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28

Unless you plan to read/watch something written in Nynorsk, you should go for Bokmål. Most Norwegian has this as their written language, and it's close to what is spoken in the Oslo/Hurum-area. Bokmål and Nynorsk are not that different though... Riksmål is sort of the old-fashioned version of Bokmål (basically the name was changed to Bokmål in 1929), as ...


26

First of all, as a tourist in Norway you will be able to get by with English. Nobody expects tourists to have learned any of the Norwegian languages. I do not speak Norwegian but a friend of my does, learned it as a foreigner, and has a good view on the languages as she has lived in several areas. If you want to learn a few words, just to be polite, it ...


13

As a native of Norway, I need to clarify something: Bokmål, Riksmål and Nynorsk are not spoken dialects. They are written languages. You cannot learn to speak or listen to them, you can only learn to read and write them. These three written languages are so similar that people who know one of them can easily read and understand something written in any of ...


6

Yes, but for no more than 3 months. Source: http://www.vegvesen.no/en/Driving+licences/About+Driving+licences/Foreign+driving+licences+in+Norway http://www.vegvesen.no/en/Driving+licences/About+Driving+licences/Foreign+driving+licences+in+Norway/Issued+outside+the+EU+EEA


5

In principle yes, you can do that. Posten (the Norwegian Post) still offers 'poste restante' service, where you can have letters or parcels addressed to any post office or service counter for pickup. It might however be, that the Swedish merchant doesn't cooperate, since using non-regular recipient addresses is often used in cases of fraud. If you go to the ...


4

Both Worldstandards.eu and the IEC maintain pages on the types of sockets in use around the world. The UK uses Type G almost universally (there's the odd exceptions of "Shaver sockets" in bathrooms and some hotels have a strange, round 3 pin setup for lighting only). So you need something that will take your Nowergian C/F plugs and convert them to G. You'll ...


4

First of all, both Hamar and Lillehammer are located at the Lake Mjøsa, so there will be no net elevation change along the way. The pilgrim's path does not follow the shore though, so there are some light to moderate inclines along the way, but always accompanied with following descents. Except from telling you that, noone here will be able to tell you ...


4

The answer given by Tor-Einar Jarnbjo is correct, but I'll like to add some important, but little known information. Regardless of reason for cancellation, you can get governmental taxes and charges reimbursed. No one gives away money for free and for fun, so you will have to fill out a hard-to-find-form, and pay a fee.


4

Went to Norway last week, did a lot of research to find gas canisters. We landed on Rygge on a Saturday evening, and there is a Shell not far from the railway station with a seven eleven, we bought them there. When we wanted to drop off our spare gas at the DNT hut in gjendesheim, the guy there said they have about 100 spare ones of those lying around, so if ...


3

There is! On the quay side in Stavanger, near the ferry terminal, is quite a fancy modernist building housing the Norwegian Petroleum Museum (Norsk Oljemuseum) Virtually the whole museum is bilingual, so both Norwegians and English speakers can enjoy visiting. It's divided into quite a few sections, covering the history, geology, engineering, development, ...


3

If you enter the locker area from the ground floor (not via the escalators), then by the lost property desk are a handy set of baggage sizers, so you can quickly work out what size you need! They look like this, rucksack included to help with a sense of size Having worked out what size you want, you then wander round the banks of lockers (of which there ...


3

I called the passenger information number in Immingham and spoke with a live agent... Foot passengers who do not have a vehicle will not be permitted to board on either side; Passengers on push bikes may be permitted to board in the Immingham, unclear for the Brevik side; The entry point in Immingham is covered by the same Statutory Instrument governing ...


3

No, that will not work When you depart from Norway towards a non-Schengen country, such as the UK, you will go through Schengen exit formalities. Norway will stamp you out. You'll then fly to London, to do which you'll need to show the airline in question that you're eligible to transit without a visa, which not all nationalities are. See Is there a way to ...


3

According to http://driveeuropenews.com/2015/01/21/sweden-21/ The final UK-Scandinavia ferry service, operated by DFDS between Harwich and Esbjerg, Denmark, was withdrawn last September And the start of services – likely between Newcastle, Bergen and Stavanger – the following March So 2016 March might just see the resumption of ferry service ...


3

The thing you have to watch with bringing appliances with french and german style plugs into the UK is that most readilly available "visitor" adaptors will connect the live and neutral but not the earth. Also adaptors bought from dodgy sellers (in particular the likes of amazon marketplace) may well lack the fuse that is considered an important safety ...


3

If you want to go trekking close to Oslo, I recommend Nordmarka, often just called Marka. Have a look at the official website here, for some information. There are many good starting points in Marka, including Holmenkollen, Frognerseteren, Sørkedalen, and Sognsvann. Many of which are easily accessible by tram or bus. Once in Marka, you can stay at some ...


2

While the main roads in Norway are well maintained in winter and easily navigable for anyone comfortable driving, the experience can be very different than regular summer driving. There are several issues here: Most main roads outside Eastern Norway are two-lane only, without any barrier separating traffic in opposite directions. You can examine road ...


2

Lack of earthing will not normally stop a device from working, neither will live-neutral reversal. I think by far the most likely explanation is the adaptor is faulty and/or poorly made. Also "type C" is a vague description. Can you take a photo of the plug on your laptop charger?


2

It's not normal--the plug should work in either orientation. Since it doesn't, I imagine that there is some lack of contact occurring inside the adapter, perhaps because your plug pins are a bit bent or misaligned. If you have another adapter, try it. If not, you can plug your Type C plug directly into the Type G outlet if you first defeat the safety ...


2

You actually have a pretty decent number of options in the summer! For those just wanting to look at Pulpit Rock, without wanting to hike up it, there's a daily cruise from Stavanger through Lysefjorden which leaves around lunchtime. If you want to both hike and cruise the fjord, they also have a cruise+hike option which leaves earlier, cruises round the ...


2

If your visa is really only valid for Norway, then you do need another visa to go through Germany (and it needs to be a regular Schengen visa or possibly a special German visa but not merely an “airport transit visa” because you need to be able to enter the Schengen area in Germany). If you had such a visa, it would actually be more likely that you would be ...


2

According to the official website it is very easy to get to Lom or Skjåk with 4 daily buses from Oslo.


2

The Gjendesheim cabin does not open until mid June and the buses do not operate in the off-peak season. I don't know when you are planning to go in September, but I would expect the buses to stop operating around mid September. Time tables for this summer are not available yet. Since the Norwegian Railways and many bus companies operate with demand-based ...


2

As a general rule: If you can get there by bus, you can get there by car. There are of course cases where there are restrictions regarding private cars, but that's not the case for the places you're asking about. Steinsdalsfossen og Vøringsfossen are both on FV-7. Have a look at route plan in Google Maps to see how to get there. Folgefonna is large, and ...


1

It's not all that difficult to learn to speak the language (Bokmål as pointed out in the other answers posted) a bit, but you'll probably not be able to understand the reply you'll get. Norwegians speak by stringing words in a common sentences together, such sentences are pronounced like one large word. So, if you watch this, it looks like quite easy to ...


1

Yes, there's probably a lot of snow in late March! The first screenshot below shows the height profile of the Bergen - Voss bike ride. As you can see, the highest point is 464 m.a.s.l at Kvamskogen. The second screenshot shows the weather and snow depth in 2015 at Kvamskogen. In late March 2015 there was approximately 150 cm of snow. There's a fair ...



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