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34

The ocean floor. Any other unexplored spots pale in comparison with about 75% of the planet's surface covered by oceans, of which hardly anything deeper than 100m has been meaningfully explored. There are literally millions of square kilometers about which we know nothing except a very coarse-grained depth profile. There could be a hundred sunken Atlantises ...


19

If you have a Nokia Symbian device, then you can get Ovi Maps installed on it. Ovi Maps allows you to download map files for as many countries as you want and store in on your memory card. Once that's done, you can set Ovi Maps to offline mode and still be able to use it to get directions. If you get a local SIM, then it will be able to show you rough ...


18

Roads, pretty much by definition, are mapped somewhere. In northern Ontario there are "logging roads" which were made by the logging companies and don't have the same legality as a road made by government (municipal or otherwise.) But if someone got out some heavy equipment and made a road, there is a map somewhere that shows it. It just might not be a ...


15

Maybe the next Movile cave, which has been separated from the rest of the world for millions years, until 1986? Or some remote mountains on the south of Chile: Access is difficult and weather is not friendly. I would not be surprised if some have not been climbed yet.


15

For the mountain has not been explored yet : Gamburtsev The Gamburtsev Mountain Range (also known as the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains) is a subglacial mountain range located in Eastern Antarctica, near Dome A.The range was discovered by the 3rd Soviet Antarctic. It is approximately 1,200 kilometres (750 mi) long, and the mountains are believed to be ...


13

There are different handheld GPS units. My favourite is the Garmin eTrex. Garmin's own MapSource maps are usually quite expensive and require annual updates. OpenStreetMap is a nice alternative; you should check the site if the coverage in the required area fits your needs. The quality of data is quite okay too. The map data can be stored offline in a ...


13

TomTom use "TeleAtlas" maps, and in fact they actually bought TeleAtlas several years ago. As with most mapping companies, TeleAtlas has varying levels of coverage for different countries. For countries like the US, TeleAtlas has near 100% coverage, which is to say that they have not just major highways, but all the way down to minor streets and even (in ...


12

Try Egypt, or the Sahara at large. in 2012 a WWII british airplane was found 70 years after it made an emergency landing in Egypt. The poor pilot made it safely on to the ground, the sad part is that it took 70 years before some one else came along. It was still in pristine condition. In that time simply nobody passed that location. Who knows what still ...


12

Well, you can go old-shool: buy a decent road atlas. Usually there is a table with distances between larger cities (either at the beginning or at the end) - so using it you can have an idea about the scale. Moreover, on every decent road map you will have distances on the actual map - however these are usually between junctions etc., so you will have to sum ...


11

Western Europe is divided north and south by the Alps. For this reason, there are currently no water routes that go all the way from northern to southern Europe. The closest thing for now to a pan-European waterway is a route along the Rhine to Bavaria, to a point just over 100 miles from the Danube. A canal connecting the two was completed in 1992. This ...


11

Many Parts of New Guinea have not been reached yet because of extensive forestation: The uncontacted tribes in the Brazilian Amazon are fascinating! Here is a link to a video clip of a flyover, where you can peek into the lives people who have never been contacted before!


11

Lucerne has an old city and a new city part, split by the river running through it. On this map, you can see the pink "Altstadt" (=old city) where the river ends in the lake, at the centre. The main train station is just south-east of that, across the river. I would consider the Altstadt the center of the city, others might consider one of the bridges the ...


11

These are platform numbers. The colour indicates the line but the number is specific to the station. (Online confirmation) You can note the platform numbers (I think trains of different lines always leave from different platforms in Hong Kong, ), but they vary from station to station.


10

Apparently some of the Venezuelan Tepui remain unexplored. Many of them are part of a national park however, and you might need permits to vist (and you couldn't leave a flag there!)


10

FIrstly, even if you COULD get offline Google Maps, it's not that useful in non western countries. Murmansk - the largest city in the arctic circle, is shown as just two streets in Google Maps. Most of their coverage of Central Asia is next to useless as well. In addition, you need some serious storage for offline google maps. What I eventually settled ...


10

TravellersPoint has a great map making feature. Google MyMaps or Google Earth could also be good tools for creating a map. Google Earth in particular now supports "Tours" that you can record to show an animated path, even with narration and photos.


10

I think what you probably want is the OpenStreetMap powered OpenRouteService. When using OpenRouteService, once it has calculated your route, then in the Extras/Download area there's a link for Route Profile. Click that, wait while it processes, and you'll get the profile you're after. You get profiles that look a little like this: If you want to try it ...


10

The center of Zurich is not very big, and most places in Zurich are actually whole streets and areas that are interesting. Generally you can consider the whole area between the Bahnhofstrasse, Bahhofbrücke, Seilergraben, Rämistrasse, and the Quaibrücke as the inner center of the city (more or less the district Kreis 1. There are some more places of course. ...


9

Zip codes were not allocated to these areas. When needed, MX will be substituted by numbers when the zip code is allocated for a portion of the "filler" area. See for example 99691 within the 996MX area. Alaska is huge and very sparsely populated. No point in allocating zip codes for areas where no-one is going to send any mail.


8

I've got a smartphone which can cache maps locally (it's a Nokia N900, but lots of other ones do that too, with a few notable exceptions). Before I go somewhere, on Wi-Fi I browse around the area I'll be visiting, so the phone downloads all the maps. When I'm there, I can then navigate around without needing to download anything, just using the cached maps ...


8

In addition to what Kate said about rivers, it's worth noting that current mapping of even oceans is subject to change, error or re-writing. Late last year a team of scientists was in the South Pacific doing a geographical survey of Sandy Island, 20 miles long and 5 miles wide. There was just one problem. The island doesn't exist. It was on Google maps ...


8

For hiking maps and an overview map, the Danish company ScanMaps is a good source of printed maps. Also try Harvey/Compukort. For town maps, Greenland.com has interactive online maps. Most towns will also have a free printed tourist map. Arctic Umiaq Line provides in-season ferry service on the west coast. And don't be too down on OpenStreetMaps. The ...


8

Such a map is impossible, or at least it cannot be consistent. It might be possible on a 3D map. Mathematically, I think this is because you cannot form a consistent metric based on travel distance since it cannot always satisfy the triangle inequality. For example, imagine you have a mountainous natural reserve with a resort town in the middle, and around ...


8

Short answer: No. Long answer: Google used to provide this service, but stopped apparently some time in 2011, saying it was inaccurate because it "provided users with the worst case traffic scenario based on historic traffic data." They have since added current traffic condition reporting/routing, but it doesn't predict into the future. From this post: ...


8

I use TripIT to manage most of my travel plans, itineraries and reference codes, and a nice side-effect of this is that you can pull out reports from TripIT by country, city, and I think even district (I only have the free version, not the TripIT Pro version) One of the things I did look at using using though is Tripline. It lets you do not only maps and ...


7

I would be very surprised if the majority of either Antarctica or Greenland has ever been touched by a human on the ground. On the other hand, there's effectively nothing to see in such locations, either.


7

UNESCO World Heritage Center provides a list with a map. Square bullets denote cultural heritage whereas round bullets denote natural heritage. Unfortunately, not many natural attractions are listed there.


7

You could look at http://www.openstreetmap.org/ which is google maps meets wikipedia. It's all copyleft, so you can download it yourself. However you'll have to find a suitable applicaton/format youself. Hunt around the http://wiki.openstreetmap.org


7

The tourist information offices in Ireland (here's a list from the Irish Tourist Organisation, 'Discover Ireland') sell booklets with maps of campsites. I got one in the Dublin office for €5. It lists loads of campsites, has some photographs of them, lists details (opening days, phone numbers, directions, facilities, etc.). They also sell booklets of ...


7

While I've seen some academic research being done toward eventually creating these sorts of maps (I work in a transit-related industry), I'm not aware of any end-user products being available yet. At the present, I think your best solution is to use a crowd-sourced social navigation community such as Waze. Their system enables you to send chats to other ...



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