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32

Even though the people who walk past are unlikely to be want to buy a suitcase right now, they are still the target demographic. How many other locations are there in a city where you can open a store where 100% of the people that walk past are people that travel by air, and thus the type of people that will be in the market for your products? How many ...


30

The most important thing in this situation is to get documentation about your luggage as soon as possible. No matter what the airline says, the only thing that matters is what they write. As this issue might be continued within the legal system (lawyers, etc) you should start gathering documents you can show to the judge. As I see it, the most important ...


29

It depends on where you are and how you're travelling. If you need to pass through customs then the baggage collection area is typically closed to all but travellers, so requires forethought and an outlay of a flight to gain access. However in some circumstances, i.e. domestic flights, definitely in Australia and the U.S. amongst others, the statement is ...


25

One time checking a backpack in for Virgin Atlantic I was offered a giant, durable, resealable (great for security checks), clear plastic bag, similar to a trash bag but thicker, with the airline's logo on it, to prevent any straps or hooks from getting caught in the baggage handling. Since that flight I've found that most legacy airlines have these. I've ...


25

Yes they don't check it. Why there isn't more theft? This has been discussed on Metafilter and I think this comment sums it up: The simple answer is that there's no way to know that the owner of the bag you're taking isn't standing right next to you. Throw in all the security measures nearby, and any thinking thief is going to prefer shoplifting or ...


24

If you buy a mobile phone, and the store tells you it has 2gb RAM, then when you reach home and open the box, you find that it has only 1gb of RAM (and the manual states the same as well), who's to blame now? the manufacturer or the store? of course the store. The same exact thing happened to you, regardless of the reason, whether it is plain cheating, ...


21

Take two suitcases. You will (probably) get charged extra for the overweight bag, and if it's too overweight they won't accept it at all. And you will pay again on the return. Assuming you are going on vacation, you will most likely buy something and need a way to carry it home. yes? One overweight, stuffed to capacity case won't work. Note that a ...


21

One thing I use and are available easily is, ahem, Alcohol. A few drops and rubbing tight can clean the stickers very easily There are many alternatives too. WD-40, anything with acetone, Goo Gone, etc. As Dan Neely points out, be cautious when using acetone because it can melt some plastics.


19

The TSA mandates that luggage can be opened without the owner's presence. Many suitcases therefore have special locks created by a company called Travel Sentry that are designed to be openable with some sort of code/master key. If your lock has a diamond logo like the one in this picture, it is one of those locks. Image released under CC-BY-SA license by ...


19

It's the Travel Agent's responsibility. Period. A Travel-Agent that transfer you to the airline to solve your problems is like your lawyer telling you to go convince the judge you're innocent. It's their job. Let me explain why: Travel Agent are the middle man in this scenario, they work for the airline to get you a seat. Once they do that, they either ...


18

Setting aside the people who suddenly need more or different suitcases, an airport is one of the few places where you feel dissatisfied with the suitcases you have. While they're sitting in your closet, they're fine. You've used them for years and they work. But for the hour or two after you've packed them, lugged them from the car into the airport, and ...


18

I just found it in Ground support equipment: It is called "Belt loader".


18

This category of equipment is known as "Ground Support Equipment" (see Wikipedia article). This includes a variety of utility vehicles, including refuelers, dollies, chocks, buses and more. However, the one you're after is the Belt loader: Belt loaders are vehicles with conveyor belts for unloading and loading of baggage and cargo on aircraft. A belt ...


17

Overweight bags are not only so designated as a way to make money for the airline . They can actually be difficult for baggage handlers to, well, handle, and to place inside the hold etc. The extra fee is to deter you from bringing a heavy bag; the airline would definitely prefer even a single traveller to bring two lighter bags. Then to complicate matters ...


15

An ordinary bathroom scale should be accurate within a pound or two. If you have a digital scale that won't register such small weights, then weigh yourself, weigh yourself holding the suitcase, and subtract. If you are away from home or don't have a bathroom scale, pharmacies often have a scale inside the store that you can use, either for free or by ...


14

Yes, you can check in anything you like as long as the airline is reasonably assured that a) it contains nothing nefarious/dangerous, and b) will survive the trip without disintegrating into bits along the way. However, what are you hoping to accomplish with the bubble wrap? The original cardboard box and its Styrofoam inserts have already been designed to ...


14

I find this stuff works extremely well on any paper labels (not so well on plastic labels) ... ... available from many places (e.g. Maplins in the UK and from any Servisol stockist)


13

Here's my limited understanding of limited release :) Baggage is basically divided into 3 categories: baggage that the airline will accept, baggage that it will not accept based on its rules, and baggage that it will only accept if you agree to "limited release": I.e. they will only accept the piece of baggage if you agree, in writing, to release the airline ...


13

As I understand it, lithium batteries are not permitted to be carried aboard if there is any possibility of the contacts being shorted out in transit (this can lead to excessive current draw, heat, and possibly fire or even explosion). If the battery is inside your laptop, it is considered protected against accidental short. If a battery is carried outside ...


12

Out of first hand experience with this as a previous cabin crew, sometimes the cabin crew of a flight signal the ground agents about the overhead compartments being full in the middle of the boarding process, so to avoid possible delays if removing excess hand luggage from the cabin is needed, the ground agents will prohibit cabin luggage for the remaining ...


11

When you check in at DEL, you should ask that the bag be checked all the way through to MEM, even though yes, you will still need to claim it and re-check it at ORD. Passengers on all international flights to the U.S. are processed upon arrival at their first airport in the U.S. (including transit passengers; the U.S. does not have sterile transit). In your ...


11

TSA approved travel locks are a joke. TSA (and anyone who cares) has a master key which will open it. The locks are very light weight, and easy to break. So, in my opinion, a TSA-approved lock is good for exactly one thing: Slowing someone down who might try to get into your bag in your presence. That is to say, on a bus, or train, or in the airport. ...


11

Number one easiest way: A padlock. It comes down to psychology: you're looking for a bag to steal - are you going to choose a locked one or an easily-opened one? Secondly, having a unique, distinct bag is likely a deterrent too. A thief is less likely to pick up the gaudy unicorn-emblazoned pink and purple backpack than the standard black bag that has ...


10

Suitcases may fail in transit. That's a built-in market for replacements.


10

No laws as such, but check with your travel insurance or your flight/holiday booker. If they are a part of ABTA, you should find the process relatively painless. Responsibility is a tricky thing - most will blame customs, who are separate from the 3 organisations you have named. I always use airlines that will reimburse my incidentals until my luggage ...


10

While the shipping box is amply strong to keep the monitor from getting crushed, it is not as strong against punctures. And bubble wrap does not really address this aspect either. When I have flown with monitors, I have filled the space inside the box with folded clothing or sheets of cardboard. This helps protect the monitor if the corner of a large hard ...


10

EasyJet's policy is that you have an allowed number of bags and an allowed weight. As long as each bag isn't too heavy, you can distribute the weight between the bags however you wish. This FAQ on their site explicitly says you can distribute weight between two bags (when you're allowed to carry two bags); their baggage allowances page says that an ...


10

Checked bags may be opened during screening. So the plastic wrap would be removed. You could get a duffel bag with a draw string and put your backpack in it. That would offer more protection then a plastic bag, but it would take some room in your backpack to carry around when your not using the duffel. The TSA's site has some tips.


10

A friend of mine has a small glass (beer, wine, vodka, whisky, etc.) collection and I buy glasses every now and then for him when I travel. I know it's probably not the same but most of the tips can probably be applied to any other fragile item. Glasses can be very fragile, specially the ones with a foot. I have transported them both in hand luggage and ...


10

It's not that scary actually. To be in the arrival hall, you usually need to be traveller or find some way to go around airport security. The rightful owner of the bag is probably around too, as are many other people, and law enforcement personnel. And then you often have to walk through customs where you could be stopped or interrogated, without even ...



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