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27

There is no nationally, or even locally mandated standard. I've certainly seen friends have no issues using both Passports and Drivers Licenses from their home country. I've also seen people have issues - especially when their ID is written in a non-latin script, or when they have a DOB which can be misread by using a non-American date ordering scheme, (i.e. ...


24

I'm afraid I can't find any government numbers to back up my anecdotal evidence, but Shinjuku, Shibuya and Ikebukuro are all very safe - much safer than their equivalents in London, New York or any other 'world' city. I've spent many nights in each, in varying states of sobriety, and never had any problems at all. I've lost my wallet a few times (on trains, ...


19

Each person has their own taste, so this questions is almost subjective. However, after living there for four years, I now know there are certain things that EVERY tourist seems to want to do or see. St Paul's. It's one of the greatest cathedrals in Europe, and I've heard people say it's their European highlight, the pinnacle of sights that they've seen. ...


17

Generally bars have always asked me for my passport in the US. It's frustrating as you'd rather not take your passport out to town, but when I've tried to take my driver's license as ID, I've either been turned away, or had to really ask nicely and still get told to bring my passport next time. In New Zealand, they're as strict - you either show a NZ ...


13

I've been to Japan twice now and have spent a good deal of time drinking in Tokyo. I've never had any issues. Hostess bars have a reputation for this kind of behaviour (i've never been to one so i can't speak to the truth of that reputation). I've never had any issues with drink spiking or credit card fraud, even when i've been drinking alone in Roppongi. ...


12

Yes, Japan has lots of them. More than you would think or can see on the street. The most dense accumulation of Bars is generally around busy subway and train stations, often under the arches of a railway bridge going through the city. You have to follow people in suits after business hours and will definitely find them. Specially around the 25th of a month ...


11

I am a "bouncer" in Boston. As far as the state of Massachusetts goes, it is very clear: Boston bars must ID all people who appear to be under the age of 30. Acceptable identification includes: U.S drivers license, U.S liquor identification, U.S military card, and all U.S. and international passports recognized by the U.S. What is NOT accepted: ...


10

I'm... not really sure what you're asking for. A "pub" is defined by Wikipedia as: a drinking establishment fundamental to the culture of Britain, Ireland, Australia, South Africa and New Zealand. So yes, there are pubs in Japan, but of course they're going to be British-themed, or Irish-themed or even Australian-themed because that's what a pub ...


9

Let me add to what you've seen here that it would be great to simply walk along the Thames, both banks ideally. So many things are so near each other, and the atmosphere is fantastic. This is a place that grew up around a river, so walking that river will show you the place. It's ancient and modern, traditional and ever changing, and I think the riverfront ...


9

I work in a grocery store as a cashier. We sell liquor. We can accept any state issued IDs for the US, as well as passports. We are not permitted to accept any other forms of ID. This is a corporate policy, but I doubt that it is unique. However if we get a passport we can't read, we need to have a manager look at it (like they can read it). I would not be ...


9

I've been to Japan only once, but it was touring with a band. We played in a different city pretty much every night. With the exception of one night, the venues were all bar/pub type places. Certainly not hostess bars and also not English themed pubs. There was a small stage, and always a bar and some seats. Because we've been to a these places every ...


8

I don't recall any bars in NYC having a dress code, so T-Shirt and Jeans should be fine as long as you don't come in looking like a complete bum. Having said that there are quite a few rooftop bars. Here is the list of some of them that have menus available. 230 Fifth The Heights The Local cafe But you can simply look at the top 10 list(?) to pick the ...


8

Well it's LONDON, so nearby bars and alcohol is almost redundant - they're everwhere ;) Until around 12 at least. Then the pubs close, and the nightlife and bars and clubs continue in certain areas. The obvious is Central London. Plenty of hostels and hotels. Lots of bars and clubs open late especially around the touristy Leceister Square area, and Old ...


8

Agree with Mark's list above. The catch though is that you've only three days, so the key thing is to prioritize. You could easily spend weeks doing nothing but visiting Museums in London and still only scratch the surface - I'd suggest perhaps taking a look at the museum web sites in advance, and pick just one (or two, if you're a big museum buff) that best ...


8

I would go further and say this is incredibly unlikely - if anywhere is going to sting you on cost they will do it 'legitimately' (that is, 'sitdown' charges, cover fees, high drink prices, 'door' charges etc). I have a friend who works in a hostess bar, and whilst the concept is still a little sleazy, they are still businesses and stick to charging ...


7

On top of the other listed attractions I would recommend Greenwich - mostly park and the observatory - which is on the UNESCO World Heritage List. If you have some spare time, you can link it with the nearby Canary Wharf - the new financial district - if you like modern city centres. On your way back to the centre, just before Tower Hill you have St. ...


7

While sites like Wikitravel don't seem to help too much in this case, fortunately we can look at anecdotal evidence and quotes on VirtualTourist pages like these. Quotes from these pages for a selection of clubs: "Dress Code: No jeans or sneakers/trainers, must be very fashionable." "Dress Code: No Jeans , shorts, or flip flops !!!!" "Dress ...


7

Mark's answer said it all! The only thing I would add is to attend an Evensong service at St. Paul's, or Westminster, or St. Martin in the Fields. They usually start at 5 (17:00) and the place will be closed then to tourists. Arrive during late afternoon, when tourist hours are still open, and just explain to the guards, staff, that you're staying for ...


7

The British Museum is free, and amazing! (If you like that sort of thing, and I do).


7

Most things are indeed closed, but there are some things that are open 24h and worthwhile, although knowing the season you're visiting would be helpful. Top of my list would be relaxing with a Arabic meal and a puff or ten of ''shisha'' (water pipe) at a good 24h restaurant. I have a soft spot for Kan Zaman, which has good food, good shisha, tolerable ...


6

There are plenty of small venues and clubs in London offering live local folk music. Here's a selection of them. I'd add to that list Jamboree in Limehouse, which has a great ambience and often includes younger folk acts in its international menu. You may catch bigger names such as the bands you list at higher capacity venues such as the Jazz Cafe, Union ...


6

I think Mark has covered the most of big ticket sights in his response. The V&A is one of my favourite museums and also well worth a look, and you'd be crazy not to check out the Tate Modern (after you've checked out St Paul's, you can get there by strolling across the Millennium Bridge). Some other good museums are the Museum of London and the Sir John ...


6

The main bar area is along Via de' Benci / Via Giuseppe Verdi, and some of the side streets. There are lots of different kinds of bars and some clubs there, starting from near the bridge (Ponte alle Grazie) until Via Pietrapiana, maybe 500 m north. See the map, just like the hostel guy drew it: The map I got from the hostel, with main bar area marked on ...


6

Some of these might be out of date, but the asylum.com has this list of top ten cigar bars in Las Vegas from 2010: Carmine's Little Italy Sport & Cigar Lounge Havana Club Cigar Lounge Andre's Monte Carlo Casa Fuente Fontana Bar Rhumbar Nine Fine Irishmen Baccarat Bar VooDoo Steak & Lounge Dino's Lounge


6

The National Minimum Drinking Age Act of 1984 set the legal age of public possession and purchasing to 21. Some states do allow consumption at younger age (just not purchase and possession in public). There does not seem to be a common standard on valid identification, it seems likely that the laws concerning age verification for alcohol consumption vary ...


6

Executive Summary In virtually any city there will be a combination of: Foreign Bars Standing Bars Food Bars Shot/Cocktail Bars Foreign Bars As explained by uncovery, there are many different chain Irish or British-style pubs. Dubliners, Pig & Whistle, Hub, Hobgoblin, and others. There are also non-chain local versions in less major cities. While ...


6

There is nothing much outside of the hotels, people tend to spend all of their time drinking and eating in the hotels. Therefore all inclusive deals are common and well worth considering. The hotel we stayed in charge well over £5 for a bottle of coke if you were not on the all inclusive deal! Sharm el Sheikh has nothing to offer apart from the weather, ...


5

The rooftop bar at Hotel Metro in midtown is unpretentious, cheap (by midtown standards), and gives you a pretty spectacular view of the Empire State building, though not a lot more (since you're more or less surrounded by tall buildings). They have no dress code. Top of the Strand (at the Strand Hotel) is similar to Hotel Metro - same neighborhood, same ...


5

Sure! Vancouver is famous for its seawall - the path running the whole way around, especially the downtown region. So in addition to Waterfront, you can go closer to Stanley Park and hit Coal Harbour. There are quite a few restaurants and bars down there, although sometimes quite pricey. The path continues all the way around Stanley Park, and back on the ...


5

Granville Island is the first place that comes to mind. It's not far from downtown (just across the Granville St. Bridge) and is right down on the water with lots of restaurants.



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