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8

The Royal Palace is easily reachable by foot from the train station - just follow Karl Johans gate ("gate" is Norwegian for "street", not an actual gate). Aker Brygge is a nice place to watch the harbour. The Norwegian National Opera and Ballet is also nearby if you're interested. Akershus Fortress from 1290 and the Viking Ship Museum should fit the ...


6

Not on that visa, no, as it's outside its period of validity. However, if you really, really want to go before February 4th, your only option at present would be to obtain a new visa that covers the period you actually want to travel.


6

Norwegian LowFare tickets for flights within the Nordic countries can be canceled without charge within 4 hours after the booking. After that, the tickets are non-refundable. If it's any help, you can however until 30 minutes before departure change the name, destination or time by paying a fee. Depending on whether or not you have further plans to fly, that ...


5

TRD is a relatively small airport (as compared to Dusseldorf for example). In addition to that, your flight is inside the Schengen area, this means that there are no customs/passport checks, no lines to wait in. Therefore you walk out of the plane, go straight into the baggage claim, get your bag and then walk to the bus stop. One hour is more than ...


5

No you cannot. They won't even let you board on the plane to Norway (or any other destination where you need a valid visa) if it seems you won't be able to legally enter the country at the arrival time. Taking a flight the day before would in that sense be acceptable in case of an overnight journey, but that doesn't seem to be your case.


4

Actually, the rules for airside transit do not apply. You will simply enter the Schengen area in Amsterdam. After that, you won't have any entries left on your visa but you can still fly to Norway. By contrast, you could not go to the UK and reenter the Schengen area, even if you just wanted to transit airside in the UK. As far as the number of entries is ...


4

Both December 25th and 26th are public holidays in Norway and also on the 28th (being a Sunday), all "regular" shops will be closed. Smaller grocery stores and souvenir shops may however be open. I checked the opening hours for a few of the most popular museums in Bergen and none of them mention special opening hours for the week between Christmas and New ...


4

Renting in Scandinavia is quite expensive: I found quotes for 5000 SEK for a week for a touring MC (that's dirty cheap and not representative), plus extra for accessories (2000 SEK for complete set of helm, bags etc.), plus 1 SEK/km, plus cost of accommodation (500 SEK/person on average for a reasonable accommodation, in Norway even more expensive), plus ...


4

It's probably too late for the OP, but for future visitors this may help. When we visited Tromsø in February 2013 we simply rented a car and drove outside the city to see the Aurora. We were completely at our own leisure. Their is a tunnel on Kvaloya island, west of Tromsoya just a few kilometers (turn south when you get to Kvaloya), and there is a parking ...


4

As you yourself checked and stated, you do not need a visa to visit either UK or Norway as a tourist (with an Australian passport). As long as your stay does not exceed maximum allowed (usually 90 days), you can travel freely between the two countries. I have heard anecdotal evidence that if you leave UK and come back "quickly", an immigration officer in ...


3

There is! On the quay side in Stavanger, near the ferry terminal, is quite a fancy modernist building housing the Norwegian Petroleum Museum (Norsk Oljemuseum) Virtually the whole museum is bilingual, so both Norwegians and English speakers can enjoy visiting. It's divided into quite a few sections, covering the history, geology, engineering, development, ...


3

I am not sure if you have read the Google translation you are linking to, because you're misquoting it. First of all, the minimum suggested transfer time between regional trains on the Trondheim - Oslo - Kristiansand lines (as in your case) is 60 minutes. The 30 minutes you refer to is the suggested transfer time between "other trains". The text does not ...


3

I have traveled in Norway on the train network and found it to be exceptionally punctual. However, the journey time from Trondheim to Oslo is around 7 hours, and you only need one small problem to crop up to end up having to pay for a extra segment to Kristiensand. The NSB website shows that it is a possible connection, but flags a warning. Looking at the ...


3

The answer given by Tor-Einar Jarnbjo is correct, but I'll like to add some important, but little known information. Regardless of reason for cancellation, you can get governmental taxes and charges reimbursed. No one gives away money for free and for fun, so you will have to fill out a hard-to-find-form, and pay a fee.


3

To answer the precise question, the lake is called "The Norwegian Sea". I wish I could say "And I've climbed that". I've done some peaks around Reine (the larger settlement on the west side of the fjord, Hamnøy being the old ferry quay before they built the bridge, and BTW on the right of the photographer, we are looking slightly east of north and behind ...


2

You've already gotten quite a few good answers, but most of them are focusing on the mountains to the north-east of the city center. I'll try to give a more thorough answer, including all of the 7 mountains, and how to reach them. First, let's look at a list of the 7 mountains: The 7 Mountains: Lyderhorn (396 MAMSL*) Damsgårdsfjellet (317 MAMSL) ...


2

The problem here is that most of the Norwegian mountain hiking area is a high plateau rather than an alpine range, and getting onto the plateau and into the hut network from the west can be arduous. Once you're up, however, you can hut-to-hut more easily. You might like to look at GRINDEFLETHYTTA. Accessible from the Bergen-Trondheim road before it drops ...


2

According to Norwegian myth, Santa Claus lives on the North Pole. I am not aware of any references in Norwegian fiction to Santa Claus living in a specific city, either in Norway or other countries, although the Wikipedia article mentions both Drøbak and Longyearbyen. I'm Norwegian, if that's a good enough source :)


2

If you enter the locker area from the ground floor (not via the escalators), then by the lost property desk are a handy set of baggage sizers, so you can quickly work out what size you need! They look like this, rucksack included to help with a sense of size Having worked out what size you want, you then wander round the banks of lockers (of which there ...


2

If your visa is really only valid for Norway, then you do need another visa to go through Germany (and it needs to be a regular Schengen visa or possibly a special German visa but not merely an “airport transit visa” because you need to be able to enter the Schengen area in Germany). If you had such a visa, it would actually be more likely that you would be ...


2

If you want to go trekking close to Oslo, I recommend Nordmarka, often just called Marka. Have a look at the official website here, for some information. There are many good starting points in Marka, including Holmenkollen, Frognerseteren, Sørkedalen, and Sognsvann. Many of which are easily accessible by tram or bus. Once in Marka, you can stay at some ...


2

Starting with the last question first, whether your phone will work on Norwegian carriers will depend on Whether it is unlocked What specific model it is You can check the first with your carrier in Canada and the wiki link above should have enough information. As for plans, you will probably want to just get a prepaid SIM. This is quite a bit more ...


2

The official travel guide, visitnorway.com has a useful page on using mobile phones in Norway, with a list of all the local operators and some tips on where to buy a SIM card. You could use that as a starting point to find out exactly what's on offer in Norway. Just about any monthly plan or prepaid/pay-as-you-go offer in Norway should include roaming ...


2

You actually have a pretty decent number of options in the summer! For those just wanting to look at Pulpit Rock, without wanting to hike up it, there's a daily cruise from Stavanger through Lysefjorden which leaves around lunchtime. If you want to both hike and cruise the fjord, they also have a cruise+hike option which leaves earlier, cruises round the ...


1

I've talked with Telenor. Telenor cooperates with KPN, T-Mobile and Vodafone in the Netherlands. The only answer they could provide was "your current provider should know what possible packages you can have, the prices for data traffic etc". I don't believe ARP or LBO is an option in Norway. Your best bet is probably prepaid coverage from NetCom. NetCom are ...


1

Well, according to traditional Norwegian myths, Santa Claus lives on the North Pole, as l0b0 says in his answer. However, in many parts of the world, if you do send a letter addressed to: Santa Claus The North Pole It will end up in Drøbak, where Santa will answer every single letter (note, in many countries (for instance the US) they send it elsewhere). ...


1

Lots will be closed. The Pepperkakebyen will be worth checking out, and you can still go on hikes around Bergen (the advent candles will be lit up at Fløyen). Also, look into going to the Lysfest if you are here in time. The biggest thing to consider are the grocery markets. Bunnpris usually stays open when others are closed, but I believe even they have ...



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