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30

You have the right to ask for a Canadian passport that does not show your place of birth. This implies that having it in your passport may cause problems in some cases. The disclaimers on that page further suggest that not having it in your passport may cause problems, too. To quote from their info page: You may request that your place of birth does not ...


21

I am from Lebanon, you could visit Israel using a Canadian or a Lebanese passort, Israel will let you in. Many priests and nuns visit Israel each year. In fact, our Lebanese Maronite Patriarch Cardinal Mar Bechara Boutros al‑Rahi will go to Israel to welcome the pope. But there's a catch. You cannot come back to Lebanon, well technically you could, but you ...


17

Technically, I don't believe that the US has a list of countries that would automatically disqualify you from entry if you have visited them. However, immigration officers have a large degree of discretion when it comes to denying entry to non-citizens. If you are unfortunate enough to run into an ignorant, prejudiced, or suspicious agent at the border, ...


16

In most Muslim countries, keeping the arms and legs (and of course the cleavage) covered would be considered completely sufficient, especially for someone who is visibly a foreigner. Some (e.g. Turkey, at least the bigger cities) are much more tolerant and nobody will feel offended by bare arms or legs. The strictest dress code exists in Saudi Arabia, ...


15

There is no list published by the US government as mentioned in the other answer, but I know people who were refused US visas in different US embassies/consulates because they have visited one or more of these countries: Iran Syria Pakistan Sudan Bahrain The list could be longer, and visiting one of these countries doesn't mean you will be refused but ...


14

Regarding Turkey, Egypt and Jordan: The three countries have diplomatic relations and peace treaties with Israel. From personal experience you can enter Turkey with an Israeli passport, and from people I personally know, the same goes for Egypt and Jordan. So an Israeli stamp in the passport isn't a problem. Regarding Malaysia, which doesn't have ...


13

Are all countries between the "near east" and the "far east" then "middle eastern" countries? I always thought Middle East and Near East are mostly synonyms. (For me, this is probably influenced by the fact that the Finnish word for Middle East is Lähi-itä, literally Near East.) Even if we stick to English terms, Wikipedia tends to agree (emphasis ...


12

You can cross the Turkey-Iraq border at Silopi-Zakho and travel throughout Kurdish Iraq without any problems. In the past (before 2008), the border was a bit more difficult as the Turks and Iraqi border guards were much more suspicious of non-locals crossing, but now they don't even look twice. You'll get a 10-day visa on arrival at the border although it ...


11

Definitely not in Jordan, except in places like a mosque where you may want to show some respect but it would be enough to put a light foulard on your head. However, other countries may be more strict about this.


10

You will need a visa for Turkey, but the other countries you have listed (Greece, Cyprus, Italy and Malta) do not require visas from American citizens. Also remember that Crete is part of Greece, although I don't see it on your map, so perhaps this isn't relevant. A Turkish visa is issued at the border to US passport holders and is good for 3 months of ...


10

Chris Guillebeau, author of The Art of Non-Conformity blog, has an article on how he managed to get there.


9

I entertained the idea to spend some time in Dubai as well, considering I have to change planes there anyway. I talked to a friend last week who lived for several years in Al Ain, a city in the UAE on the Omanian border. It seems the UAE are okay for travelling by yourself, but a city like Al Ain with a population of over 370,000 and a possible gateway ...


9

Sorry for answering my own question, but it looks like all flights currently go through larger Yemeni cities, and traveling by boat is likely to be just as dangerous due to Somali pirates. From the Australian Government's Travel Advisories for Yemen: There is a high risk of piracy in the coastal areas of Yemen. There have been attacks by pirates against ...


8

These photos were taken in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The last photo shows the Alfaysaliya building.


7

It is possible to go to Iraq. Business people travel there regularly, although they normally travel with security. There's a pretty good summary of the area here. Kurdistan seems to be one of the more stable areas, and the border with Iran seems to be pretty scary. I would be afraid to travel in Iraq, but then I'm also afraid to go to Colombia, which is ...


7

This is a more general answer, as I don't have any knowledge of what is the protocol for Lebanon born citizens of non enemy countries is. Palestinian born citizens of other countries, and even people whose parents are Palestinian citizens (but they are not) will have trouble entering Israel. As depicted in this story, as well as on the site of the U.S ...


7

Middle East is a geographical area east of the Mediterranean sea and west of India. Sometimes the "stans" are included (Afghanistan and Pakistan) but more often they're not because when the term was originally coined they were part of British India. As mentioned in the comments, North African countries are considered "Middle East" in some cases, because ...


7

It depends on the country. On the flight to Tehran, the crew members reminded female passengers that headscarves are required attire in public, and that all women should put on a headscarf now, before the aircraft lands.


6

If you are a foreigner then it is ok, you can show them or hide them no one will actually care. It is not something common there for middle easterners to have but people do not judge foreigners for having or showing them. Regarding Egypt in particular, it is common for criminals and people who been prisoned to have them, so that will be the first ...


6

Israel's immigration allows you to stamp in a piece of paper ( outside the passport ), so if you want to travel to other Arabian countries, their immigration will not get the Israel's immigration stamp in your passport. Check this blog about Israel's Passport Stamping Policy. I never heard any problem entering Israel after visiting Bali / Malaysia.


6

Yes, There are: Oman: Chinese, Russian and Ukrainian nationals may obtain visit visas following the same procedures provided that they are part of tourists groups arriving to the Sultanate through a local tourist agent or a hotel or as a family. In the case of groups, the number of females must not exceed the number of males. Source: wikitravel.org Saudi ...


6

One option you could consider is the Siwa Oasis. It's an isolated oasis situated in the Western Desert region of Egypt, approximately 550 km west of the capital Cairo, 305 km south-west of Marsa Matruh and some 50 km from the border with Libya. Extending some 80 km in length and 20 km in width, the oasis is one of the most isolated settlements in the ...


5

Just came across this question. If you fly into Qatar, it is land locked with Saudi Arabia. The only way to get into Saudi Arabia is with a transit visa. I lived in Qatar so I had a residents permit which made the transit visa easier to obtain. You do this through local agencies, I got my first one at the Saudi Arabian embassy after 7 trips but now they've ...


5

As a practical and comforting example, I had been to Lebanon, Qatar, Oman and Jordan and maybe some other "questionable" countries (such as Yemen that is mentioned in another answer, but not including Iran from your list) before visiting the US last year, and that did not cause any trouble. Admittedly, I had obtained a fresh passport in the meantime, but it ...


5

If you are traveling to either Dubai or Sharjah wiping your Kindle is not required. If you are traveling with a non-portable computer (a desktop) they may ask you to turn it on just to make sure it is actually a computer and not something else. For portable computers (laptops) you don't have to wipe them either. For printed books it's a different matter, ...


3

Clothing expectations are generally cultural and legal rather than religious. The best bet is to do some research for the country (or countries) you plan to visit. For example, in Indonesia (the world's largest Muslim country by population), it is acceptable for women to dress casually in most places, bikinis on the beach, and so on. But if you're going to ...


3

The trees look amazing! According to Wikitravel: Yemania Airlines offers two flights per week on Friday and Monday: From Sana’a to Socotra Island (Friday departure time 5:00 am) From Aden to Socotra Island (Monday departure 9:00 am) Flight durations are almost three hours. Felix is a new airline and has taken over all flights to Socotra, ...


3

From my first hand experience few years ago and many of friends' experiences earlier and later, Lebanon would refuse visas to unmarried women ages 17 to 30. According to travel guides, it's theoretically possible to get that visa going through very complicated and lengthy bureaucratic process, which makes it impractical for young women tourist. It's also ...


3

Yes, You will be able to find someone. You must contact the local authorities first for permission and they will be able to help you. If you are planning for any tour or traveling somewhere you can take idea from traveling site like koshertravelers site. It will give you good deals about traveling.


3

In theory, nothing has changed: pornography, very broadly defined, remains entirely banned in the UAE. An Internet filter also remains in place, although it's very patchy (playboy.com will be blocked, obscurehotgoatse.xxx probably not) and it's easily circumvented by VPN. In practice, Dubai gets so many visitors that they don't even attempt to control the ...



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