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8

It's been a while for me since I was in Mongolia, but I'm quite sure that, in this context, 'jeep' still refers to anything that resembles a Jeep. When I was in Mongolia, the most popular 'jeeps', specifically for touring the country, were Russian made UAZ 'jeeps'. They tend to be quite similar to Jeeps. The kind I remember looked quite a bit like this.


5

You need an adapter that looks like this one. The world traveler kit doesn't include such an adapter, it only has the "thin one" (type C), which should fit but it will be loose therefore not recommended.


5

I would say with 99% confidence that it is a road. You don't have to follow the structure for long before you can easily identify intersections with other roads, e.g. here: 41.77533, 105.36238


5

I lived in UB for a year and have visited on and off for the last 10 years. Its VERY easy to meet people in Mongolia. But please note about 50% of the population now lives in UB. That said, in the summer time (very short period!) everyone likes to spend time in the country side. So there is much enjoying, relaxing etc. In my experience traveling around ...


4

I'm from Mongolia. We don't speak Russia. Our 40 or 50 olds may know little Russian language. Currently schools don't teach Russian. So its already forgotton.


4

Yes, Tom is right, you'll get more out of Google. Waka-Waka.com provides an example of such a common use solar panel as you might be a looking for. Most gers though, I found on our trip through central Mongolia, have electricity through solar panels/car batteries, and the locals are really friendly; I can only imagine them being helpful when asked for ...


4

"Jeep" originally referred to a small US Army scout vehicle built by Willys-Overland during WWII. More then 640,000 were produced and they were immensely popular with all Allied armies for their sturdiness, simplicity, and reliability. Since then, "Jeep" has been simultaneously a brand name (of both military and commercial vehicles) that changed hands from ...


4

For all practical purposes, the Mongolian tögrög is a closed currency, meaning you can't buy it outside of Mongolia. I'm not quite certain why this is so, but probably because it seems to be illegal to take more tögrög out of the country than you bring in, so there's no easy way for an overseas bank to gain a supply of tögrög to sell to you. (But don't ...


3

It all depends on what the tours include in the price and how large your group is. That said, I remember clearly that tours booked while outside of Mongolia are typically vastly more expensive than tours booked when in Mongolia. It's been a while, but a decade or so ago I toured the Mongolian countryside for perhaps a good 10 days, in a small group of 5 or ...


3

I've applied for and received a visa at the Mongolian Embassy in Bangkok and found the whole process to be straightforward. The following applied (may 2014): I'm a Dutch citizen. Visa application before 11AM, pick-up 3 work-days later after 4PM. Costs 1705 Bath per visa/person. The application form can be requested via email or received at the application ...


3

It is possible for an English speaker to learn this unique style of singing. The series of photos show a British woman, who is an English speaker, engaging two such singers in an impromptu lesson. Neither speaks the other's language and the instruction is done via body language and imitation. The bottom photo shows the sound being reproduced by ...


3

It simply means that the governments of the two countries haven't arranged this yet. Often visa-free is bilateral - especially when done with a trade deal, but sometimes not. For example, Aussies can get a tourist visa for the UK on arrival, but UK citizens need one (an ETA) in advance to visit Australia! (at least, last I checked). By default, most ...


2

I don't particularly recall from my time in Mongolia, but I say "embrace the local stuff" when I'm travelling, and if I get sick, so be it (it's unlikely anyway). Lost in the Mongolia Grocery Store, however, is a post on some of the foods you might find in a Mongolia supermarket, which is where I assume you'll be shopping if you're after milk "offered to ...


2

Let's start with your first question - Has it been banned in China? A: China has tried to ban them, but some people keep doing it anyway. A year ago, the Chinese government sought again to ban these burials as tourist sites — this is legislative stuff that apparently doesn’t stick. Over the years, there have been gaps in this protection. But now ...


2

If you want a private guided tour (just for yourself and/or a very small group), the price doesn't seem all that unreasonable. Consider the cost of just the fuel alone: Distances in Mongolia are large and you'll be driving for a good chunk of each day, often over rough unpaved roads in vehicles optimized for rough travel and not for gas mileage. Add on top ...


2

In the 17th and 18th centuries, the Kamchatsky Peninsula was settled by Cossack tribes and established a lasting presence there. Not Mongolia, but qualifies as an Asian locale. Source: Google Maps, fair use Their descendants are found there today and constitute a unique ethnic group. Source: Yuri Kozyrev, Far East Russia | Noor, fair use. The ...


1

It's not usually about tone, you could have a six pack and still weigh 120kg, look at a lot of rugby players! And the camel/horse still has to lift it and carry it, no matter what shape you are. It looks like you'll be ok, for the most part, as long as you don't go too far past that 90kg. Some sources: Visit Mongolia cites the max weight for a horse at ...


1

I believe it's common practice at some international borders to leave a stretch of land processed in such a way (e.g. bulldozed/tilled/softened up) as to make it very easy to detect illegal border crossings (i.e. crossing tracks of people or vehicles). This may be at least part of the reason for this structure. Another purpose may be to provide a visual ...



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