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12

No visa is required for transiting in Japanese airports if you have immediate flight connections regardless of nationality. Anyway, there is a Japanese transit visa which is intended for people who have longer layovers before transiting and want to go sightseeing or resting in Japan for few days (up to 15 days).


12

I'm not sure about the visa part, but about the time: By the cheapest train I seem to recall Narita airport is about two hours from Tokyo. Also you might well have to be back at the airport at least one hour before boarding, and quite possibly more. And the train system in Japan is notoriously complex. It will be very easy to get a bit lost and miss your ...


11

You can take the airport shuttle (Airport Limousine Bus) direct from Haneda (International Terminal) to Narita (Terminal 1 then Terminal 2) for 3,100 JPY. It comes fairly regularly (roughly hourly) and takes around 95 minutes. The earliest departure is 06:25. Alternatively you can take the train. The best route depends on time of arrival, but your main ...


10

Per GCMap, the route flies clearly south of Japan's Okinawa island chain, and thus does not enter the ADIZ. Of course actual flight routings will vary from the ideal great circle route, but usually not by much. (courtesy Great Circle Mapper) Also, Singapore has stated that they will file flight plans with Chinese authorities. Not entirely sure if this ...


9

For the visa part, the rules are (from Timaticweb): Visitors continuing their journey to a third country within 72 hours can obtain a Shore Pass/Transit Pass on arrival, provided: being able to prove to Japanese immigration that Shore/Transit Pass will be appropriately used; and departing from the same airport of arrival; or departing from ...


9

I am an Indian passport holder working in the US on H1B. I was supposed to fly LAX-Narita-KL-Bangalore on 23rd December 2012 with a 14 hour overnight layover in Narita. I received a call from the airline 2 days before my scheduled departure, stating that new rules at Narita dictate that travelers absolutely need a transit visa for overnight layovers in ...


9

The Narita Express train runs straight from Tokyo Narita to Shinjuku. Route map: Bear in mind that Shinjuku is a huge station and that it's quite easy to get lost or turned around in it. In light of that it may be helpful to figure out which exit you want to take in advance. Here's a map of the exists: ...


8

From SleepingInAirports: Sleeping in airports is generally frowned upon in all Japanese airports. While the terminal is open, you will likely be approached by a security officer who will ask to see your travel documents It also links to a quote from the Narita website, although I can't find the quote on that page. Aircraft operating hours is ...


6

They made a press release in 2010 about this service. The advertised domain for this service, specially targeted at backpackers, does not exist anymore, so I would assume this service is discontinued. If you are willing to pay a bit more (¥2,700), you can use the Airport limousine bus to bring you from Narita to Asakusa.


6

Yes, your I94 will be taken out of the passport when you are leaving from Guam to Japan. You will have to fill out a new one once you enter US territory again. The only exception for this rule is when you go to Canada or Mexico for less than 30 days. This is a completely normal procedure and pretty much the same anywhere else in the world. If your visa for ...


6

A stopover is typically a stay in one city of 24 hours or more. In your case, you actually have just a connection in Tokyo. Connections can even go across airports in the same metropolitan area, such as between London's Heathrow and Gatwick airports. Very rarely are visas required for connections in the same airport, since you do not need to clear ...


6

2-3pm is not rush hour in Tokyo. However, many central subway stations in Tokyo will require you to climb flights of stairs to enter, exit or transfer lines, which is not much fun with large bags, and while there's usually a single elevator somewhere, this can add a lengthy detour. If you can tell me exactly where you're going, I can try to recommend a ...


5

First off, don't worry. Japanese train stations have extensive signposting in English and trains run like clockwork. If it's not too late, I'd suggest changing your flights to Nagoya (Chubu/NGO) instead if at all possible. There's a direct bus from Chubu to Toyota (1:18, ¥1750), so this would shave a good three hours off your travel time and save ...


5

The Narita Shinsoji Temple is quite close (8 minutes by train) to Narita airport and is quite delightful. Before Narita Airport was made, it was the main attraction in the area. You want to take the JR or Keisei train from "Narita Airport" to "Narita Station". You can access the temple website here: http://www.naritasan.or.jp/english/


5

It's years since I did this but the airport limousine bus went straight to the hotel (Shinjuku Washington in my case). It looks like it still does. This avoids the need to navigate Shinjuku station just after arriving in Japan, as well as the need to get from the station to the hotel with your luggage -- if the bus stops at your hotel (or the one next ...


4

Well, you have a problem with staying in the airport, first Narita is 24 hours but I recall from flying through there late at night that it's mostly shutdown after 10pm (things start to close at 8pm), so you'll find no food or drink. Sleeping In Airports agrees with me and also has this to say: Sleeping in airports is generally frowned upon in all ...


4

It would be a big hassle. There are some temporary bag storage facilities in Narita but they all require you to exit the sterile transit area. She would need to have a visa (or visa waiver) as well as pick up the checked luggage, which most likely was checked right through.


3

If your friend is American (or other no-visa-needed country) and the layover is a reasonable time (more than a couple of hours) then she will have no problems clearing immigration and customs. It takes about an hour, most of that time is waiting in line and for the bags. Unlike Amerika, Narita has baggage storage in the airport, your bag (officially hers for ...


3

In practice, if you want to do it yourself online, you have to use the “multi-city ticket” option, i.e. instead of looking for a return ticket and then somehow adding stopovers, you would search for a trip with four legs: Jakarta-San Francisco, San Francisco-Los Angeles, Los Angeles-Tokyo, and finally Tokyo-Jakarta. Multi-city searches are not available ...


3

As usual, Hyperdia will show you all available train connections, just be careful to choose "Narita Airport Terminal 1" (or 2) as your departure station and not just "Narita" (the latter is located in downtown Narita city). The Narita Express is the only direct rail link between Narita airport and Shinjuku, but it is also the most expensive one. However, ...


3

ANA and United are partner airlines in the Star Alliance. You should be able to check your baggage all the way through from Taipei to Houston. If you have one booking/ticket they will do it automatically. If you have two separate bookings, then you will need to show your second ticket so they can enter the necessary baggage tracking details. If by some ...


3

Many visitors in your situation find their time in Tokyo quite disappointing. Tokyo is far from Narita*, confusing, and crowded. The best sights in Tokyo are the temples, but there is a superb temple complex in Narita city. Stay in Narita. *This should improve when the new train line is completed.


3

The Keisei Skyliner also offers two more options which are cheaper than the Airport Limousine Bus. They offer from Narita Terminal 1/2 a train to Asakusa for ¥1,280 (about $12.5) on the Narita Sky Access Line and ¥1,090 (about $10) on the Keisei Main Line. Here's a full PDF map for the same.


2

You can leave a suitcase in a coin locker (can be paid by Suica also for those in T1) for up to 8 days. There are also some baggage storage companies, but their websites are only in Japanese.


2

I don't know of any long-term storage like that. There are plenty of luggage courier services at the airport who would be able to courier your suitcase anywhere in Japan for around $20USD. I'd just courier it to your relatives. You can either pick it up from them when you leave, or they can take it to any convenience store and get it sent to the airport ...


2

Yes, you will need a visa, as you'll be entering the country. The Philippines are not among the visa exempt countries for visiting Japan, and the Japan embassy in the Philippines has a list of all relevant documents / info that you may need. Narita and Haneda are almost 50 miles apart, so you definitely have to exit the airport to get to the other. We have ...


1

To clarify what you have stated in your question: You have a connection at Narita Airport, where you are switching airlines. ANA and United both fly to Terminal 1, so no need to worry about getting from one terminal to another Your passport/nationality requires you to get a transit visa for Japan You made two separate bookings, thus the need to claim ...


1

No, definitely not enough time to get to Tokyo and back comfortably, but you have enough time to visit Narita town (train works well), have a nice BBQ eel (unagi) lunch and do some shopping.


1

Just in case you haven't checked a map, Narita Airport is about 2 hours from central Tokyo. Haneda is 30 minutes. Yes, Shinjuku and Shibuya are 24-hour places of interest, but do you really want to overnight there between long-haul flights, with your baggage in tow? There are many hotels in Hamamatsucho ( one train from Haneda ). You can explore a bit in ...


1

Haneda unlike Narita, is almost at the heart of Tokyo. In less than 40 minutes you can get to Shibuya a sleepless city. And 19:00 is still too early.Trains usually run until after midnight In case you are tired and want to catch some sleep there are always the "Manga Kisha" (cyber cafes with internet, Mangas, movies) with reclining sofa, showers, free drinks ...



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