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16

The mordida (nibble) is unfortunately deeply ingrained in Mexico, although mostly a feature of local police and not the federal police or the military, and there are various anti-corruption initiatives at work in the larger cities. Generally, the interaction involves being pulled over for a traffic offense like speeding or not wearing a seat belt. The ...


15

Léon is a small, and somewhat ugly city, and therefore not much of a tourist attraction, so most of the tourist-fraud schemes won't be common there. I have spent many months there, and will be visiting again the end of next week. I don't know your nationality, or how you'll be arriving (by air, bus, driving), so I can only offer a few general suggestions. ...


13

While the kidney thing is almost certainly nonsense, there have been quite a few (by Canadian standards) Canadians murdered in Mexico, and the police investigations verge on nonsensical. Like the young man found in a ditch covered in injuries and the police said "he must have fallen off his motorcycle, and then perhaps someone stole it since there's no sign ...


11

Backdoor Jobs is probably my favourite resource for out of the ordinary job adventures. It includes a variety of different jobs for different people with different backgrounds and experiences. A lot of the jobs listed are leading groups or hiking / trekking, BUT there are a lot of other ones available too. The owner / writer of the site Michael Landers ...


11

Mexico is a great place, and for the most part safe. Obviously you should use common sense, but you will be fine. The resorts and tours are also safe, so enjoy yourself. I lived in southern Mexico for a couple of years and never had a problem (I'm a tall, blonde, white American), Mexicans are very friendly. I do speak Spanish though, and have always felt ...


10

An e-mail to Kahlúa asking about tours was answered with: Thanks for your email and your interest in Kahlúa. Unfortunately we don't currently offer a tour of the Kahlúa facilities. If you have any further questions, please don't hesitate to ask. Best regards Martin


10

A nephew of mine witnessed a shooting at a gas station in Northern Mexico when driving from Mexico City to Texas, but then again that can happen anywhere. I saw a shooting last time I was in L.A. When I was in Mexico in 2008/2009 the northern states felt just as safe as the rest of the country. I did not drive but used public transport and walked a lot. I ...


10

I haven't been to Mexico myself yet, but I've given this some thought recently, from the perspective of visiting Yucatán peninsula (incl Cancún) and maybe other places like Puebla and Veracruz. (Specifically, I've read news and blog posts, and talked with Mexicans and others who've been there.) Here's a summary of my understanding (Nov 2012): How ...


10

First, you did a good thing, there was no comeback, and so it's all good. But I want to answer your more general question for other people in that situation, Many buffets have and explicit 'no leftovers no sharing' policy, if they don't make it explicit up front then they undoubtedly will if you start abusing the buffet. So while sneaking someone a few ...


9

This varies from Car Rental company to Car Rental company. I've found someone who compiled the list of most major car rental companies and their policy w.r.t. to driving the car to Mexico. Most don't allow it. Some do allow it with additional coverage for just such an occasion like Budget. So if you know which car rental company you will be renting from ...


8

Before I visited Mexico for the first time, I also heard many stories about how dangerous it is, especially from Mexicans living in L.A. Then I spent three wonderful months all over Mexico without anything bad happening to me. I consider the part of Cancún where all the hotels are an even safer place. There are only hotels, shopping malls/restaurants and ...


8

Many do, but at a very poor exchange rate. At the time of this post, there are 13.15 mexican pesos per US dollar. But you'll usually get an exchange rate in the range of 10:1-11.5:1. I saw several exchange rates in this range in Puerto Vallarta (which isn't a border town, but does cater to many US tourists) last weekend. The best exchange rate will ...


8

I found this info at https://i94.cbp.dhs.gov/I94/request.html Not sure if it covers my situation: If you received an electronic I-94 upon arrival by air or sea and depart via land, your departure may not be recorded accurately. A departure will be recorded if you depart via land and re-enter the United States prior to the expiration date stamped ...


7

The only thing I can think of is: Air Canada has nonstops SYD-YVR (Vancouver) and YVR-MEX - that's the fastest way. Korean Airlines has SYD-YVR via Seoul


7

After some more research, and help from a friend here in Mexico, I have found that the following bus lines (listed in alphabetical order) offer free WiFi on some of their routes: Autobuses Americanos provided me with Internet access between Austin, TX and Laredo, TX, but once we crossed into Mexico, the Nuevo Laredo to Monterrey stretch had no Internet ...


7

There isn't a lot, culturally speaking, on either side of the U.S./Mexican border. So where to go depends a lot on exactly what you're looking for. The main U.S./Mexican border crossings along the Texas border are: El Paso, Texas / Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua Laredo, Texas / Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas McAllen, Texas / Reynosa, Tamaulipas Brownsville, Texas / ...


7

Short answer: You're still OK, but you have to leave the US before January 8th. You can go anywhere you wish, but before you try to re-enter the US, you must enter a country other than Mexico, Canada or the Caribbean states. For example, it will be fine to travel to Mexico, then Costa Rica, and then return to the US. Longer answer: It's important to ...


6

The category on Driving in Mexico on Wikitravel has a couple of things to say: Never drive above the speed limit or run stop signs/red lights as Mexican police will use any excuse to pull over tourists and give you a ticket. If pulled over by a police officer soliciting a bribe, do not pay the amount requested, but pull out USD$50 or 500 pesos, and ...


6

According to Mexperience.com, some buses do indeed have wifi onboard, but generally only in Executive Class buses: ETN's buses now offer WiFi on some routes. The service is free and enables you to send/receive email, surf the net and make internet-based phone calls from the bus using a service like Skype. Service quality varies and, depending on ...


6

Contacting Aaron Vanek who wrote an article with examiner.com about a tour of the factory may give you a good start. On location with Kahlua coffee liqueur in Mexico (part VI - finale)


6

From the US Consulate: Tourists to Mexico wishing to travel beyond the border zone with their car must obtain a temporary import permit or risk having their car confiscated by Mexican customs officials. To acquire a permit, one must submit evidence of citizenship, title for the car, a car registration certificate and a driver's license to a ...


6

These are some tips based on my own experience driving extensively in Mexico (although not so much specifically along the Baja peninsula) Don't travel between major cities at night. Especially within 2 hours of the U.S. border. This is where the drug cartels are generally most active, and kidnappings are most common. Drive an unimpressive vehicle if ...


6

First, in general, if you take a shore excursion from the ship then you are protected against getting back late. The ship will wait for you. If you take an independent excursion, the ship will leave without you, you are subject to fines, and it is your problem as to how to get to the next port to rejoin the ship. I have experienced first hand an excursion ...


6

You need to remove the permit from the windshield, which needs to be turned in, and carry it with you. Customs wants it back to refund the deposit and they will not let you get a new permit if you have not turned in an old one. If the car is involved in a accident and is a total loss it is best to remove the permit from the windshield. If the car is stolen ...


6

The volcano is almost straight west from the church. So you will have to go east from it to get that view. To find the right spot, one source would be the explorer bar of Google maps. If you open google maps along the road Routa Quetzalcoatl and check the bottom photo bar, you can hover over photos. There will be a white line from the photo to the map ...


6

Since you mention that you are open to getting to Cuba not necessarily directly from Europe but through a intermediate destination, my recommendation would be to consider one of two Canadian travel hubs: Montreal and Toronto. I recommend these because destinations in and around where Cuba are the main tourist places for Canadians for a big chunk of the ...


6

Visa typically go in (or are used in conjunction with) a travel document (that's actually an explicit requirement in countries I am familiar with, I don't know Mexican law but official websites suggest it's the same there, see below). So even if you somehow got a visa, that wouldn't solve the passport problem. But having a green card should exempt you from ...


6

The hotel won't mind if you check in and not use any of their services ... less food eaten equals less cost to them. But while you may not want to officially check out as that might cancel the last night you plan to use, it might be good to let the front desk know you may not be sleeping there every night, so they don't call the police when your room is ...


5

According to the visa rules for Mexico that I got off IATA, the rules say (for Philippines passport holders): Visa required, except for a stay of max. 180 days: for alien residents of United Kingdom holding a permanent residence permit. for holders of a valid visa for the USA. CIBT elaborates that no passport is required for people who: ...


5

The Pan American Highway is probably the most popular route. Mexico and possibly other countries require insurance from an underwriter in that country. It will probably be a lot cheaper to arrange that before the trip. It would be worth checking to see if it is unsafe to travel in certain areas, and at night. In Nicaragua, for example, there have been ...



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