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2

One way out of the 'need €20 on the OV chip card for the train journey' on the way back to Schiphol is using a bus. I recently researched and found that there is a bus from Leidseplein which does not take more time than traveling from Leidseplein to Centraal station and on to the airport. Bus 197 which costs € 3.09 on your chip card. I used http://9292.nl/en ...


1

Indeed, it means that on that day, the train will not run as usual. However, only a portion will be different. The ICBrussels train runs between Amsterdam and Brussels, through Den Haag and Roosendaal. According to the message you saw, your train will run only between Roosendaal and Brussels. You will have to find another way to go from Den Haag to ...


2

I have run your journey on the Dutch as well as the International version of the NS rail planner and on neither I get a warning for works on the tracks. It might have been that you have checked your journey on a day there were works, but I do not see any advertised for 24th of May, 2015. It might be that there will be work on the tracks but at this time the ...


1

My American debit card has been inserted into ATMs in at least twelve European countries. It has zero surcharge (one reason I choose it, I use a different card inside the USA). I generally travel with about $200 US for an emergency if an ATM can't be found. Then I withdraw the equivalent of $200–$300 in local currency. The only place I have had trouble ...


4

I recently did a trip to the Netherlands (for the first time) to a professional conference and I faced the same dilemma. How much cash to carry? Here is what I found out: I initially thought that I would be hit by a lot of high rate fees on both my debit and credit cards. Then I thought, what if I am stuck somewhere that doesn't accept my card? It turns ...


2

He should carry about as much cash as he normally carries at home. And, with the outrageous 8% fee your bank charges for changing money, he should just get that cash from an ATM in the Netherlands (e.g., at the airport), unless you find that your bank charges an even more outrageous fee for using ATMs abroad.


3

I haven't been to the NL that often yet, but credit cards should work in most places and even if not, debit cards do almost everywhere. However, I strongly suggest to always have around 50 to 100€ per person in cash on you; after all, you never know... Here in Switzerland the EFT system broke down for some hours recently. In such a case it's always good to ...


18

I think you are overreacting to the credit card charges. A 1% transaction fee is small, most credit cards charge 3%. Also, most credit cards give a very fair currency exchange rate. Even if you spend $1000 on the credit card during your trip, that only amounts to an additional $10. Enjoy the trip, take only a small amount of cash, and use the credit card ...


4

This is sometimes possible but only if the two countries have an agreement to do it and, as far as I know, that's not the case for the Netherlands and Italy in the US. Such agreements are getting more common but very often it's between neighbouring countries (e.g. the Benelux, Nordic countries) and in places where the destination country does not have any ...


6

If I travel to a destination in Europe that is outside the UK (my home base), I take 100 Euro in cash. There's no need for more because ATM's are available. If I go outside the EEA, like to the US or Africa, I take 200 in Sterling and the equivalent of 100 dollars in local currency (like Canadian dollars for example). My rationale is that if more cash is ...


9

'How much to carry' is very personal and individual. Some will buy lots of souvenirs, others will want to splash out on restaurants. Then there's cabs and the like as well. Consider looking into just withdrawing on your ATM card in Europe. Almost all countries there will support it, and depending on your bank fees, it may be a reasonably economical way of ...


3

I live in Eindhoven and you can pay in cash. The bus costs 3,50 euro's, no matter where you get off the bus. The OV-Chipkaart is a much cheaper option. For more information, go to this website. You can use the website www.9292ov.nl to plan your travel using public transport. The site is also available in English and it will show you the costs if you are ...


0

The 'Nationale Strippenkaart' was discontinued in 2011. In Dutch: http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nationale_Strippenkaart You need an OV-Chipkaart, a contactless smart card. In English: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OV-chipkaart I suppose it's possible there are some bus lines that accept cash, but that would be an obscure exception. As the above links ...


0

Unless you feel the need to experience the high speed train, that does not get to full speed on that line anyhow, take the regular train. I would guess you can carry your 25 kg dog in a bag, in which case it is traveling for free on the regular trains. It can walk to the platform, you only have to carry it into the train to fit the rules, and it should sit ...


0

Compared to the UK and the USA dogs are more often accepted but not all the time. In trains they travel for free if they travel in a bag you can carry, so big dogs have to have a 'dog' ticket. All dogs can sit on train seats when there are available as long as the seat is covered before the dog gets on. Sitting under the seat is more appreciated though. You ...



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