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2

FX spreads will be tight in venues where the currency pair has liquidity, and will be wide where the pair is less liquid. As a general rule, currencies are most liquid in their home country and if you are holding MYR and want THB, you will can expect narrow spreads in Malaysia or Thailand, and wider spreads as you move farther away from those venues. The ...


3

I don't think there is a country that everyone would agree as the cheapest (and better) country. There is a nice community-contributed index here: http://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/rankings_by_country.jsp India is the cheapest country per se, but in the northern region, there are some cities that you can spend same, or even more than one would spend in ...


2

Source, moneyfacts Foreign nationals working temporarily in the UK whose lack of banking or credit history excludes them being offered anything more than a basic bank account - national passport, or national identity card (nationals of EEA and Switzerland). From HSBC It can sometimes be difficult to obtain a UK proof of address when you first ...


2

Czech Republic is extremely easy. All you need is your passport and a phone number (to use the online banking) No proof of address or residence status required Debit cards are usually issued within 1 week Both Visa's payWave and Mastercard's PayPass contactless cards are available You can open an account in Euros, Dollars, and pretty much any other ...


3

Nahkon Pathom is not exactly a hotbed of tourism. While a fair number Thai tourists visit, foreign visitors are a small minority. And without foreign tourist traffic, there is not much demand for exchange services. About your only choices will be banks and a few hotels (which you likely have discovered already).


1

The ATMs of pretty much all major banks state that for cash withdrawals from Visa or Mastercard cards, the issuing bank sets the fees. There will be no fee added on top by the bank operating the ATM. So if your card has a 16-digit number, this rule applies. The exception are cards using some system by Visa or Mastercard which does not have a 16 digit number ...


2

As a general rule, the cheapest way to get cash is through the ATM, but the cheapest way to spend money is directly at the point of sale device. You should also withdraw the maximum you need (or are allowed) at each ATM transaction to save on transaction and withdrawal fees. Depending on multiple factors (type of account, type of card, the bank in Germany ...


4

In all cases where the currency does not have a symbol, it is appended with its ISO code; this is also the case where the symbol is not standardized. Wikipedia has a currency symbol entry where you can see various abbreviations used for currencies; note not all are symbols (a single glyph). The general rule is, unless its a symbol it is always post-fixed: ...


2

I work in a bank and from my experience the cheapest way to get cash: ATM (Debit Card) in Canada (best possible rate, unless you are dealing in large amounts). Change USD to CAD in Los Angeles. Change USD to CAD in LAX. (airport rates are higher) Change USD to CAD in Montreal. Change USD to CAD in YUL. (again, airport rates). ATM (Credit Card) in Canada. ...


1

When we went to Prague last year, the travel agent recommended we exchange our Canadian currencies in Canada prior to departure. Once there, we found out that the rates were better in Canada then in Prague. You can pay in Euro in most tourist places while in Prague but you have to be careful as often the waiter/clerk will do the convert in his/her head so ...


5

The best approach: Withdraw money from an ATM. Nothing beats the ATM rates in any country in the world, unless there happens to be a black market for local currency (which doesn't apply to any EU countries). Second best approach: Exchange physical euros. You can find a comparison of exchange rates in Prague on Kurzy.cz ("Čistého Kč" = amount of CZK you ...


1

I am from Czech Republic, and so I can confirm that there is at least one Exchange Point on the Prague main train station. You can ask someone from Czech Railways infocenter for exact information how to find this Exchange. Also anywhere in Czech Republic you should be able to pay directly with Euros, so you do not need any CZK.


2

There are exchange offices on central bus and central train station, both easy to spot. There are many more of them spread throughout the city center. Also, you can easily encounter tourist information spots, where you can get some more directions. It is also probably good to note that some shops near the city center accept euros as currency, but the rates ...


7

Citing from http://wikitravel.org/en/Prague#Money In Prague, especially around tourist sights, there are plenty of Exchange offices with very bad rates which also charge commission. Best rates are found around Main Railway Station (Hlavní nádraží) - exit the station, left across the park, to street "Politických vězňů". There are about 5 offices, mostly ...


4

I don't know about the bus and train stations, but I have seen a lot exchange points in the old town, around the Charles bridge. Finding one of them should be no problem at all. But it doesn't hurt to search for some exchange offices around your hotel or the places you plan to visit. In general banks offer better rates than exchange points, but there could ...


1

The most cost effective method is switching a minimum amount of times. If you're planning on spending more Euros than you currently have in France, it would be most effective to exchange in France. If not, your local bank is the easiest and likely even the cheapest way to to exchange. However, if your money is in a Polish bank account (as asked in the ...


1

This question is too broad. It differs in every country and even within each country. Both the question and some of the answers here seem to presume that techniques that work in one place will also work in another. In Beijing you can bargain very extremely hard without ever causing real offense (or at least I've never noticed it). But cross over to the ...


0

I have successful withdraw US $1000 from KCB ATM at the mall in Nairobi, Kenya.


6

Negotiate to Reach an Agreement The first thing to understand is that the purpose of negotiating is to reach an agreement. It's not about beating someone, but rather you should aim for a mutual victory. Someone is selling you need for a given price, and you wish to pay a different price. If at the end of the negotiation you walk away without that ...


6

Lets get realistic, even if you do whatever other people may say, humans need food and a place to sleep, so absolute free travel is impossible, unless you walk(using your own energy), beg (ask for a lift) or steal (travel without ticket in a train and pretend to have no money to any ticket checking staff, which is highly highly discouraged). Having said, ...


0

I've read a report at russian-language travel forum from a guy, who hitch-hiked through almost all india, so it seems to be the only option you have


5

Wikitravel has a page on Americans in Cuba. Under the 'Buy' section, they go into a lot of detail, but there are a few key points: credit cards will not work. Well, they will .. maybe .. if completely unaffiliated with US companies. US credit cards definitely won't. So don't rely on those or US bank cards. Most travellers carry cash. There is however, a ...


-2

Forget the web sites, forget all the other useless answers here. The only rate you need to be concerned with are the rates at the place where you will actually exchange your cash. All the web sites provide the spot rate on the international FX market. It will not be an accurate reflection of what the rate is "on the street". On top of that, many exchange ...


9

As Mark says, London uses pounds so no need for Euros. However, if you're transiting through a EU destination (such as Amsterdam or Frankfurt) a few Euros may be useful (although you can pay via card). For the base rate I always just use Google, enter "30 dollars in british pounds" etc in the search box (or "30USD in GBP" if you know the currency symbols ...


1

there are a lot of tools for that in the Internet, moreover, most of the official sites of the countries you are visiting usually have a link to them too among a lot of useful information. Anyway, I often use http://currencyconverter.io, you can convert almost any currency, and it is really simple and easy to use. You can also see there how many pounds or ...


8

Well you go to a handy currency conversion website, like XE.com. London doesn't use Euros; while the United Kingdom has joined the European Union, they've decided to keep their currency - the British Pound. So if you're just going to London, all you need is Pounds.


3

In the uk you can usually exchange currencies in most major banks, lloyds, nat west, hsbc, royal bank of Scotland. However from personal experience the rates are not competitive. I have found that travel agents (Thomas Cook, and Thomson/first choice/tui) and marks and spencer department stores with buearax de change in them offer a better rate than the ...



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