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43

There is no requirement to have €10,000 when you are in Europe. It sounds like someone is confusing two things: The requirement to have enough money to support yourself for the duration of your trip. This amount varies according to the duration of your trip, and according to the kinds of things you plan to do. The requirement to report cash if you are ...


18

Some strategies: Take less out of the ATM. It may dispense different denominations and give you smaller notes if you only ask for a little money. This, of course, may backfire on you if you have to pay an ATM fee, since the fixed fee will add up to a higher percentage of the money taken out. But if you have a free ATM (or one where only a percentage-based ...


13

When you apply for a Schengen visa, the officials will try to admit genuine tourist or business travellers and refuse entry to illegal immigrants. They want to know if you intend to leave again after your visit, or if you intend to overstay and work without paying taxes. They can't know that for sure, so they are looking at the premise of your visit and your ...


7

Short answer: I don't think it is true. Reason: When I arrived in Amsterdam October 2014, no one asked me how much money I had. (It was about a hundred euro.) Spain, May 2015 and April 2016, no one asked. Wales, June 2015, they asked if I were capable of supporting myself but didn't ask what I had. Iceland, July 2015, no one asked. When I get low, I ...


5

Botswana is open for tourists, you can visit with a valid passport up to 90 days total within a calendar year. Notice that leaving the country and coming back does not renew the 90 days period. There is no need for for sufficient funds proof as far as I experienced, for myself or for visitors. Valid passport (Botswana and South Africa) must have: At ...


4

In Japan, Japan Post Bank ATMs give 1,000 and 10,000 yen bills only. You can request arbitrary amounts of each, and the bills to be dispensed are displayed for confirmation before the transaction is complete. The easiest way to request 1,000 yen bills when withdrawing an amount which is a multiple of 10,000 is to use the 千 (1,000) button instead of or in ...


4

Small shops are usually reluctant to take large notes at the beginning of the day, because they start with a limited amount of cash to make the change. Once they've had a few customers, they usually have enough money in the cash register to accommodate you. So, if you have troubles paying a shop with a large note, you should simply try again later, ...


4

Some ATM's in Western Europe ask you what denomination you prefer. If that is not the case, I usually try to do some mental arithmetic and withdraw an amount which cannot easily be factored by whatever large denominations exist in the foreign country. Say, for example, you are in the Euro Zone and want to avoid €50 notes. You can withdraw an amount that ...


3

Yes, it is okay to have less than €10,000 when visiting Europe, to a point. In the Schengen Area, you must have an a means of substinence - however the amounts vary between countries, lengths of stay and age. A full list can be found here. However, there is also a maximum amount you can bring into the EU undeclared, which is €10,000. Any more than that and ...


3

You don't need any cash for a vacation, I went to EU 4 times this year and only once did I have any Euros on me when I entered. You might be confusing the requirement to prove that you have enough to support yourself for one year if you are moving to the EU on a work or study visa. For example, when applying for a study permit in Canada you need to show ...


3

Ask to speak with the manager, show your receipt, ask them to check the cameras, most likely the credit is still in their computer system.


2

Not having a bank account isn't an issue while you are in Europe. However, assuming you are a Pakistani national, you will need to apply for a visa, which will include providing your financial details. Not having a bank account may be a red flag in the visa process. While you are in Europe your problem will be be not having a credit card. Having a credit ...


2

It looks like the answer is no. The informative paragraph: If you are a non-resident visitor to Canada, you cannot claim a rebate of the goods and services tax/harmonized sales tax (GST/HST) that you paid for all purchases made in Canada. The visitor rebate program for GST/HST was replaced on April 1, 2007, with the Foreign Convention and Tour ...


2

In Vancouver: yes. However, currently this is a very bad deal because the cabbie will offer a 1:1 exchange rate so you are paying 20% more. Source: personal experience.


1

I try to pay for each purchase using only the next larger denomination. That what I end up with plenty of change. Paying for a 1200 rupee hotel? Use 2x 1000 rupee notes. Paying for a 120 rupee taxi? Use a 500 rupee note. Paying for a 15 rupee bottle of water? Use a 20 rupee note.


1

I think it is unlikely (if not impossible) that you will be able to use the lost card to pay for your room. Most U.S. hotel/motel stays are post-paid. As such, you will customarily be asked for a payment method up to three times— at booking, at check-in, and at check-out— but you would only be charged at check-out or for a no-show. Usually, they ask me to ...


1

If you have a Bank of America ATM card you can use Westpac ATMs in Australia and New Zeeland for free. There is still foreign exchange fee, but it's a lot less than any alternative. Check with our US bank about Australian partner banks.



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