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21

(Disclaimer: I'm not a doctor, etc) Ebola is not contagious in the same way as, say, influenza outbreaks. It's a horrible contagious disease, but it requires an exchange of bodily fluids for transmission - particularly blood, sweat, sexual fluids, vomit, bile etc. Transmission usually occurs in close proximity - between family members, sexual partners or ...


19

It is perfectly fine. The call to prayer is frequently televised so there is nothing wrong with recording it and posting it on youtube. It is done often. However, do not go to the mosque during prayer and start recording there. Its not that its not allowed, its just that you'll have to have prior permission and you may be a distraction to the congregation.


12

To exit the UK: Use the passport you used to enter the UK. They will probably want to put an exit stamp in your passport and will look for the corresponding entry stamp. To enter Morroco: Use your Morrocco passport. To exit Morocco: Use your Kenyan passport with the UK student Visa with the airlines to prove you're authorized to enter the UK. Show your ...


12

Nobody eats during the daytime until the sun goes down (that's a sure thing), This is true, and Morocco is one of the strictest countries in this regard! Unlike Tunisia, Lebanon or Syria for example. So, no shop (included food shops) are opened until then (with hard temperatures...), and every streets are kind of desert in the afternoon, Not ...


11

Interesting, this came up in the latest podcast from Dr Karl, a science speaker in Australia. What I learned from this is that while Ebola is very, very bad to get (90% death-rate), it has a problem. While colds transmit very easily between people because of the incubation time and infection rate, Ebola's symptoms can appear very early, and visibly ...


10

As far as I know, Morocco is a completely different situation. There were some demonstrations, but no violence to speak of. The Arab Spring is about regime change, overthrowing a dictator. The Moroccan King, according to Moroccans is talked to, is not viewed as a dictator like they have/had in Tunisia, Syria or Libya. In Morocco they have elections, and ...


10

Casablanca in general is safe and the police is visible almost in all areas which makes you even feel safer. Also Morocco is one of the favorite countries for tourists in north Africa (maybe the first one) and it did not get that position if it wasn't safe enough for tourists. Just stick to these simple rules: Don't go out late at night, unless in ...


9

Indeed, you cannot check in your luggage in Marrakech directly to Tel-Aviv. You have to recover it at Paris CDG and check it in again. In theory it could work, but if you want to be on the safe side, spend the night in Paris. There are some not too expensive hotels around (Campanile, Etap, ...). Or look for an alternative routing. There are two bottlenecks ...


8

worldembassyinformation.com has a different opinion: Embassy of Morocco in Tehran, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran Street Address: Av Lavassani- Vatanpour-Shahid, Davoud Barati N°5 Phone: (+98-21) 22206731, 22206732 Fax: (+98-21) 22210169 Email: sifamateh@ocean-net.com Embassy of Iran in Rabat, Rabat, Kingdom of Morocco Street Address: Route De Zair, ...


8

All of the city centres in Morocco's metropolitan cities are basically as safe as any other city. Tangier, for example, has cleaned up its act a lot. Most safety tips are 'generic' non-gender specific, like stay alert when using an ATM or walking on poorly lit streets after dark. A few tips pertinent to women, however, are... Train and bus travel - ...


7

ATMs are easy to find in Morocco. Except for the really small towns, you'll have no problem withdrawing money. Do bring some cash, just in case. Euros are by far the preferred currency. Morocco is after all just 14 kilometers from the Eurozone.


7

You're worrying way too much about this! Morocco sees a huge number of Caucasian European tourists (~370,000 from the UK alone) due to its proximity to Europe thanks to cheap low-cost carrier flights as well as historic ties it has with France, being a former French colony. (To this day, French is one of the more commonly spoken languages, at least in the ...


7

From Wikitravel: Although a predominantly Muslim country, Morocco is not dry. Alcohol is available in restaurants, liquor stores, bars, supermarkets, clubs, hotels and discos. Some Moroccans enjoy a drink although it is disapproved in public places. The local brew of choice carries the highly original name of Casablanca Beer. It is a full flavored lager ...


7

Unlike it's commonly thought, Hosteling International is not a single organisation but rather a group of national associations affiliated to the main body under the same brand name. As such because each national association is a separate organisational entity, and that means how well their inventory of beds is integrated into third-party websites such as ...


7

Usually the problem isn't getting back out of the country, but getting in (there are exceptions to this, such as countries where exit visas are required). According to the Consulate General of the Kingdom of Morocco in New York, citizens of the USA do not need a visa to visit Morocco for a stay up to 90 days. This would allow you to leave the airport during ...


6

Skip Agadir, unless you are extremely exited about tourist traps. Marrakech is very nice, as is Essaouira, although the two are not comparable; Marrakech is a proper city with an old historic city centre, cluster with souks (=markets); Essaouira is a laid back town at the coast, it also has an historic centre, but is much smaller. Accommodation is ...


6

If you travel to the major cities, like Marakech, Fes, Casablanca and Rabat, you will barely notice any change. But in smaller towns, there is a huge impact of Ramadan on the population. Tourists restaurants, cafés and shops will still be open as normal, transportation is available as normal, and all tourits attraction will be open until like 16h00. Only ...


5

Friends have just been, visiting both Marrakech and the coast with their 9 month old. Sure, he won't remember any of it, but the parents had a blast, and were even invited to stay with the family of a local they made friends with, who thought having the kid to stay as well was just brilliant. Everyone benefited from the experience. Of course, a 9 month ...


5

One should not drink tap water in Morocco - it is due to different bacteria. The same applies to mountain springs. You should boil it or treat with tablets before drinking. It may be also advisable to clean your teeth using bottled or treated water to avoid the risk of swallowing.


5

I believe it'd be at 33.1962N, 5.4201W on Google Maps. I found it by following the directions on Wikitravel to Zaouiate Oued Ifrane: Zaouiate Oued Ifrane is located about 100K south of Fez. The road which dead ends at Zaouiate Oued Ifrane turns off from the main roadway after the town of Souk L'Hdd and before the city of Mrirt. Transportation to ...


5

I would not personally travel to Morocco during this time, based on my experience in traveling in Muslim countries (actually during Ramadan, by mistake and more than once). I would be OK with going to Turkey but I would not go to Morocco. First, you're not just traveling during Ramadan, you're traveling on the last week. Which after a month of daytime ...


5

It is not inappropriate to record the calls to prayer. It is, however, considered a sign of disrespect to cut the recording short before the "muezzin" finishes reciting the call to prayer.


5

As with any foreign country with a very different culture from your own: Wear modest clothing (eg. no bare shoulders for women) Don't wear obvious national or religious symbols (eg. a big American flag patch on the back of a jacket would not be a good idea) Avoid alcohol if possible, or consume it in moderation in private (eg. in your own hotel room) Avoid ...


5

To my knowledge, there has never been any Ebola patient in Morocco, ever. Royal Air Maroc serves many destinations in Africa, including Conakry from its hub in Casablanca so it stands to reason that, along with Paris and Brussels, it is slightly more exposed than any random place on earth but at this point this risk is vanishingly small and nothing to worry ...


5

At risk of sounding a bit obvious, Google's first two entries should be the Moroccan consulate in your country, and www.moroccanconsulate.com/Visa_new_form.pdf You should definitely read the associated pages on the Moroccan consulate as regards requirements and restrictions - this will be important. We also have a range of questions here (look in the ...


4

In bigger cities like Marrakech and Casablanca, you find hotel bars which sell alcohol but these places are typically quite expensive from what I found. If you aren't staying at a hotel, you probably don't want to spend that much. Supermarkets still do sell alcohol: in Marrakech, the 'Asima' supermarket in Bab Doukkala does sell alcohol. Expect huge queues ...



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