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9

Since you mentioned a multi-day hiking trip, my answer will focus on alpine huts. In other locations, most people accept Euros, but the exchange rate is most often quite poor. Also big grocery stores like Migros or Coop take Euros. Most restaurant in the pedestrian area in Vaduz and Schaan also take Euros, but more remotely located restaurant do not always ...


1

From my personal experience, the border guards in the EU region rarely ask for documents other than passport, visa and sometimes insurance. Of course, that also depends on your nationality and the place of origin of your journey. If you are concerned about them asking for confirmed accommodation, simply book a no-deposit, free cancellation hotel on ...


1

Many ATMs in Poland by default offer to exchange PLN into the main currency of your debit/credit card. Almost always the exchange rate they offer is pretty bad, but there is always an option not to use it - i.e. the ATM will charge PLN to your card issuer, who will use their exchange rate (and usually a fee on top of that) to debit your account. In my case ...


1

In case of an American, until very recently it was problematic because of FATCA, however by now all EU countries have signed agreements. So you're in luck. The Dutch bank I'm using, ABN-AMRO, offers services for exapats, as well as for non-residents. ABN AMRO International Clients: your Non-Residents and US-persons Banking Specialist. Please contact us ...


0

The amount of US dollars (cash) you can bring into the USA is set by your airline - usually 23kg per checked bag, 7kg carry-on. If it's all in hundreds that's ..... a lot. You will need to declare to US customs (and most other countries for that matter) if you have cash or cash equivalents (gold, bearer cheques etc.) totalling $10,000 or more. That's the ...


0

If you are travelling as a tourist then follow their guidelines carefully as mentioned on their website http://www.vfs-france.co.in/delhishortstayvisa.html They don't require 3 years of IT return but only 1 year of IT return. What they will see if the amount you have in your bank account. France recognizes that to survive you must have EURO 62 per day. So ...


1

As far as the US is concerned, there is no limit but if have more than USD 10000 with you, you should report it to the US customs. India has strict restrictions on travel with Indian Rupees but not on foreign currency. There is a mandatory declaration as well, see Is it really forbidden to cross the Indian border with Indian rupee?


2

This is of course a question which is probably answerable best by experience, but since I think something is always better than nothing, here's a list of all the currency exchanges (In Spanish) on Benito Juarez Airport. There is also an interactive map on the airport website which shows a list of banks and currency exchanges. They are mostly nearby, so I ...


3

TL;DR: If you have < $1000 - < $2000 worth of money, use a travel card (you can easily get one from Axis Bank) otherwise use a wire transfer for either your Bank Account or from a Forex Service. I happen to have a BoA account as well, so I do this quite often. In India, in order to transfer money to the US, you have three options, Use your local ...


0

If you are still in India, then have your bank wire the funds to your account in the USA. Not sure what all your bank in India might require, but usually it is the SWIFT code for BoA, your account number and perhaps the branch your account was opened at. If you are in the USA already, take your cash to the bank. When I had an account at BoA, they would ...


8

Yes, there are, the common term is perpetual traveller (PT). I've done this myself, living out of a rollaboard suitcase for a year and half, although I wasn't exactly a full-fledged PT since I was notionally both resident and paying taxes in Singapore (not a high-tax country, mind you). Most PTs who are in it for the long haul are either self-supportingly ...



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