New answers tagged

0

I think it is unlikely (if not impossible) that you will be able to use the lost card to pay for your room. Most U.S. hotel/motel stays are post-paid. As such, you will customarily be asked for a payment method up to three times— at booking, at check-in, and at check-out— but you would only be charged at check-out or for a no-show. Usually, they ask me to ...


1

If you have a Bank of America ATM card you can use Westpac ATMs in Australia and New Zeeland for free. There is still foreign exchange fee, but it's a lot less than any alternative. Check with our US bank about Australian partner banks.


2

Not having a bank account isn't an issue while you are in Europe. However, assuming you are a Pakistani national, you will need to apply for a visa, which will include providing your financial details. Not having a bank account may be a red flag in the visa process. While you are in Europe your problem will be be not having a credit card. Having a credit ...


2

It looks like the answer is no. The informative paragraph: If you are a non-resident visitor to Canada, you cannot claim a rebate of the goods and services tax/harmonized sales tax (GST/HST) that you paid for all purchases made in Canada. The visitor rebate program for GST/HST was replaced on April 1, 2007, with the Foreign Convention and Tour ...


2

If you're taking money from a country with deflation then you're doing a microscopic piece of harm to the country by removing money from circulation. In a country with hyperinflation you're doing them a very small favour.


4

The question of ethics is generally centered around conflict of interest. An ethical conflict of interest exists when you have an opportunity to do something that will benefit you personally, but will cause problems for a different obligation that exists for you in this context. (For example, a stockbroker who recommends a stock that will earn him a nice ...


3

Seigniorage,the difference between the value of money and the cost to produce and distribute it, is usually positive. In the US for example: ╔═════════╦══════╦═════════════╗ ║ Coin ║ Cost ║ Seigniorage ║ ╠═════════╬══════╬═════════════╣ ║ cent ║ 1.7 ║ -0.7 ║ ║ nickel ║ 8 ║ -3 ║ ║ dime ║ 3.9 ║ 6.1 ║ ║ ...


3

I once visited a country (I forget which, but it was Spanish-speaking) where there was a shortage of coins for reasons I don't recall. There were signs in many places asking people not to hoard their coins. Of course, that induced me to hoard coins for the duration of our trip. But I made sure to spend most of them before we left, with only a small few for ...


2

By asking "is it ethical", I hope you realize that answers will be primarily opinion-based, so here's a counter opinion: Some nations (like China, last time I was there) have laws prohibiting removal of currency from their borders. So, if you knowingly and deliberately removed currency from one of these nations, I'd say that it is, in fact, unethical. Of ...


24

There is nothing unethical about keeping your own money. The money you earn is your to spend as you see fit (other than what your government demands you give them in taxes ;-). Lots of travelers keep their leftover coins and currency as souvenirs, as you mentioned, it brings back fond memories. Lots of travelers bag up their leftover currency and coins to ...


49

I don't personally think there are any ethical issues with taking change away. One good reason for doing so is to land with a little change next time you visit; I find it quite handy to have a couple of quarters in my pocket when I land in the US, just in case I need to make a small purchase from a vending machine, or a call from a payphone. Visitors to ...


-1

The best option is to sell them to someone else that is going to Japan, or use them if you got any fiends that want you to buy them rice cookers.


0

Currency exchanges do not seem to deal in foreign coins, at least here in New Zealand (I've exchanged US dollars and Japanese yen, personally). The exchange rate will also differ depending on exactly what exchange you use. If you're trying to maximize the amount of NZD that you receive, definitely check the exchange rates offered by various currency ...


3

In a lot of countries it's possible to ask your regular bank that has your bank account to procure currency for you. The exchange rate is usually pretty fair, compared to a tourist money exchange. This process often takes a day or too. Since you worked in Japan, you probably have a local bank account. I would suggest to talk to them, tell them how much ...


18

The usual rule of thumb is you get a better rate at the destination, but it never hurts to check beforehand. Look online for the "sell" rate of NZ Dollars from a Japanese bank and the "buy" rate for Japanese Yen at a NZ bank. Then do the math. If you choose Japan, the exchange service may not have small denomination NZ currency and definitely no coins, so ...


0

Some airlines (Qatar, for example) provide a form for payment verification, if the credit card holder is not traveling with the passenger. One needs to upload the monthly invoice from the credit card company to prove that he owns the card/has access to the invoices which are generally accessible only by the owner. Another alternative that I found online ...


1

As simple as it sounds, book a ticket which doesn't require FOP verification. For example, here's a reseller which doesn't require you to present the credit card for verification at the airport (and even accepts virtual cards). You may even book the ticket with an actual virtual credit card to be sure.


9

Airlines in Europe usually ask for your payment card at the airport if and only if the cardholder is travelling. I routinely book flights for my parents (directly via the airlines' webpages, never via reseller) and so far there has always been an option to indicate whether the cardholder was travelling or not. Note that some airlines (Lufthansa if I remember ...


2

My experience with Belgian Banks whilst trying to get an account for an Italian: Despite a banking union thas has been in vigor since years, you have to apply for specific non-residents services. When I looked for an account for an Italian, ING was the only one to offer these services. More info I would thus recommend contacting ING's non-resident service ...


20

If you are worried about showing payment, you can eliminate this by going to a travel agent and have them book the flight. That automatically verifies FOP for the ticket. You can also visit the airline's office and do the same if they serve your home town. But be sure to talk to your friend by phone BEFORE doing anything. They can call you collect. The ...


15

he might not be able to board the plane if he doesn't have the original form of payment. I read the linked answer and it does not mesh with my experience after hundreds of flights I took in Europe, the USA, Canada and in between. Consider people flying on the dime of some company. The passenger certainly won't have the card for that. Even in the case ...


1

The regulations were changed in January 2015 to allow any persons other than from Pakistan and Bangladesh to bring in or take out upto 25,000 Rs, even if not resident of india. See: http://www.cbec.gov.in/resources//htdocs-cbec/customs/cs-circulars/cs-circulars-2015/circ03-2015cs.pdf


4

As much as you'd like. But, if it's a real lot, you might need to declare it. When leaving Hungary amounts exceeding EUR 10,000.- or more or the equivalent in another currency (incl. banker's draft and cheques of any kind) must be declared. When arriving to India amounts exceeding USD 5,000.- (or equivalent) in cash, or USD 10,000.- (or ...


1

WHO MUST FILE: (1) Each person who physically transports, mails, or ships, or causes to be physically transported, mailed, or shipped currency or other monetary instruments in an aggregate amount exceeding $10,000 at one time from the United States to any place outside the United States or into the United States from any place outside the United ...


2

If you send the money by a bank wire to your son, then the banks will file the proper notification paperwork at both ends. If you carry it into the country in cash, then you need to declare that fact and fill out FinCEN Form 105 for your trip, as you have noted. But you are not "importing" it rather you are "carrying" it in. - ...


1

Travelling in the United States with such a huge amount of cash is extremely dangerous because civil forfeiture. Your money can be taken at the airport, by the security at the airport a routine traffic stop and practically anywhere else. Once the cops seize the cash they will not charge you (often they won't have anything to charge you with) but the money ...


5

The form instructions state that the declaration only needs to be made once. You don't need to do it twice. An additional report of a particular transportation, mailing, or shipping of currency or the monetary instruments is not required if a complete and truthful report has already been filed. Your son does not need to file a report anyway, since he ...



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