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20

It's a generally accepted fact that the Scandinavian countries are the most expensive places to travel. But personally, having travelled a lot within Europe and within Scandinavia, I don't think it's SO much more expensive in comparison to the rest of Europe. Where prices differ is generally when it comes to alcohol (much more expensive), junk ...


19

victoriah wrote in her answer: It's a generally accepted fact that the Scandinavian countries are the most expensive places to travel. But personally, having travelled a lot within Europe and within Scandinavia, I don't think it's SO much more expensive in comparison to the rest of Europe. I'm from Finland—another Nordic country generally ...


18

When importing food to Norway, you are not only affected by custom regulations (they are usually relevant when it comes to taxation of products), but you also have to adhere to the regulations from the Norwegian Food Safety Authority (Mattilsynet). The EU regulation 206/2009 is in effect in Norway and tells (page 12, paragraph 5) that you can bring 2kg of ...


13

You will find your answers on the website of the Norwegian customs authority. In my interpretation, you can import this honey to Norway, because: the goods are for you or are a private gift and not intended for sale or commercial use you bring the goods with you, either on your person or in your luggage The value is less than NOK 6,000 (approx. EUR 815). ...


12

The import laws cited on the the page of Norway's Toll Office do not distinguish between the manner the alcohol has been created (because that would likely be rather difficult); only by the strength. You're allowed for free (see the link for how much you have to pay if you need to import larger quantities): One litre of an alcoholic beverage containing ...


10

Hurtigruten is a passenger line that sails along the Norwegian coast, and the trip has been described as the "World's Most Beautiful Sea Voyage." It costs from €641 for a 6-day voyage. The disadvantage of this is that you're stuck on a boat. Earlier this year, the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation filmed 134 hours of Hurtigruta and showed it live. Your ...


10

If you are caught with smaller amounts of alcohol exceeding the allowed amount, the customs will offer you to accept a "forenklet forelegg", a kind of fixed rate fine used in the Norwegian legal system for minor issues, e.g. traffic violations or breach of the custom regulations. For beverages with 22.1 to 60% alcohol by volume, the rates are as such: up ...


9

There is a similar exchange for hitch-hikers in Norway called haikeren.no. I haven't used it, but I would find it strange if you find any offers for a ride on an odd route like Kiruna-Tromsø on a specific date. You can of course place your own ad to tell that you are looking for a ride, but I don't think the site is well known and much in use. Even if you ...


9

You can check Hurtigruten.


9

We stayed in Tromsø on december (2009) and we were really lucky according to what some locals tell us. As @froderik stated, they explained that the Aurora is common from december to march and rare rest of the year. We stayed 3 days the first week of december and took these photos that were "great for this epoch": Not very spectacular, but good for early ...


9

According to wikitravel Tromsø is in the "aurora belt" between 6pm and midnight and it is dark before 6pm between mid-october and mid-march. It goes on to say that the best time to visit for the aurora is december to mid/late march. It seems that you are just on the edge of the best circumstances with the 21st of march.


9

During the night, no buses operate away from the city. The cable car does not operate at night (except during summer). Bus 100 leaves for Setermoen at 21:00 (arriving 23:25), and you could get off at a dark spot, but a bus back won't depart before the morning, and you'll be very cold. The last public transportation arriving to Tromsø is the southbound ...


8

The Royal Palace is easily reachable by foot from the train station - just follow Karl Johans gate ("gate" is Norwegian for "street", not an actual gate). Aker Brygge is a nice place to watch the harbour. The Norwegian National Opera and Ballet is also nearby if you're interested. Akershus Fortress from 1290 and the Viking Ship Museum should fit the ...


7

With Norway, it is easier to point out what is cheap rather than what is expensive. In contrast to iHaveacomputer's answer, I find all kinds of fruit and vegetables cheap. That is because the fruit and vegetables are subsidized, and would otherwise cost a fortune. First Price is a low cost brand that provides cheaper alternatives, sometimes equal in ...


7

The Norwegian website yr.no is a good resource for weather information in Scandinavia. Looking at the information about Tromsø, among other things, there are live webcams on the bottom of the page, which, sadly, show that there is currently no snow at all there. Direct link to the webcams: here and here. See also detailed weather information, together with ...


7

Arguably, the national dish of Norway can be considered to be Fårikål - "sheep in cabbage" - pieces of mutton with bone, cabbage, whole black pepper and often a little wheat flour, cooked for several hours in a casserole, traditionally served with potatoes boiled in their jackets. In tradition, Norway's foods come from the natural food resources available ...


6

Traditional Norwegian dishes are usually based on fish and game. Given that Bergen is a port town, I suspect that there are some stellar restaurants that specialize in seafood. Here are a few restaurants that showed up on several sites as highly-rated; I browsed through the menus and they looked good, also: Potetkjelleren Restaurant ...


6

This being western Norway, fjords are everywhere. West Norway from Wikimedia Commons If you want to take the bus to Bergen, scroll down. This is probably interesting enough. You might also be interested in taking one of the coastal speedboats to Bergen or Stavanger. From there you might want to head to spectacular Preikestolen. I recommend reading the ...


6

I've never been to Norway, but I lived with a norweigan guy in Ireland for a year. Ireland is/was more expensive that most the rest of europe. He said that coming from Norway was great cause Ireland was cheaper than home, an experience not many visitors can say! I've heard anecdotially that Norway is more expensive that the rest of europe.


6

Using what kind of transportation? By plane, it's obviously no problem at all. Doing it by submarine is possible but hiring one for this purpose is probably not. A British expedition in 1982 crossed the arctic (from Canada via the north pole to Svalbard) using snow mobiles, but due to the difficult terrain (the arctic is covered by pack ice, which means ...


6

It's taken in Hamnøy, in the Lofoten island in Norway. You can even make out the specific mountain shown in your photo in the image included on the Wikipedia page.


6

What you're looking for is the Airport Express Train (Flytoget). It's about 20 minutes ride from the airport to the Oslo Central station. No need to book a ticket in advance, there's always seats available. For timetable, check out http://www.flytoget.no/eng/Stations/Flytoget-Airport-Express-train-station-at-Oslo-Airport. As for the ticket, you have two ...


5

Senorge.no has complete snowdepth information for the entire territory of Norway. They have both present and historical information. Currently, 8 August 2013, there is not much snow: However, it's also possible to obtain historical data, for example, from 1 June 2012: Or, indeed, from 24 January 2012: If you want to go skiing to mountain summits, ...


5

You should be aware of the distances involved. By far the easiest way to get there is to fly. Use the travel planner of your choice, and check the websites of Norwegian (a somewhat low-cost airline with less draconian luggage practices than Ryanair) and SAS (the flag carrier) to find out when it is cheapest to travel (apparently there are no direct flights ...


5

TRD is a relatively small airport (as compared to Dusseldorf for example). In addition to that, your flight is inside the Schengen area, this means that there are no customs/passport checks, no lines to wait in. Therefore you walk out of the plane, go straight into the baggage claim, get your bag and then walk to the bus stop. One hour is more than ...


4

Easily, just go for the Norway in a Nutshell route: You can experience the scenic Bergen Railway, the breathtaking Flåm Railway, the Aurlandsfjord, the narrow Nærøyfjord and the steep hairpin bends of Stalheimskleiva (May-September). The link above is to a commercial tour agency who will arrange the whole thing if you want (8.5 hours end to end), but ...


4

I found this site: carpoolworld.com with Norway listings, but the community here does not seem so big as Mitfahrzentrale or Mitfahrgelegenheit (in other countries also known as Carpooling). So, the answer would be: similar websites are popular in several European countries, but not in Norway in particular.


4

BoA Visa/Mastercard credit cards will work fine at Norwegian stores, and BoA debit cards with a Cirrus/Plus logo can be used to withdraw money from ATMs. This is almost certainly more cost-effective than exchanging your money, particularly if you do so in the US.


4

Norwegian flies from Trondheim to London Gatwick - the route map is a pain to work with but if you choose the normal booking form, then you'll see the list of destinations they fly to from Trondheim. Additionally, if you set SkyScanner to search for flights from Trondheim to 'United Kingdom' for month December 2011, you'll find a list of airlines that ...



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