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21

Usually driving down a steep hill with narrow turns is more dangerous down than up for the simple reason that gravity will accelerate you going downhill. Going up hill gravity slows you down and your engine needs to work to overcome that which usually means that you're not driving fast enough to lose control, although the condition of the road may still ...


17

Pick the side that hugs you closest to the interior. No matter if it zig-zags or has switchbacks, take a look at it and stick to the inside. In Australia, this may mean taking the route that hugs the left side. In Oman, this always meant the route that hugged the right side.


15

Ultimately the mountain road is equally safe either direction. The difference would be your driving skills, those of the other drivers on the road at the same time and the current road surface condition (wet, icy, dry). If you are comfortable and practiced with driving mountain roads, then either direction is about the same. If you are inexperienced, then ...


12

Down is more dangerous. There are three factors contributing to this. When you need to decide on a slowdown in case of potential accident, you basically need to annihilate momentum, and when you are going up, gravity contributes to the total work needed to slow down. When you are going down, gravity works against your intent to slow down, and brakes alone ...


8

The best I can recommend to you is to become a member of the German Alpine Club (Deutscher Alpenverein, DAV) or the Austrian Alpine Club (├ľAV, all links in German). Membership costs varies depending on the "Sektion" you choose to become a member of (you can choose freely and I know many people who choose one purely based on cost) but is in the range of EUR50 ...


7

I think the relative risk depends on the road, the traffic, your skill as a driver, and other conditions. If it's a relatively empty road (very low traffic), then going up is probably safer, as the only risk you're facing is your own inability to navigate the road, versus the downhill risk of burning out your breaks and losing control of the vehicle due to ...


6

I am a terrible driver and can have mishaps at the drop of a hat. For the scenario you have described, I would consult the navigator and attempt to infer the route that has the most traffic. This route would be preferable to me because with lots of traffic one can get 'inside' a group of cars somewhere near the end. This would be my strategy if the road ...


4

Here's a fly through of the mountain track (sometimes known as the tourist route) on youtube. If you watch the brief video or any of the other real life videos of the hike, it should reassure your friends that there is nothing to fear.


4

If you stick to the Mountain track which starts from near the visitor centre you should be fine. There aren't any steep drops(didn't see one when I last climbed in August 2011) per se but there are drops nonetheless. But most of the drops are before the halfway mark. After the halfway mark it is more or less like a zig zag way winding up the mountain.


3

Some parts of the GR10 are indeed reachable by public transport usually involving a combination of train and bus. The railway network takes you to the larger cities which are found at the lowest altitudes near the GR10. From these you'll need a bus/coach to reach higher altitudes. In addition, the bus might drop you several km away from the marked trail so ...


3

Yes - it seems to be possible to rent gear. The local Swiss tourist board website gives a list of a few shops in the area (click on Explore). The first, Wyss Sport in Kleine Scheidegg offers rental of jackets and "shoes" for the trip to the Jungfraujoch - and their shop is near to the start of the Jungfraujoch Railway. There are a few other shops listed in ...


3

Warning: as of June 2016 in the comments here in the post you link to, the route is out of bounds for tourists currently. Do enquire with the guy who entertains the blog as he seems both informed and responsive. Looks like a nice trek. Besides the report that you could find, here is another trip report as of 2007 from Zero Point to Cholamu lake that I came ...


2

I always was told "What goes up must come down" There have been valid points made for both directions.. here's my take on it for WHEN you lose control Losing control while traveling downhill, you can release your brakes and work on regaining control Losing control while traveling uphill, you come to a stop.. at least at first, if the road is REALLY bad, ...


1

It's quite certainly a composite. Building on @MarkMayo's answer I figured tin eye might help and it did. Sadly the original image is a stock image and seems hard to find the origin. From some of the places the picture has been used here it seems likely it is in the Tiroli alps.



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