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1

There are tour operators that organize ski weekends -- leave friday evening and drive during the night (sleep in touring car), ski on saturday, sleep in apartment or hotel, ski on sunday, drive back the night after (sleep in touring car again). Price usually includes a pass for all ski lifts. I doubt you can beat the price of such trips by organizing it ...


2

Fly to Innsbruck. It is relatively cheap, you can fly from Rotterdam (small airport, so no 2-hour queues) and the ski area is directly north of the city.


0

I can only agree on the above answers. Keep in mind that when you try to learn some Dutch words and address someone in Dutch, it is very likely that you get your answer in English. It is a matter of customs, not being rude or kind doing that. Used to work for a US company where alle the native English people went to Dutch class, where everyone but tweo ...


1

English is de-facto second language in the Netherlands, in the sense, that practically every child 10 years or older is able to communicate in it. One of the reasons for that can be the fact that English movies and TV programs are shown with subs and never dubbed (except programs for small kids). In Amsterdam and other tourist areas chances to get lost ...


4

I am going to make a bit of a controversial claim in this post, but from my experience working with a lot of expats in the Netherlands it can be considered quite true: The amount of Dutch you should learn depends entirely on whether you're from a 'western' country (western Europe, north America, Australia), or one of the countries the Dutch tend to look ...


6

For a long time, Dutch TV-makers had no budget for voice-over translation, which gave many children from the '70s and '80s an early advantage over their counterparts in countries like Germany and Italy. That's still noticeable, although more and more English cartoons have been translated over the past few years. It's still very rare to find TV-shows and ...


3

I'm Dutch. A lot of people speak English but most people have a weird Dutch accent. There are also a lot of words which almost sound the same in both English as in Dutch (bier or beer). But with just English you should be able to make yourself clear to a lot of people. If you speak a bit of Dutch is nice but not required. Dutch is a very tough language to ...


6

In my personal experience, you will be fine with speaking English in Amsterdam. Most people will be able to understand you. However I do suggest you learn some key phrases, not out of necessity but out of respect. I think you will find that people are more willing to help you if they can see you are trying to speak their language then when you just assume ...


12

Not sure about the 90% figure but many people in the Netherlands know at least some English and they are very eager to speak it. Dutch people will often switch to English as soon as they sense you don't understand Dutch and I have never felt any annoyance about that (not a concern for you but even civil servants, the police, etc. will happily help you in ...


19

English is widely spoken in Amsterdam, as well as other cities in the Netherlands, and you will have no problem navigating the city. Personally, I only know a few words of Dutch and I never had a problem in the city. You may want to bring a phrase book to help you with greetings and simple phrases. Dutch people, like any other cultures, appreciate when you ...


3

In the Netherlands, there are different rail cards, some group discounts and special offers but no discount for multiple/return travel. A day return costs exactly the same as a single. Except for international trains like Thalys, available fare do not change over time and reserving a specific seat is not possible so absolutely no reason not to buy single ...


1

Hitchhiking is by far the cheapest option. I have had personal experience hitching across Holland both in and out of Eindhoven and I've never wited much longer than 1 hour maximum for a lift pretty much anywhere in Holland. When hitching my best advice is to always hitch from a petrol station, as that way you can talk to drivers to; A: determine if ...


2

If you don't really like the "grandma" type of bike, and a racing bike seems a bit too expensive for your needs, you can also try to rent a hybrid tour bike. For example, I found one at MacBike. The page lists 15 euros per day for rental (or 18 including insurance). The advantage is that you also do not need special equipment, as shoes, helmet and clothes. ...


3

If there is no exit available to you, you can alway use the 'i' (for information) station next to the gates (shown on the right in the picture). After hitting the blue button, you should get in touch with a person stationed somewhere else, who should be able to help you.


6

70 Euro's per day is indeed ridiculous. It is however not uncommon to demand a large deposit. So could it be that the 70 euro is to cover the deposit? It will be difficult to find a sport bike. The surroundings of Amsterdam are really flat, so you only would need a sport bike if you go for speed. When renting a bike, you could ask a city bike with gears. ...


6

My all-time favourite cycle trip from Amsterdam is one from Amsterdam, through Durgerdam to Marken. I added some images in a related answer. It has it all. Land below sea level, bucolic places like holysloot and the folkloristic Marken. If condition permits you could consider taking the ferry to Volendam and cycle back to Amsterdam from there


3

I have no personal experience with cycling in that area, but I might can recommend to use this tool from a Dutch bikers association. Basically, what you can do, is select a starting point for a round trip, a preferred distance, and some more personal preference, which it will take into account where possible. With a lot of tweaking, I get some example ...



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