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20

Take two suitcases. You will (probably) get charged extra for the overweight bag, and if it's too overweight they won't accept it at all. And you will pay again on the return. Assuming you are going on vacation, you will most likely buy something and need a way to carry it home. yes? One overweight, stuffed to capacity case won't work. Note that a ...


15

Overweight bags are not only so designated as a way to make money for the airline . They can actually be difficult for baggage handlers to, well, handle, and to place inside the hold etc. The extra fee is to deter you from bringing a heavy bag; the airline would definitely prefer even a single traveller to bring two lighter bags. Then to complicate matters ...


12

As I understand it, lithium batteries are not permitted to be carried aboard if there is any possibility of the contacts being shorted out in transit (this can lead to excessive current draw, heat, and possibly fire or even explosion). If the battery is inside your laptop, it is considered protected against accidental short. If a battery is carried outside ...


12

Here's my limited understanding of limited release :) Baggage is basically divided into 3 categories: baggage that the airline will accept, baggage that it will not accept based on its rules, and baggage that it will only accept if you agree to "limited release": I.e. they will only accept the piece of baggage if you agree, in writing, to release the airline ...


10

TSA approved travel locks are a joke. TSA (and anyone who cares) has a master key which will open it. The locks are very light weight, and easy to break. So, in my opinion, a TSA-approved lock is good for exactly one thing: Slowing someone down who might try to get into your bag in your presence. That is to say, on a bus, or train, or in the airport. ...


9

Out of first hand experience with this as a previous cabin crew, sometimes the cabin crew of a flight signal the ground agents about the overhead compartments being full in the middle of the boarding process, so to avoid possible delays if removing excess hand luggage from the cabin is needed, the ground agents will prohibit cabin luggage for the remaining ...


8

Limited Releases are applied to baggage that the airline considers to be at higher risk for damage during flights and transfers. They often apply it to large sporting goods, fragile items, poorly packed items, all ready damaged items and others. Due to the low weight of your bag vs its size, they likely were afraid that it would be fragile and therefore ...


8

On the page for excess baggage charges there's a separate section For seamen traveling within Europe which strongly suggests that's what your "Marine" refers to - a seaman.


6

Baggage theft in the USA is no worse than in Europe, as long as you have no valuables in your luggage you have no worries. And for the opportunistic thief, a lock is a flag that says there maybe something worth stealing in the bag. I never lock my bags, and with more than a million miles flying have only lost one maglight flashlight out of my bags in all ...


4

The kicker is the delay, once you pass the airlines reporting deadline, the chances for compensation drop to basically zero. Too easy for folks to start claiming all sorts of non-existant items. Personally I would have been persistent with calls or perhaps gone back to the airport to report the theft. At this point your best bet is to write a polite ...


4

No, it's not the same. Whether that's the case for a given journey will depend on a few details but, unlike the US, there is no blanket requirement to pick up your luggage and walk it through customs when entering Germany or the EU. Usually, in Europe, your luggage will be routed to your final destination and you will clear customs there. You haven't ...


4

SafeTravel covers this somewhat, saying you'll want to check the details on your deodorant / other can. If it says it's a flammable product, it may not be permitted in your checked luggage. If it's not flammable, however, then it should be fine to travel with, provided the top is on. So to be clear - it's the flammability that's more of a concern here, ...


4

Lithium batteries are a safety hazard as a thermal runaway can and has lead to fires. They are permitted in carry-on because if a fire starts, it can be fought and extinguished, as in this incident near Sydney. the Australian Transport Safety Bureau remarked in their investigation: In the meantime, the ATSB stressed, "this event reinforces the importance ...


3

Due to safety concerns, IATA issues guidelines concerning the transport of lithium batteries, which airlines will likely enforce. (In a worst case scenario, a lithium battery could spontaneously explode and cause a fire in the cargo hold, which is inaccessible to humans during the flight.) The Lithium Battery Guidance Document for 2014 states (emphasis ...


3

I had to do exactly that once, at London Heathrow. What I did was to give the old bag to one of the cleaners emptying the bins. He took it and probably disposed it somewhere.


3

Maybe. It depends. First you have to get it out of the USA - and there are laws about that. 22 CFR 123.17(c) is the key part of "22 CFR 123.17 - Exports of firearms, ammunition, and personal protective gear.". 17c states that: (c) Port Directors of U.S. Customs and Border Protection shall permit U.S. persons to export temporarily from the United ...


3

What makes you think that because you have a permit to own a gun in the US means you can carry that gun in other countries? You can't, you'd need a permit from that other country. And if you're transiting 3rd countries, you may need a permit from all those countries as well (depending on the local law there, and how you're transiting). Karlson already ...


3

As at October 4, 2012, WizzAir implemented a new cabin baggage policy. Press release here. Now, you: "can travel with a free small cabin bag (up to 42x32x25cm) or pay a ₤9 online fee to bring a large cabin bag (up to 56x45x25cm) on board. Goods purchased at the airport after security (an important source of revenue for Wizz Air’s 81 airport ...


2

You should probably attempt these in the given order: If the broken bag is small enough compared to the new one, place it within the new bag Ask security Ask your airline personnel Leave the suitcase open and as obviously empty as you can make it next to a bin with a piece of paper that says "TRASH" or equivalent


2

A lot of people answered, but here is another reason. Its to make sure your item isn't damaged or opened while loading/unloading. Some airlines will refuse to check your luggage if its not wrapped correctly. During a recent trip, I was told to wrap a wheelchair in this plastic cocoon before the agent would accept it.


2

Depending on the day and how busy they are, you might be able to just check them in for your next trip. I did it quite early for one from Seattle to Portland as well - very similar trip actually. As you approach the ticket windows, on your left is the baggage check in and the guy will give you a ticket for it. Alternatively, if they say it's too early, ...


2

The whole idea behind making sure that electronic devices work is to make sure that the internal parts are not replaced with a bomb, if someone tries to smuggle a bomb inside an electronic device, it will not be possible to achieve that while keeping the original components intact, so the best is just to make sure the device is working and this will exclude ...


2

The US domestic answer is that aerosol toiletries are fine: the TSA says that aerosols are prohibited, "except for personal care or toiletries in limited quantities". The regulations in other countries are, I believe, broadly similar. As a random other example, Britsh Airways' dangerous goods list says (page 2) that "Non-radioactive medicinal or toilet ...


2

It depends; it appears that some are and some are not. If flying within the US, the FAA has a table of items that are allowed and forbidden on airplanes (either as checked or carry-on luggage). From that table, you can see that, for instance, aerosol sunscreen is allowed, pressurized whipped cream is allowed in checked luggage but not carry-on, and spray ...


2

Their website clearly states checked baggage allowance. Due to health and safety reasons the weight of any one piece of checked-in baggage must not exceed 32 kilograms. Source Wizz Air Website The same link also explains Cabin Baggage where there are no limits in weight but they do specify specific size dimensions of baggage. Wizz Air offers two ...


1

Just as a note for future travels, as far as I remember beside of the problem with the battery in the luggage you might face a second problem: Electronic devices in your carry on must be able to be turned on for inspection. They will not ask for this every time, but it can happen, and happened to me already several times. You will have a hard time turning ...


1

There is one additional reason your approach may not only lead to your battery being confiscated, but now your laptop being confiscated. As specified in this article, all electronic devices carried in carry-on luggage must be fully charged and functional. If it does not turn on, it may be confiscated prior to boarding. There are now concerns that ...


1

I've researched the regulations since then, and it seems that some airlines/airports do not allow you to pack "spare" lithium batteries in your checked in luggage. This leaves us wondering what exactly the definition of "spare" is, as this was not really a spare battery; we just separated it from the laptop temporarily for traveling. A "spare" battery ...


1

The primary purpose of most luggage locks is not to guard against a bag being opened by unauthorized persons, but rather to ensure that the bags don't get opened by things they brush against. They may also provide some protection against the possibility of a bag being opened by the owner of a similar-looking bag who mistook it for his own (unless that other ...


1

You have to differentiate between 3 things: Government air travel security restrictions Airline policy Customs restrictions Number 1 depends on the airport of departure (and any other airports where you get re-screened). For example, if you fly from the USA to Moscow, a straight razor would be most likely allowed in checked-in luggage (but forbidden in ...



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