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0

I think that you could use a "GeldKarte". You should ask your canteen. In the canteen of my university we can only use a GeldKarte, which is implemented on my university ID. It gets very popular around here in the last few years and is a more or less anonymous way for fast money transfer. The terminal where you have to pay has have this symbol: You can ...


4

According to saint-petersburg.com: Cash over $3000 You are entitled to import/export up to $10000 USD in cash into Russia, but sums over $3000 should be declared at customs. This applies to all foreign currencies and to rubles, with the exact quantities varying slightly from currency to currency. The most important reason for doing this (apart ...


1

The EC cards where rebranded as Girocard a few years back and is only available with a bank account. There are some banks that let (almost) anyone open an account that can only carry a positive balance (as long as you aren't a US citizen or resident). That would take a week or two until you have the card. Usually banks with walk-in branches don't offer free ...


8

You'll find that the major restaurant chains (the ones found in Central Malls) accept Amex, as do many of the department stores and major brands. High end restaurants, bars and clubs, as well as 4*+ hotels are also no problem. Outside of the above then many restaurants accept only visa or master, and even then, they may badger you for cash or a surcharge. ...


3

Swedish stores have no obligation to accept Euro or any other currency besides Swedish krona. The exchange rate at the stores/chains that accepts Euro is far from the best for you as a customer. Your probably best option is to withdraw local currency/pay directly with card (I see other answers already touched upon that). If you want to exchange some cash at ...


5

Not sure about Gothenburg, but I've been in Sweden many many times, so I can comment on the general issue. The local exchange offices in Sweden (I used the ones in Stockholm and Malmö) charge you a huge amount of commission/service fee. That's far above the standards of any country I've ever been to outside Northern Europe. Considering this, I would really ...


9

Although many businesses in Göteborg accept Euros in cash, the most convenient option is just to use your card for everything. Parts of the transport system don't accept cash anyway. It doesn't matter what currency your card holds; it will be converted to SEK when you make a transaction. Important to bear in mind: Although some businesses (mostly in ...


11

You won't be able to withdraw Euros easily. There could be a limited number of special-purpose ATM in larger banks but I have personally never seen one in Sweden and/or Denmark (I have seen some in Switzerland). Regular ATM won't offer Euros. What you should be able to do is withdraw Swedish Krona with your Euro-denominated card (or perhaps even directly ...


0

Spending US dollars outside of a city like Kathmandu or Pokhara will be difficult. And even within those cities, businesses accepting US$ will be limited in numbers (hotels, plus some restaurants and shops). As pretty much all access to Nepal is via flights into Kathmandu, why not exchange US dollars for NP rupees upon arrival? One would think that a few ...


3

I've never walked the WHW, but I have spent plenty of time in rural Scotland, Most stores in Scotland, even in villages, will take credit cards. However most is not all, and you will probably find some that won't. If you are paying for campsites rather than camping wild, or if you are planning on the odd night at a B&B, some will probably only take cash. ...


2

If you're from Germany, I would recommend using a credit card at an ATM (cash machine) in Croatia. Currently, as far as I know, Consorsbank has no fees at all when using the credit card with an ATM, and DKB and ING-DiBa charge only 1.75%, which is still a lot better than exchanging cash. There may be more banks that offer similar rates. What I am pretty ...


2

Following the simple economic principles of supply/demand and cost of transporting currency I'd say your best bet is to exchange your currency in any touristic town or somewhere around Slovenia/Croatia border, but not right on the border, where there is usually only one exchange office. At least that is what I've always done. And yes, you should stick to ...


2

Although BRI seems to have a bigger network than BNI, there seems to be an advantage in using BNI cash machines: they usually (if not always) accept cards belonging to a larger number of card networks. BNI cash points accept: Visa, Visa electron, MasterCard, Cirrus, Maestro, Plus, ATM Bersama, Prima, BNI, Link. BRI cash points usually do not accept cards ...


1

My experience is that Euros are coveted there, so in general, nearly all stores and restaurants eagerly take them except government/official stores, like museums. Public transport (buses/ferries) will not take Euros. Of course, the exchange rate you will get from a store or restaurant will be much worse than what you would get at a cambio or bank.


3

I'd forget about the selling back part, and just buy worthless notes off eBay! (courtesy Banknote World) For example, this seller sells unused notes in bulk from all sorts of obscure countries, including these lovely packs of Mongolian 1, 5, 10 and 50 tugrik notes, with each pack of 100 notes selling for around 6 GBP (plus shipping). Or maybe you'd like ...


4

Bank Rakyat Indonesia (BRI) and Bank Negara Indonesia (BNI) are separate banks. BRI is bigger and has a more widespread ATM network, with over 20,000 compared to BNI's 6,000. There's conflicting information about fees, with at least one claim that BRI has lower fees but a similar forum post stating there are no fees for most Indonesian ATMs.


1

Bank of China just let me convert Renminbi to $500 US. They did not ask where I got the Renminbi, and in particular did not ask me to show withdrawal receipts for it. They set a $500 limit. I did not ask if I could convert more tomorrow. But in 2007 you could even go to another bank the same day and convert another $500. I did that in 2007.


1

In the UK, there are exchange companies that will sell you overseas money with the option to pay a small charge so they will buy it back at the same rate. I therefore get a lot more cash then I would do so otherwise, on the last day of the trip, I count up my cash and get enough out of a local ATM (at a much better rate) so that I can exchange back nearly ...


3

I would call ahead before bringing Euro notes into a random branch on a non-major USA bank. I see Bank of America accepts foreign currency at full-service branches. A small local bank, only at the two largest offices. The USA is an exception to the general rule that you do best to get Country X's currency while in Country X. The rates are bad, and the fees ...


2

Best bet is to close out the German account and then deposit the Euros in your USA account. Most major US banks will accept deposits in Euros. You can exchange them at the Dallas airport, but airport rates are usually pretty poor in the USA. You could buy dollars in Europe, but again buying is never the best rate. You could use the ATM card, but that ...


1

Refer to this official information from Indian customs: http://www.cbec.gov.in/trvler-guide_ason22may2013.pdf Export of Indian Currency is strictly prohibited. However Indian residents when they go abroad are allowed to take with them Indian currency not exceeding Rs. 7,500.


2

I would suggest jewelry, specifically higher quality pieces. They have value both for the materials used, but also for design and/or brand considerations. Exotic metals and jewels may have higher value per weight than "just" plain gold. If there is a proper paper trail (certificate of the manufacturer, invoice proving it is really yours), they should not be ...


5

I would suggest cash. It's more voluminous but lighter than gold and certainly very liquid. In $100 bills (using this as an example because someone did the calculations for me but you could use EUR 500 or CHF 1000 to save some space and have more colorful luggage), it seems perfectly possible to carry $420k (the value of a Good Delivery gold bar) with you. ...


3

Chinese citizens have an yearly limitation on the foreign currencies they can acquire (50,000 USD) but looks like that foreigners are not allowed to acquire foreign currency. Banks are instructed by the State Administration of Foreign Exchange (http://www.safe.gov.cn/) to don't permit tourists to convert from RMB to their foreign currency (but they allow ...


3

As someone who used to deliver pizzas, we never saw any of that delivery charge. I can only speak for the US, but it's customary to tip on the order total. BUT! Tipping on a pizza is a lot different than tipping a server at a restaurant. 15-20% is customary for a server, but they're doing a lot more: taking food orders, delivering food usually, taking ...


1

Yes, it should be possible. I opened a bank account a couple of years ago as a foreigner with just my passport and a certificate of residence (Meldebestätigung). You'll want an online bank probably, so that you can manage your account even when you go back to your country. Most online banks use an identification procedure based on post offices (Postident). ...


9

The answer is a bit more complex... A pizza franchise is actually two separate companies: 1) the store (franchise) owned by some local small businessperson, and 2) the corporation that centralizes advertising and the order-taking and payment process for delivery. When you walk into a pizza place you pay the local business for the local costs. When you order ...


14

You never HAVE to tip for delivery pizza, but if you become known as a non-tipper, the delivery people will be less inclined to treat you well (hot, prompt, etc.). As far as two American chains go, Pizza Hut and Papa John's both charge delivery fees and if you look hard enough on their web sites, those delivery fees do not go to the drivers, at all. ...


4

You never have to tip. But the norm in Ontario is that you do. Since 15% would be just under $3, hand the delivery person a $20 and say "keep the change." Even if the $8 (probably less, I bet there was GST too) is all for delivery, I doubt it all goes to the driver. They make minimum wage and some of them have to use their own cars and gas.



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