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18

Yes, but it depends on 2 things : Your destination country law, and your home country law. Here is an example : Indonesian couples wants to get married in Singapore. The following rules apply : They have to apply their notice of Marriage at Registry Of Marriage Singapore At least one of them has to be physically present within Singapore for a ...


15

Generally No. Again this depends completely on the marriage laws of your home country and possibly also the ship's home country. But according to this (German) article, most countries do not allow this. It even mentions a number of regulations (by the US Navy, the state of New York, and the British merchant navy) that explicitly disallow it. It also ...


14

I believe you should be able to form a civil partnership or marriage in the UK as foreigners, regardless of it being same-sex or not. From 29 March 2014, same sex couples can get married in England and Wales. You can only get a civil partnership as a same sex couple. There're some differences being made between marriage and civil partnership, but as ...


12

You are a British national and your wife-to-be is Uruguayan, a non-visa national. You want to travel to the UK with her for a visit. A spouse visa is not required if they do not plan on settling in the UK; it's the wrong visa for visiting. A non-visa national who intends to maintain family relationships in the UK would apply for leave to enter as either a ...


12

My sister did it, so it's possible. The bureaucratic hoops she had to jump through to get the marriage recognised at home were however significant, not because of unwillingness by authorities but mostly because of the amount of paperwork that had to be signed, countersigned, and sent back and forth between the Hague city hall, Las Vegas city hall, and ...


9

From Kate's first link: International marriage information: Couples from outside the United States can be married in Las Vegas. Most countries will want a certified copy of your marriage certificate and an Apostille from the Nevada Secretary of State. The marriage certificate costs $10 and the Apostille costs $20. The Nevada Secretary of State can send the ...


8

You'd have to verify this, but Las Vegas could be an option. However, the question is whether your country of residence accepts this marriage; contacting the US consulate of your home country might be a good idea; they would also be able to tell you what you'd have to do to validate your marriage before you leave the US.


8

Here are some of the options I could find out, there might be more: Argentina actually made a point of allowing foreigners to marry specifically when they are gay. Denmark does not seem to have any issues with foreigners getting married there. In Spain however you will have to wait some time for the approval, and better be in Madrid.


8

There are several aspects of the rules around marriage in France that would make your plan difficult. As far as I know, it's not forbidden to marry as a non-resident but the law is clearly not intended to make it easy. You need to complete some formalities beforehand (publication des bans). It should happen at least 10 days before the wedding but you also ...


7

That depends completely on the laws concerning marriage in your home country. I'd say that in most countries it is possible, but there may be varying documentation or other requirements (and restrictions) for the marriage to be legally accepted. Ask whatever authority is beaurocratically responsible for marriages in your country; they should know best. ...


6

I am sure that the reunification visa is a permanent one, so it wouldn't make sense for the authorities to worried about you staying longer than you should. That wasn't the case with the student visa, so since this is a different visa you shouldn't worry.


5

From the further information you provided in the comments, all of your questions are given in the rules... You have a multiple entry clearance and you have NOT yet married (and presumably you have a good reason for not marrying during your last visit). So yes, it's ok to enter again. This is stated in Paragraph 20A of the rules. Had you been married, ...


5

Most cruise ships have chapels for religious services, and for weddings. As to the details, look them up, or confirm them with the cruise line beforehand. In some instances, the ships captains can perform the functions of a justice of the peace. In other case, you need a clergyman/woman. And location of the ship could make a difference, as could the ...


5

Canada allows same sex marriage and I know an Irish resident who came here to be married a few years ago. He stayed less than a week and the whole process was simple and pleasant for them both. Over a year ago, the government announced they would tweak our law specifically to ensure such marriages were recognized properly: The federal government is ...


5

India is a very religious country, so the couple's religion can matter. If they are in different religions, do it in favor of whose side you are visiting for. It is accepted if you leave cash in an envelope for the couple. Observe others to see whether they write the names in it or not, and follow. Usually, there are envelopes available on-site. I can't ...


4

France just passed a law to allow two people of the same sex to marry but it seems difficult to come to France just for that. Generally speaking, in France, you can't choose where you marry, even as a French national living in the country. At least one of the future partners should either have his or her usual residence (domicile) in the town (commune) or ...


4

There is nothing to prevent non-residents to marry in Iowa. You just have to follow the three day waiting period after applying. I'm sure several other US states allow non-residents to marry as well. The question remains if your home country/state acknowledges the marriage. Iowa's gay-marriage law sparks tourism


4

There are still a handful of situations where being married makes things possible that would otherwise be impossible. (Hospital consent, hotel room sharing, being on the same immigration form, etc.) In the vast majority of these cases, an opposite sex couple can get through by simply stating they are married. Occasionally the "proof" of having ID with the ...


4

I got married in Philippines (Catholic). So I can give you some insights. My family is from Spain, but my wife's family is from Philippines. Dressing for women was practically the same as in Spain (formal dress but for a very hot/humid weather). All the male guests were wearing barong tagalog that we rented few days earlier. I was also wearing barong ...


4

As far as I know, in France (“copie d'acte de mariage” or “extrait d'acte de mariage”) or Germany (“Eheurkunde”), marriage certificates do not mention the previous status of the spouses. Obviously if you were to divorce from this marriage then this divorce would be mentioned in the register as well. You can't just drop in and marry, however. In France, for ...


4

Here in Spain it would be very typical to end the toast saying: ¡Vivan los novios!, in a typical catholic wedding this sentence would also be employed when the newly married went out of the church and people started throwing rice at them and shouting this aloud. It means (more or less, I don't know how to translate it exactly) that you're wishing them a ...


4

The same-sex part of your situation is irrelevant in the US. The issue for you will be, if the plan is you enter the US on a tourist visa, marry, then apply to change your visa status on the grounds you are married to an US citizen. If you do that, ICE will suspect you of visa fraud -- and they will likely be right. If you want to come to the US to get ...


3

There is no international standard for this as there is for passports, probably because marriage customs and procedures are just too diverse. As Kate said, people will usually take your word for it for most everyday purposes such as travellign (getting a visa for Saudi Arabia may be the exception). Actual proof of marriage is usually only required for ...


3

I didn't want to just provide anecdotal notes, but since Mark Mayo encouraged it here are some -- I've been to several weddings in the Philippines and I've heard about many more. The short answer to your question is: it varies. Wildly. A lot of what the Wikipedia page says can happen, but none of it is guaranteed -- weddings are really up to the couple, ...


3

I would telephone the local US consulate in Australia an make an appointment to discuss the situation. Immigration rules are very specific in the US and it is likely since the follow up paperwork was not supplied that your wife does not enjoy the status she would have. Please speak with the officials before you start your journey. My guess is she will ...


3

I did it, my wife and I live in Israel and got married in New York. All we had to do was get an apostele (stamp) from New York State and register with the ministry of the Interior back in Israel. The only complication was getting her divorce decree translated from Hebrew to English and notarized. Thankfully we found a notary in NY who read Hebrew and could ...


3

It has so far not been pointed out that at least in some countries you can not get married (or give notice of a marriage) if you do not have a certain special "marriage visa." This depends on the regulations of the country where you would want to marry (and you and your significant other's citizenships) so a general answer is out of scope but a prime ...


3

France is a free country, so you can basically do as you please, and a flash mob shouldn't be an issue anywhere in a public setting. However, if you want to stick to the letter of the law, this would probably be considered a public reunion, which may require authorisation from the "Préfecture". Also, the use of music in a public setting normally implies ...


2

The answer is: absolutely! There are multiple destinations that can do this while you travel. The possibility of this depends on the laws of the country and province(state) that you will want do this in. For example in most states in the United States is usually performed by an official like a judge and requires some sort of documentation, registration, ...



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