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17

Don't book before you get there. The prices quoted by silent1mezzo are staggeringly expensive, compared to what you can get once you're actually in Peru. Most 5day tours should run for less than $200USD. The first step is to get to Cusco. You can fly there (landing there is pretty spectacular) or you can get a cheap bus from pretty much anywhere else in the ...


9

The answer depends on (at least) two things. Whether you want to do the 'proper' Inca trail or one of the alternatives and what time of the year you are going. If you want to do the proper trail in high season you should book in advanced. Sometimes it is fully booked for 3 months. I was there in October (not high season) and I stayed in Cusco for two weeks ...


7

Gap Adventures has tonnes of Machu Picchu trips (80 in the search) that go around and trek through Machu Picchu. They're not overly expensive (21 days is only $2800). Gap always have very experience guides. Contiki Tours also have a few trips through Machu Picchu. I haven't been on one of their trips so I can't vouch for them. Contiki looks a little more ...


7

When you load the official page, the first thing you'll hopefully notice is the advisory saying that Visa transactions are not possible at this moment. As a result, you can't buy advance tickets from outside of Peru directly with the website. However, there are still many other ways to do this. I'd recommend this guide for sources on how to do it. There ...


7

Machu Picchu itself is only around 2400 metres above sea level - well below the altitude that most people would suffer any real effects of altitude sickness, and about 1000 metres lower than Cuzco (3400 metres) where most people visit before heading to Machu Picchu. If you are planning to trek then it really depends on which path you take. The "Inca Trail" ...


6

I did this two and a half years ago, and took a 75L pack and a day pack. My friend also had one, and the six others in our group also had backpacks plus odds and ends. There was no problem. However, the train was also only half full (October). I imagine the rules are there so that in the peak season, if it's busy they can then start enforcing them. So ...


6

Essentially what you're asking is covered quite extensively in "Avoiding or minimising altitude sickness". In terms of Machu Picchu, be aware that the treks are NOT easy walks. The Inca trail is a long, difficult walk. Extremely fit and active relatives and friends found it to be, and I quote "the hardest thing I've ever done in my life". You're in the ...


6

The main Inca trail has a limit of 500 people starting on it each day. This sounds like a lot, until you realise 300 of those are porters! So it's quite hard to get it. My brother had to book months in advance. However, there are several other trails. Salcantay is meant to be higher, less ruins but more scenic. I'm told the Lares trail goes along the ...


5

Never seen a problem with this. I did it once with a large 80L backpack plus one camera bag weighing considerably more than 8kg and once with a rolling 26" suitcase plus an even larger camera bag. No problem in either case. Keep in mind that this is not an official rule but checks tend to be loose on trains compared to airplanes.


5

I trekked part of the Lares for 3 days and 2 nights at the end of February. We crossed 2 passes of around 4000m high during this excursion. Itinerary: Day 1: Leave Ollantaytambo at 7am by van and we reach our destination around 10am. You also climb your first pass before the end of the day. Day 2: Wake up early at 5am and leave camp at 7am for your ...


4

Even if you're with a tour group, you almost all enter at the same point, and will be buying tickets at the gate. It's important to note that while there's generally a few thousand a day at Machu Picchu, they severely restrict the numbers each day for Huayana Picchu. So if you want one of those (2x200 I believe), you need to make sure you're on the first ...


4

Unless you are planning being there outside of opening hours or for a purpose other than tourism, that is not the case. When entering the reserve, you buy an entrance ticket. They are valid for one or two days. There is no need to acquire this ticket in advance, doing so at the main gate is typical. Some travel agencies, at least those in Peru, may be able ...


3

Most likely the tour operators aren't actually sold out as such, but the the permits are. When there are no permits available, no tour operator is going to be able to help you! Permits are indeed required for all hikers on the on the "Inca Trail", and for peak periods they often sell out months in advance as only ~200 hikers are allowed to set-out on the ...


2

I'd be worried about a tour operator that only charged $200 for the Inca Trail. Some of the cheap operators underpay their porters. Since their the ones doing all of the hard work, it's worth putting in some effort to find an operator that treats the porters well. We went with SAS Travel in December of 2010. It was significantly off season so it rained ...


1

I would recommend you book in advance especially if you go in high season (April to September). Regardless of the route you choose you will have an unforgettable experience. Salkantay route doesn't have many archaeological sites but is offset by the beauty of the landscape. Regarding the Classic Inca Trail this has more archeological sites and a unique ...



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