 hour and 45 minutes away from toronto. There; There is a beautiful, easy going, campground called Awenda Provincial Park. It's a great place to go camping by yourself. The link below is where it is on google maps. ...



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