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1

If you are actually carrying (including your checked luggage) more than $10,000 Canadian in cash or certain bearer-type instruments, then you should pro-actively declare it. The country you are leaving (and possibly other countries you are traveling through such as the US) may have similar regulations, which would usually be in their own currency, of ...


3

Is this a problem? Will they ask me at the airport how much money I have on me? Can they access my visa application and ask why I didn't bring as much as I promised? No, it's not a problem. Maybe but only to check you don't carry more than 10K in cash which you'd need to report. Access, I believe yes but that's likely to be not relevant. Bring? Noone ...


1

There are two reasons why they asked you this question. One is that they want to be sure that you have enough money for the time that you'll be in Canada and enough to leave as well... Then the second one is that there are some limitations in the amount of money you can travel with. For instance, if you had indicated that you would come with 1 million CAD, ...


3

The black currency market in Argentina is called the "blue market" or "dolar blue" and is a daily changing situation. An answer here will not serve future readers well; but my answer is a little too long for a comment. Today, you can check https://twitter.com/dolarblue for the standard but unofficial USD$ to peso rate, and against which any blue trader will ...


-1

I have experience, but it probably isn't relevant. When I was there in 2014, the official rate was 8pesos/USD, and unofficially 12pesos/USD. So instead of getting ripped off by the ATMs, I took cash and traded it on the black market. It's not as sketchy as it sounds. There's a main street in the capital where people yell "cambio" and you trade dollars ...


0

I'm not sure what exactly are TV seats (it must be new), but if the only thing you see if a place to insert your coins, most likely it accepts only coins as exact change, same goes for dollar bills. Side note: If possible can you post a picture of what it looks like?


1

In fact both, the Custom Department and RBI are correct. Passengers visits for different purposes. So they are entitled to different amount of foreign exchange. Foreign exchange can only be purchased from authorised persons. So there may be any amount. However specifically for tourism only US$ 10000 can be taken in a calendar year.


3

Just got back from three weeks in Colombia. Here are notes based off my travel in Jan 2016. I'll be comparing prices to US dollars. Exchange rate The exchange rate is approximately 1 USD = 3300 COP at the time of this writing. To estimate prices, you're better off just dividing any price you see by 3000 to get a fair estimate of its USD price after any ...


4

In Germany, and many other European countries except for the UK, Maestro is the de facto card-payment method. Many shops do not accept credit cards and if they do, Visa and MasterCard are more widely accepted than AmEx. Now, that does not mean you'll have to pay cash everywhere. Recently (somewhere in 2015) more shops started accepting credit cards. This ...


11

This question is from 2011 and things have improved, even in Germany. As of 2016 you can survive using credit card payments only, but there are still plenty of places that do not accept them. As a rule of thumb a credit card is more likely to be accepted if you are in a metropolitan/touristy area with hotel/supermarket/... chains for larger sums of money ...


0

I have never had trouble with using a USA swipe credit card in any ATM machine in Europe.


3

A core reason is that shops don't like to accept them, so much that they sometimes even 'fake' that they fail (even disconnect the machine and claim it won't work); or give a discount for higher priced articles when asked. The fees to them are high (as in other countries), but in Germany specially, the EC card (just like a debit card) has taken over the ...


3

A few tidbits about Visa Debit cards (from the USA I am guessing). While they work in all USA ATMs, as you discovered they are not always tied to the Plus ATM network so you need to make sure the ATM machine displays the Visa logo. If you have a choice, when outside the USA the card should be treated as a "credit card" not a "debit card" when used for ...


2

They are accepted everywhere. The new notes are a fairly recent introduction and so we still see a good number of older bills, particularly for smaller denominations. In fact, the transition to polymer notes is not even fully adopted. Just last month, the parking machine at the hospital had a note on it saying to see the guard on duty to change them to ...


5

On a recent trip to Germany (Berlin) (December 2015), my Mastercard Debit card (Chip + Pin) was accepted in all large stores (Karstadt, Ullrich, Kaufland), as well as the BVG Mobile App, but notably not in the U-Bahn ticket machines (per https://www.bvg.de/en/Tickets/Other-ways-to-buy/At-ticket-machines, payment is accepted only in cash or with EC card). ...


1

A good idea would be to take the credit card if you will have internet/phone service. If someone steals a prepaid travel card, you've just lost that money. If you lose a credit card, contact the company and have them cancel the card immediately. The only problem is, it will take them a long time to send you a new one(if they'll send to South Africa). So, ...


-1

You need to check with your bank what are the charges they will apply for both a credit card payment and a local cash withdrawal. Some banks don't apply any charge for foreign payments. Others have huge charges so you really need to check with them. From my own experience, a Master Card or an Amex would make it great. Those are also interesting for the ...


1

You're asking a bunch of questions, but, in short: There are plenty of cash machines in Colombia. There is no real need to bring much cash if you've got a card that works. Whether you will be charged for withdrawing money from ATMs depends on your bank and the bank you withdraw money from. To avoid paying a 'convenience fee', typically, don't use ATMs ...


13

The Bank of Canada addresses this in their FAQ on the new polymer notes: All notes issued by the Bank of Canada since 1935 have legal tender status and retain their full value. If you don't know how to check notes from past series, exchange them for newer ones at your local bank. You should have no trouble spending them, though if you just want to be ...


0

You need to ask your bank; they are the ones that have the final say - and they may also be able to tell you which ATMs to use. As there is very little in difference between GBP and USD - your only challenge will be to find an ATM that isn't restricted by the ATM operator on foreign cards. If you were traveling to a country where the exchange rate is ...


1

Most taxis and almost all big restaurants take credit-cards, and all ATMs take foreign debit-cards. I spend less than 10,000 INR a week in cash when I go to India.


2

Limits are set both by your bank, which imposes per-day and per-withdrawal limits, and by the machine, which imposes a per-withdrawal limit but will allow you to make as many individual withdrawals -- for an additional fee of course -- as you like. Many independently owned ATMs have $200 limits, which is ridiculous if you ask me, but the limit on most ...


0

You're generally limited by your bank's or credit card issuer's limitation on the daily withdrawal of cash from the ATM. Depending on the type of account you have and the amount of money you have in it that amount may vary. I've known some people who have had business accounts that allowed them to withdraw $1500 daily, and I've seen them getting that much ...


0

I would advice carrying some small of indian money say upto 7000 Rupees which is not a problem, just in case you need some urgency before finding an exchange, but there should be exchanges in the airport. And generally if you are living in and around Delhi,its shouldn't be problem to pay with your creditcards for dinners i mean in good hotels,but not Taxis ...


7

You probably won't be able to take rupees - currency controls, at least on paper, prohibit non-residents bringing rupees into India, which means it's also difficult to change local currency into rupees outside of India. (See also this question.) I would strongly recommend converting to rupees rather than trying to use dollars. You are unlikely to have any ...



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