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11

Assuming a maximum luggage allowance of 20kg, and that the weight of 1m EUR is about 2kg. Then we are talking about 10 million Euros. :D Of course that is assuming that you are too poor to pay for extra allowance.


7

Apart of regulations mentioned by drat, EU also has anti-money laundering laws. They apply regardless if you travel internationally or not. The EU directive 2005/60/EC "on the prevention of the use of the financial system for the purpose of money laundering and terrorist financing" tries to prevent such crime by requiring banks, real estate agents ...


13

There seems to be no limit as such. However if you carry more than 10'000 €, you might have to declare it depending on the country. For example in Germany, you are to declare it when orally asked to do so. For the UK on the other hand, there seems to be no need to do so. So if you consider taking more than 10'000 €, you should check the rules for the ...


3

You have to shop around. Royal Bank had the best rate last time I had to change a relatively large amount and wire transfer it, most of the other banks were clustered together, and significantly worse. The actual amount charged on top of the interbank rate should be around 2-3%, not 5.5%. The spread (buy-sell) might be 5.5, because you're looking at two ...


10

What you are talking about is this 100/50 USD bill: I have had this problem many times. If you end up with old USD bills older that series 2003-6 then it won't be accepted by most countries and money changers outside the United States. More frequently the problem I have noticed is with the bills with the front face photo to be smaller than the current ...


1

I didn't know these fraud protection measures existed within the US, but they are not uncommon in Europe. They even became more strict recently. In general I am quite happy with this protection. Only three years ago, my bank called me if it is possible that I withdrew money from Brussels and Chicago on the same day. I guess this happened on a regular base ...


5

I live between Japan and the US, and travel regularly in Europe and SE Asia. My American bank issued credit cards regularly get blocked for suspected fraud (I should not that two cards have actually been defrauded before). My solution is to have three credit cards and two debit/check cards spread across two banks so that I always have a backup, and also its ...


5

When it comes down to it, it's often a people problem rather than a system problem. Someone could accidentally write down the note and forget to press the button, or mis-read a flag on your account. With HSBC in the UK, I travelled to all sorts of countries without notifying them, and despite their 'security', never got flagged or blocked. South Africa, ...


3

Try calling them when you're at the ATM.. they have some very tetchy fraud protection algorithms these days.. We found my traveling companion's card rejected due to some weird issue but they were able reset the flag on her account with a fairly brief phone call. Based on your experience though, a backup method of getting cash would seem to be in order.


3

The second source is not correct. Traveler cheque specially "Iran cheque" is widely used by people. "Iran cheque" is same as cash money but with larger amounts and is accepted in any shop or any bank exactly same as cash money. Also people mostly use both the cash and the different national banks cards for payments in shops. Perhaps this site can help ...


1

as DumbCoder said Taveller's Cheques are a good option, you are insured against theft. regarding credit card expenses they can go grom 2 to 7 percent and as said on Independent Tavaler and WikiHow one of the best way to be overwhelmed by exchange rate would be to use your credit/debit card since you won't be charged with ATM fees. Personally when I went to ...


4

The visas used to be 15€ or 20$, and paying in Turkish liras was not an option. There was an ATM right next to the visa booth. However, as of the 10th of April this year, visas are now applied- and paid for online at https://www.evisa.gov.tr/en/. EU citizens can get the visa at electronic booths in the airport, but getting it online prior to arrival is ...


2

Ah, MUFJ, that mutant offspring of semi-insolvent Japanese banks. You're in for some fun times! The sanest way to approach this is to go to the bank branch and ask, they'll rustle up somebody with enough English to help you out. The Japanese keyword is 外国送金 (gaikokusōkin). A few pointers: Not all branches handle remittances, so pick a nice big branch ...


0

It would be wise to obtain MAD from an ATM after your arrive. Using your bank card at a local ATM will get the best exchange rates, minus a small fee. Some banks will refund this fee to you, so check the terms on your account. To find an ATM, check whether your card is part of the PLUS (Visa) network or the Cirrus (MasterCard) network. If it's part of either ...



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