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46

It does remotely look like an airplane as Google Maps / Earth reveals:


39

The ocean floor. Any other unexplored spots pale in comparison with about 75% of the planet's surface covered by oceans, of which hardly anything deeper than 100m has been meaningfully explored. There are literally millions of square kilometers about which we know nothing except a very coarse-grained depth profile. There could be a hundred sunken Atlantises ...


34

It's clearly visible in Google Maps, where you'll also notice that it is much larger than a real airliner. The human brain is very good at recognizing pattern, and in your case it identified this lake loosely resembling an airliner. The phenomenon of recognizing patterns in random data is called Apophenia. So in summary, there is no reason to assume this ...


24

Roads, pretty much by definition, are mapped somewhere. In northern Ontario there are "logging roads" which were made by the logging companies and don't have the same legality as a road made by government (municipal or otherwise.) But if someone got out some heavy equipment and made a road, there is a map somewhere that shows it. It just might not be a ...


18

If you have a Nokia Symbian device, then you can get Ovi Maps installed on it. Ovi Maps allows you to download map files for as many countries as you want and store in on your memory card. Once that's done, you can set Ovi Maps to offline mode and still be able to use it to get directions. If you get a local SIM, then it will be able to show you rough ...


18

I've found (anecdotally) that initially in London, the walking times were way too slow - I was beating the times regularly. Then I moved to Vancouver and found them too fast. I'm a quick walker, so wasn't sure what was happening. I eventually figured it was down to knowledge. I 'knew' London far better, and even though I might be using a map, I could ...


18

Here you go: 全国鉄軌道路線図 ¥1,296 from Amazon.co.jp. Here's a blog review with some pictures of the map folded out. And yes, that's entirely in Japanese, I very much doubt such a thing exists in English. To get some idea of the effort that would entail, here's a closeup of another incomplete & partial map covering just the Tokyo metro area.


18

That's Pineview Reservoir. It has a three-fingered shape (or fuselage-and-wings shape) because it was built at the confluence of several streams. It is indeed a real body of water, but not technically a lake. Sources: Firsthand experience at the reservoir https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pineview_Dam https://www.google.com/maps/@41.2660977,-111.8092137,13z ...


17

For the mountain has not been explored yet : Gamburtsev The Gamburtsev Mountain Range (also known as the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains) is a subglacial mountain range located in Eastern Antarctica, near Dome A.The range was discovered by the 3rd Soviet Antarctic. It is approximately 1,200 kilometres (750 mi) long, and the mountains are believed to be ...


16

Maybe the next Movile cave, which has been separated from the rest of the world for millions years, until 1986? Or some remote mountains on the south of Chile: Access is difficult and weather is not friendly. I would not be surprised if some have not been climbed yet.


16

Yes! Google maps recently added the possibility of doing exactly this! I noticed it for the first time today. When you query the route for a specific destination a new option shows up above the possible routes which allows you to choose to depart at a particular time or arrive at a particular time. In the later case it suggests the time that you should ...


15

UPDATE: TomTom now have maps for Iceland. As of their latest update, this has been added to the 'Western Europe' collection for many devices. TomTom use "TeleAtlas" maps, and in fact they actually bought TeleAtlas several years ago. As with most mapping companies, TeleAtlas has varying levels of coverage for different countries. For countries like the ...


14

Many Parts of New Guinea have not been reached yet because of extensive forestation: The uncontacted tribes in the Brazilian Amazon are fascinating! Here is a link to a video clip of a flyover, where you can peek into the lives people who have never been contacted before!


13

Apparently some of the Venezuelan Tepui remain unexplored. Many of them are part of a national park however, and you might need permits to vist (and you couldn't leave a flag there!)


13

TravellersPoint has a great map making feature. Google MyMaps or Google Earth could also be good tools for creating a map. Google Earth in particular now supports "Tours" that you can record to show an animated path, even with narration and photos.


13

Good, but not perfect. Any planning tool can only give you estimates based on past experience, but predicting the future is by nature fraught with risk. For reasons explained below in detail, Google Maps is currently less accurate for this route in particular and Japan in general than it would be for, say, the SF Bay Area in the US. As Mark points out, ...


12

Well, you can go old-shool: buy a decent road atlas. Usually there is a table with distances between larger cities (either at the beginning or at the end) - so using it you can have an idea about the scale. Moreover, on every decent road map you will have distances on the actual map - however these are usually between junctions etc., so you will have to sum ...


12

The center of Zurich is not very big, and most places in Zurich are actually whole streets and areas that are interesting. Generally you can consider the whole area between the Bahnhofstrasse, Bahhofbrücke, Seilergraben, Rämistrasse, and the Quaibrücke as the inner center of the city (more or less the district Kreis 1. There are some more places of course. ...


12

Short answer: No. Long answer: Google used to provide this service, but stopped apparently some time in 2011, saying it was inaccurate because it "provided users with the worst case traffic scenario based on historic traffic data." They have since added current traffic condition reporting/routing, but it doesn't predict into the future. From this post: ...


12

US Topo maps don't presently include these features, mainly because USGS doesn't collect the data. USGS is working on incorporating data from non-governmental organizations into the US Topo maps, however that work is expected to take a while, and some types of data are considered low priority. A FAQ entry addresses these issues in some depth: Why are there ...


11

In addition to what Kate said about rivers, it's worth noting that current mapping of even oceans is subject to change, error or re-writing. Late last year a team of scientists was in the South Pacific doing a geographical survey of Sandy Island, 20 miles long and 5 miles wide. There was just one problem. The island doesn't exist. It was on Google maps ...


11

Western Europe is divided north and south by the Alps. For this reason, there are currently no water routes that go all the way from northern to southern Europe. The closest thing for now to a pan-European waterway is a route along the Rhine to Bavaria, to a point just over 100 miles from the Danube. A canal connecting the two was completed in 1992. This ...


11

You want bvg.de. It has English and German versions, and if you visit the site on a mobile device it'll offer a mobile optimised version. They have an excellent trip planner, covering regional trains, S-Bahn, U-Bahn, Bus, Tram and walking. You can also download various network maps for offline use. In addition to the website, there are a number of apps ...


11

Lucerne has an old city and a new city part, split by the river running through it. On this map, you can see the pink "Altstadt" (=old city) where the river ends in the lake, at the centre. The main train station is just south-east of that, across the river. I would consider the Altstadt the center of the city, others might consider one of the bridges the ...


11

These are platform numbers. The colour indicates the line but the number is specific to the station. (Online confirmation) You can note the platform numbers (I think trains of different lines always leave from different platforms in Hong Kong, ), but they vary from station to station.


11

It's just to match the normative symbols to some degree that are usually used for each of the various types of roads in each country. You can fairly easily check this by comparing any maps or roadsigns in the country you're from, the country you're in, or international road atlases, which also try to match the normative symbols. By "types" or "grades" of ...


11

Best I can think of is Legal Walls, which maps graffiti locations around the world. While you are in London, be sure to check out the Leake Street Tunnel [ images here ] - a three minute walk away from the London Eye, which was set up by Banksy as part of the Cans Festival in 2008. The tunnel used to form access for the now defunct Eurostar terminal at ...


10

FIrstly, even if you COULD get offline Google Maps, it's not that useful in non western countries. Murmansk - the largest city in the arctic circle, is shown as just two streets in Google Maps. Most of their coverage of Central Asia is next to useless as well. In addition, you need some serious storage for offline google maps. What I eventually settled ...



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