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48

It has always been illegal and people have been arrested for smoking it in the open. I always love the faces of the tourists being arrested at Schiphol airport or in front of the Central station in Amsterdam for smoking weed. It is a global misconception that in Amsterdam it is as free as smoking cigarettes on the street. The principle has always been, what ...


37

I just found this gr8 (well, not very great) workaround. . Didn't try it yet, but looks like it may work.


35

I had the same problem after arriving to the UK. There are two basic techniques: Plug the sink, pour the water and wash yourself in this water. I think this was how it was meant to be used when this system was first introduced years ago. You can mix it in any other container as well, depending on your needs. One potential downside to this method is that ...


29

This is in fact a completely legitimate photo. It is from Baarle-Nassau where the borders get really funky. Indeed, the one house you are looking it is just one of many, though it is probably the most famous. The exact address is Loveren 19, Baarle-Nassau 5111, The Netherlands. In a situation similar to that along, say, the India-Bangledeshi border, ...


28

The law making it illegal, for foreigners, DID come in, and still stands. However, due to all the controversy, it's changed now and is up to each city to decide how to apply it. As a result, "coffee shops are OPEN in Amsterdam". For a great read on the reasons behind the law, the effect, and the changes to the tourism industry as a result, have a read of ...


28

In the Netherlands (I live there...), most people tip by just leaving some cash on the table or by rounding up the amount on the bill or credit card slip. Amounts tend to not be steep either, there's no such thing as the "expected 15% tipping" in the US. Literally rounding up the bill to a nice round number is common. Say your bill is for 46 Euro, make it ...


21

English is widely spoken in Amsterdam, as well as other cities in the Netherlands, and you will have no problem navigating the city. Personally, I only know a few words of Dutch and I never had a problem in the city. You may want to bring a phrase book to help you with greetings and simple phrases. Dutch people, like any other cultures, appreciate when you ...


16

The Netherlands certainly doesn't have that many public taps as other countries. Maybe also because the regular tap water is of very good quality. But the recent years more and more taps are placed. Mostly to advertise against bottled water, and help people who use own (recycled) bottles. I know of two websites / apps which have a map of taps: ...


15

The image is from the border between the Dutch municipality Baarle-Nassau and the Belgian municipality Baarle-Hertog. To be more exact, the address of the house is Loveren 19, Baarle-Nassau, Netherlands. If you don't want to go there, you can look it up on Google Streetview :) Although it is not that uncommon that towns or villages are split by country ...


15

There is no such thing as a 'right to roam' (as you might find in Scandinavia) in the Netherlands and camping outside campsites on public ground is not allowed. Having said that, if you get permission from the landowner anything goes. Just ring the bell on the nearest house and ask, they might send you away, they might offer you their guest room or anything ...


15

Not sure about the 90% figure but many people in the Netherlands know at least some English and they are very eager to speak it. Dutch people will often switch to English as soon as they sense you don't understand Dutch and I have never felt any annoyance about that (not a concern for you but even civil servants, the police, etc. will happily help you in ...


14

IIRC, you can see some flower fields from the “Oude Lijn” so from trains going between Haarlem and Leiden (which includes some but not all trains between Amsterdam and Rotterdam). The Keukenhof is a park devoted to tulips and other flowers. It's itself located in this tulip growing area (the Bollenstreek or “bulb region”) so if you don't mind the entrance ...


13

I'm currently working in our Eindhoven office and can see the runway from here ;) Hitchhiking is unlikely to work; there's no decent location to get picked up near the airport. The A2 highway is close, yes, but there's no parking lot or something similar. Furthermore, you're not allowed to walk on the highway itself. You'd have to post on the on-ramp, but ...


13

First off, I would use Skype, Google Voice (through GMail outside the US) or any other VOIP-like provider. They offer a tariff of ~2c/min and ~30c/min (mobile) for calling to Italian numbers. Obviously if the other person has Skype, you only pay for the internet connection. Your only problem then would be to get an affordable prepaid mobile data plan unless ...


13

There is a direct train, and it is easy to find from the airport. You don't have to go outside. According to http://www.ns.nl/reisplanner-v2/index.shtml the one way trip will cost you €11.60. And you have two options per hour Travelling by taxi would be significantly more expensive if you take a taxi directly from the airport. I can't predict the exact ...


12

Yes, you can. You should be able to buy a card at the train station or the Albert Heijn supermarket on the airport. The Schiphol has a train station which functions just like any other train station, there is no special 'airport train' like you might find in other places. It's not even an end station, it has trains leaving in two directions. As you can see ...


12

Since you seem to have an interest to camp "in the bush". You might be interested in what is called "paalkamperen". The foresty department provides designated places at remote places where you can camp in the wild. Each of these place come with a water pump. The water is not for consumption, but perfectly fine to wash. A map on the website of the ...


11

If only need a "OV-chipkaart" for the train, you don't actually need one. can just order the train tickets online and print it at home on paper. If you need it for the busses, metro, and tram, you indeed need to charge it. Personally I have a OV-chipkaart which is connected to my train reduction card. For about 50 euros per year, you get 40% discount on ...


11

The fastest way (41 min from station to station, half-hourly on weekdays) is the IC Direct (high-speed train), but you need to buy an additional ticket on top of your regular ticket (€16.80 = 14.50 + 2.30). The normal train connection (60–70 min, 2 trains per half-hour) would cost you less (€14.50). You can look up times and prices and buy tickets on the NS ...


11

As of now it is not yet officially confirmed. Thus far mayor of Amsterdam has not allowed quarter-finals nor semi-finals, as matches with Dutch participation start at 22:00 (10pm) and can end as late as 01:00 (1am), which is too late according to Amsterdam's bureaucrats. So one thing for sure, you will not be able to watch the semi-final on the big screen ...


10

Hurtigruten is a passenger line that sails along the Norwegian coast, and the trip has been described as the "World's Most Beautiful Sea Voyage." It costs from €641 for a 6-day voyage. The disadvantage of this is that you're stuck on a boat. Earlier this year, the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation filmed 134 hours of Hurtigruta and showed it live. Your ...


10

Yes, there are such a trains. The one and only model which doesn't have toilets is NS Sprinter Lighttrain They are replacing original Sprinters, which do have toilets. These are commuter trains, thus generally not intended for long distance travel. They do have some quite long routes (eg. Lelystad—The Hague), however for that kind of distances ...


9

A plane is certainly not the answer, since the two airports (AMS and RTM) are only 45 km apart. I checked Kayak anyway; there are no nonstop flights. Air France will fly you AMS-RTM via London (LCY) for EUR 242 and it takes 3 hours including the layover. So that is neither faster nor cheaper than a train, not by a long shot!


9

According to the online instructions (English or Dutch), you can only pay with iDeal, which is a system for online bank transactions in the Netherlands. From this, I conclude that it is not possible to pay with credit card (this is surprising to me) and thus not without a Dutch bank account. Additional info: online tickets are not cheaper in the ...


9

It is indeed impossible to buy tickets online at the website of the Dutch railways. One exception is maybe the international subdivision HISpeed, but only if your journey involves crossing a border. You could though buy your Dutch railway tickets online at the Belgian Railways. They use the same booking systems, and the online tickets have the same format. ...


8

The cheapest is probably hitch hiking. It's about 120km, and the A2 runs basically the whole way, but I've no idea how easy it would actually be to get picked up. The easiest is probably taking the train. During the day, there are 2 trains an hour from Eindhoven direct to Amsterdam Central, journey time of 1:20. The ticket costs €17.50 for a single in 2nd ...


8

Separate taps are still pretty common in Australia though mixer taps are on the rise. What I usually do is check if the hot water is hot straight away. Usually it's not but I suppose this could depend on how the hot water is set up which may be different in Ireland. If the hot tap is not hot straight away I use the hot tap just on just a bit checking with ...


8

Public transport is comfortable and easy in the Netherlands, and a good way to experience the country. You will need to change several times, which is always a bit of trouble with a baby, but it won't be worse than going through the airports. Do mind how far your destination in Maasbree is from the bus stop — though it might be easier to arrange a bike with ...



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