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12

No. It's merely a reporting requirement, as an anti-money-laundering / drug-trade provision. You will be asked where and how you obtained the money. The country you are traveling to will likely also ask you to declare the cash, and may ask questions about it.


4

Indonesian ATMs generally won't let you withdraw more than 25 banknotes at a time. Since the largest denomination is only Rp. 100,000, this means 25 x 100k = 2.5 million. See eg. the Bank Mandiri FAQ. It's worth remembering that there are parts of Indonesia where the legal minimum wage barely crosses 1 million per month, not to mention all the people in ...


4

You will not have problems to find ATMs in China, the only problem is if your bank card can be used inside ATMs of a specific chinese bank (like Merchants Bank, ICBC, Bank of China). For example I can use my debit card only at ICBC and Bank of China ATMs, it's not accepted in other banks (also if they display the logo of my debit card)


3

I have noticed that Travelex has advised... “No one can know for sure what will happen, however we want to ensure our customers are prepared for all possible scenarios and make contingency plans before they travel. As always, we recommend travellers take a combination of cards and cash. To avoid running out of cash, if there are shortages or ...


2

When you carry cash with you on an airline trip, you should take some very basic steps to keep from becoming a victim of theft, or from losing your money by accident. 1.Avoid traveling with large amounts of cash. 2.If you have to take cash, keep it in a carry on bag. 3.Never put your cash, financial instruments, or precious metals in a checked bag. ...


2

You can bring Dollars or Euros with you while visiting South Korea. You can also use master card in shopping in South Korea.


4

Bring whatever suits you best. If you live in the Euro area there is no point in converting Euros into Dollars to convert them later into Won. You will loose twice from the exchange. Euros can as easily be exchanged into Wons as Dollars can be. Buying Won in Europe can be cumbersome and is not worth the effort. Credit cards (MasterCard and Visa) are also ...


0

Yes there are no restriction of holding cash and declare it when traveling in EU countries but I think carrying such a big money during traveling without safety is not a good idea.


6

There's at least two separate facets to consider here. Legally, you're in the clear. Restrictions covering traveling within the EU and travel to/from from the EU only require you to declare amounts exceeding EUR 10,000. Norway, however, being outside the EU, requires you to declare amounts over NOK 25,000 (~EUR 2,800 at time of writing) or face a 20% ...


1

Assuming that you want to hit up only major tourist destinations, it's likely that you could get by with only your credit card and a few thousand HuF. But if you want to go to any truly local bars, restaurants, shops, etc., you'll want a decent amount of HuF, especially outside of Budapest.


3

It might be possible to use only Euro, but as the others have already pointed out, the conversion rate is not very favourable. In the last year, new ticket vending machines have been installed in Budapest, which accept credit cards, but obviously not Euro banknotes so at least for public transport you will need either HUF or a credit card. So if you don't ...


1

It is usually preferred to pay with Forints in Hungary, as even in cases where the stores accept Euros they will do it with a sub-par exchange rates, and also give the change back in Forints anyway. Most high street exchange booths (especially in tourist areas - airports and train stations) will also operate with very high margins, so you should avoid them ...


4

Many large shops accept EUR in Hungary, but they offer a terrible exchange rate. You're better off if you do currency exchange in one of the dedicated booths or offices. Most small shops don't accept EUR. Depending on your home bank and your debit (not credit!) card, withdrawing HUF from an ATM can give you a good rate. Please make sure that your home bank ...


17

I did not visit Budapest, but spent some time in Hungary last year. My experience was that even if a few shops accept euros (especially larger shops in areas with many tourists), they tend to give you very unfavourable exchange rates. When hotels annouced their prices in forint and euro, in some cases, it even appeared to be two completely different ...


-2

Note - you need a chip. As many have mentioned, card machines and ATMs in europe - I think - mostly (all?) need the modern chip-type card. You need one, so get one. "Can I get by In Paris and Rome by carrying very little cash and using the credit card for every little souvenir, tour and food purchase? Or should I prefer paying in cash for both Paris and ...


1

As SpaceDog commented, even in the UK they are not universally recognised. The only consistently accepted British notes worldwide are from the Bank of England. So either keep them for your next visit, or do a deal with a friend who is going to visit. This is actually what I do with most notes that aren't Euros or US Dollars, as outside the US and Europe I ...


3

To my knowledge, no major bank in China takes Scottish Pounds. However, there are some private companies' posts online saying that they would exchange Scottish Pounds for CNY. For example, this one: http://www.xici.net/d199868781.htm (If you could read Chinese). Even if such company is reliable, I don't think they would offer a reasonable rate for you. So ...


4

In France, cards are widely accepted anywhere (and not more in Paris than in rural areas), but in small shops there's often a limit on the amount. In Paris the card is generally refused for anything less than 15€, sometimes 20€ but that's in extreme cases. In rural areas, the limit is more often around 10€. I live in France, and I almost never carry more ...


5

I just got back from a 2 week vacation in Venice, Rome, Amalfi Coast, and Paris on Monday. First, note that Espressos/Coffee/Pastries, are generally pretty inexpensive in Italy at about 0,50€ - 1,50€. We never even tried paying for something that cheap with a credit card, and I don't think you should either. We used a couple personal drivers, and they all ...


5

Be aware that many places in France will not take a credit card if it doesn't have a chip on it. These cards are not that common in the US, but are in Europe. I was able to just call AmEx and get a new card that has a chip, and I believe many US banks will now issue them if you ask.


0

Are you coming from the US? Is your vacation date at least a few months in the future? If so, you might be able to save a little money by buying your euros now, or dollar-cost averaging them between now and the time you depart. The exchange rate is pretty favorable right now. It hasn't been this good in about ten years. If you do this, you'll be paying ...


6

Traveling to France (mostly Paris) and Italy (Rome, Venice, Sorrento) I mostly pay my day-to-day expenses (local transport, lunch, souvenirs...) with cash. Bigger expenses (mostly restaurants) with my Credit card. I usually keep 60 to 100 euro with me all the time; I keep 20-ish euro in my front pocket and the rest in the wallet in my back pocket (not ...


1

Always have some cash on hand, enough to pay for the restaurant if they don't accept your cards or any cards at all. Spread the money among people in your travel group. Warn your bank so they don't block your cards and bring two different cards if you have them (some circuits like american express aren't accepted everywhere, mastercard or visa are very ...


10

In France you can almost always pay with a credit card but for small amounts (say up to €10,) cash is often preferred. In Paris cards are a little more often accepted than in small towns off the tourist track. I have not been in Italy, so not in Rome, but I have heard the same for there. Get some cash and use your card for the bigger payments. If you are ...


0

I am in a small village in Germany right now and my Spanish Debit card (MC) only works to get money from the bank and in some major restaurants. No supermarkets or small bars accept it.


3

So this has been an issue for quite a while. Fortunately here is a local who withdraws USDs from local ATM every week. FYI I use a Bank of America ATM KCB University way ATM @ Anniversary towers (1 machine) KCB Kipande House ATM (1 machine) KCB Kencom ATM (2 machines) Bienividos Kenya!



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