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18

In general, when a traveller loses their passport they should contact a consulate or embassy of the country where they are a citizen. The consulate may be able to quickly issue an emergency passport or other travel document, that will allow the holder to travel and depart the country they are in. However, the traveller should definitely seek to replace their ...


17

While it is true that taxi drivers will try to overcharge you in Malaysia, it is also true that the rates set by the government are on the low side. The official rate is 1 MYR / kilometre which converts roughly to $0.3. Tourism drives up prices in cities in Kuala Lumpur and Penang, and I am willing to sympathise with the taxi drivers. Unlike Western ...


15

When proof of onward travel is required, it is always the job of an airline to check whether your documentation is in place. If not, and if you have to be deported, I believe in this situation the airline has to bear the cost of flying you back; this is standard practice around the world. Malaysia implements these requirements pretty unevenly. Citizens of ...


14

These are used to wash the private areas after using the toilet, it is the upgrade to the jug, so instead of filling a jug and use it to wash you use the hose directly. To use it, hold it with one hand (the dominant) and press, water stream will wash away things, you also can use the other hand (non-dominant) to clean while aiming the stream to the private ...


12

Having been to both during Ramadan: In all reasonably touristy areas in Thailand, including the southern resort islands, you basically will not notice Ramadan at all -- pretty much everything is open as usual. Malaysia, though, is a different story. While you certainly can get drinks and food, most places that stay open do so a little discreetly, with ...


8

Well, you cannot get all three out of 'easy, cheap, quick' so you'll have to pick and choose. The Wikitravel entry on Kuala Lumpur has a comprehensive list of options available to get from the airport to the city (same article that you linked to, different section). Kuala Lumpur has a vast urban train network but the confusing part is that they are all ...


8

I have been to KL twice this year and hope to go back again - I had the exact same problem as you! I would say Ankur made some good points in his answer, but, I just wanted to add a bit that is too much for comments, then my own experiences on top... Prepaid counters are a rip off and often charge more than most taxi drivers would try to rip you off for! ...


8

Ok, Since I travel to Sabah a lot, here is my take on your plan. Fly from KL to KK and make that your start/end point. Explore KK Town Check out the islands (Manukan and Sapi which are only 15 minutes from town) Explore Kinabalu National Park (2 hrs away from KK) Fly KK to Sandakan (45 mins) Explore Sandakan, filled with Eco Tourism. Places like Sepilok ...


8

For Kuala Lumpur you should dress however you are comfortable (okay, not naked, you need to have some level of modesty); you'll be okay walking around the city in a sleeveless t-shirt, shorts and flip-flops/thongs. You probably won't be dressed appropriately for some venues, but you're fine for standard tourist activities. This dress is a bit uncommon for ...


7

Not sure where you heard that information. I was in Malaysia about two years ago, any significant Malaysian bank will accept your ATM card. And I had no problems while in Kuantan OR Kuala Lumpur. Now, there are banks non-Muslims are not permitted in, but there was only one of those I saw while in Kuala Lumpur. A bigger issue, at least when I was there and ...


7

Tioman island would be a good place for diving. I went there last year. It's a beautiful little island about 50km off the east coast of peninsular Malaysia. You have to take a bus to Mersing, a port city in Johor state. From the port at Mersing you can take the ferry to Tioman. Bus ride from KL to Mersing is about 6 hours. I found the night bus more ...


7

Right, I've finally formed an answer for this. From a Lonely Planet forum: http://www.lonelyplanet.com/thorntree/thread.jspa?threadID=1571042 Camping is not really done in Malaysia. There are no campsites except at places like the National Park, and then you can rent gear. Of course, that doesn't mean it's illegal, just not common. However: ...


7

I suggest the Perhentian Islands. It's off the east coast of west Malaysia (so not Borneo) and is relatively less frequented by tourists. Access is easy from the town of Kota Bharu - part of the Jungle Railway route - from where it takes 1.5 hours by taxi (or slightly longer by public bus) to reach Kuala Besut. A speedboat ride should cost about 60 MYR and ...


7

So I'm afraid all the best dive spots in Malaysia are out in Jan-Feb. As you've discovered, it's monsoon season on the east coast of the Peninsula, as well as at the famed dive spot of Sipadan in Sabah, Borneo. The weather is better on the west coast and in some bits of Sarawak, like Miri, but the diving is not that great any time of year. The good news is ...


7

Yes. It will take less than 1 hour, by train, to get from city center to KUL. That leaves you with three hours which is more than adequate for an international flight. The biggest concern will be the time it takes to get to from your meeting to the train station. Another thing you should consider is how your luggage will encumber you.


7

Usually questions like these get closed as subjective, but in KL's case I think there's a pretty objective answer: The Petronas Towers! (courtesy me) Especially at night... (courtesy Someformofhuman, Wikimedia Commons) Sure, there are taller skyscrapers these days, but (IMHO) few are prettier, and nothing else in KL that you can cover in an hour comes ...


6

Had you try Tioman Island? It's located at Southern part of West Malaysia.


6

I have been living in Singapore for 8 years and have done a fair amount of travel in South East Asia (mostly Malaysia and Thailand) both professional and personal trips, also my wife is Malaysian which provides some insight. Being "European", it took me a fair amount of time to get use to the negotiation. Don't take this personally and always say no thanks ...


6

In Thailand, it depends on where you'll be going. Anywhere from Bangkok northwards, you won't notice anything in relation to Ramadan. There's a significant muslim presence in the south of Thailand (the sliver of land that borders Malaysia), but I don't know to what extent Ramadan celebrations there spill over into public life. Malaysia is religiously ...


6

I'm not sure why you pick Port Dickson, it's not really a favourable travel destination any more afaik. About the taxi, you should be able to get it from the airport. go to the official taxi counter and buy the taxi voucher from there only (not from anywhere or anyone else), this should be the safest way. The fare should be less than RM 150 (estimation ...


6

You have a couple of options for doing this: Tioman Island: Very popular and consistently busy due to its how easy it is to reach from Singapore. (And thus gets a lot of weekend visitors from there.) You'll need to take a bus to Mersing to catch the ferry to Tioman. It is, however, somewhat of a touristy destination. That may be a good thing or a bad thing ...


6

Malaysians love their motosikal and you can easily tour the country by bike without using expressways. For example, for Johor Bahru to Kuala Lumpur, and even onward past Penang all the way to the Thai border, you can use the old National Highway 1. (Tip: do a search in Google Maps, pop open "Show options", and choose "Avoid highways". Here's Singapore to ...


5

You might be better off specifically going to Penang (Malaysia), so you can visit the Thai Embassy there and purchase a 90-day visa (as opposed to the traditional 30-day visa). It's quite easy to do the visa run from Phuket, and I would assume the same goes for Krabi as from memory it is quite close to Phuket. When you're in Krabi or Phuket, go to a travel ...


5

I have visited Borneo many times and its a beautiful destination. The major draws for me to Borneo are the jungle scenery and the native tribal cultures. If you have a lot of time and want to experience all of Borneo, I would recommend flying into Kuching and out of Kota Kinabalu (or vice versa) with a stop in Brunei. In Kuching, Bako National Park, the ...


5

The definitely can. TSA works with lock companies to develop locks they can remove without damaging the luggage. Which also states that they may choose to open your bags. I am pretty sure that other agencies providing security at airports have similar capabilities.


5

Assuming I lock my luggage, what can they do if they suspect the baggage? Are they allowed to break the luggage without my permission? Similar question: Where does a 600 pound Gorilla sit? If by "security officials" you mean Customs Officials processing passengers in or out of a country then the general rule is that they can do essentially anything ...


5

For Singapore, camping is limited to certain places: Changi Beach Park - From Carpark 1 to Carpark 4 and Carpark 6 to Carpark 7) East Coast Park - Area D and Area G Pasir Ris Park - Area 1 and Area 3 West Coast Park - Area 3 For all the places above, a camping permit is required, however you can apply for it easily online at the AXS website. The maximum ...


5

YES. I don't know if it will work for everybody every time but it worked for me today. The lady at the Air Asia X check-in counter in Sydney airport asked me for my onward ticket when she saw I was flying to KL one-way. I presented the e-ticket for my train trip to Singapore, which only cost about $10. At immigration in Kuala Lumpur they didn't ask me any ...


5

My reading of that -- and I'm obviously not a Chinese immigration bureaucrat -- is that she's probably OK without the visa, as long as you can make the trip out to be Malaysia->China->Malaysia via Hong Kong on both legs. From Malaysia to Hong Kong, as long as she claims to be going to Shenzhen or wherever, she is "in transit through Hong Kong" and "will go ...


5

According to Malaysian immigration department as a Libyan you don't need a visa if your stay does not exceed 14 days. Given that you stay is exactly that much you shouldn't have to apply for a visa. If you intend to stay longer then you will need a visa and likely from the consulate in your home country.



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