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70

It's quite simple: You can spot more easily whether someone has opened it It can not open by accident The luggage doesn't get dirty You don't want your expensive luggage to be scratched! It looks really sexy


42

It depends on where you are and how you're travelling. If you need to pass through customs then the baggage collection area is typically closed to all but travellers, so requires forethought and an outlay of a flight to gain access. However in some circumstances, i.e. domestic flights, definitely in Australia and the U.S. amongst others, the statement is ...


40

I remember seeing this at an airport once before. They didn't have this at my local international airport so I thought it was some crazy thing for paranoid fliers. But in hindsight it has a purpose. The companies that provide these services claim a lot, but it is definitely going to provide the protection from the following things: Tampering (or at least ...


39

Because you only gain 11.7% volume and give up a bunch of other advantages, including making packing worse. The volume of luggage with maximum checked-luggage dimensions (W + L + H <= 62)[1] is 27in x 21in x 14in = 7938in3. The volume of the cube is 20.7in3 = 8869.7in3. Only 11.7% more. If maximizing (packing) volume (inside a large regular space) was ...


37

Unaccompanied bags are only allowed in freight not on passenger flights. As you will have to show your boarding pass at the gate at Heathrow, this will be checked against the luggage loaded. If the passenger is missing or hasn't boarded, their luggage will be offloaded due to security concerns. This is normal practice across almost all airlines/airports I ...


35

Even though the people who walk past are unlikely to be want to buy a suitcase right now, they are still the target demographic. How many other locations are there in a city where you can open a store where 100% of the people that walk past are people that travel by air, and thus the type of people that will be in the market for your products? How many ...


33

Yes they don't check it. Why there isn't more theft? This has been discussed on Metafilter and I think this comment sums it up: The simple answer is that there's no way to know that the owner of the bag you're taking isn't standing right next to you. Throw in all the security measures nearby, and any thinking thief is going to prefer shoplifting or ...


31

The most important thing in this situation is to get documentation about your luggage as soon as possible. No matter what the airline says, the only thing that matters is what they write. As this issue might be continued within the legal system (lawyers, etc) you should start gathering documents you can show to the judge. As I see it, the most important ...


29

A couple of options spring to mind The first is not to fly! Take the train - either TGV in the daytime, or the Trenhotel sleeper overnight, plus onward Spanish trains as needed. You can basically take all the luggage you can physically carry. Book in advance and you can get a bed in a 4 berth cabin from Paris to either Madrid or Barcelona for only €80, and ...


28

If you buy a mobile phone, and the store tells you it has 2gb RAM, then when you reach home and open the box, you find that it has only 1gb of RAM (and the manual states the same as well), who's to blame now? the manufacturer or the store? of course the store. The same exact thing happened to you. Regardless of the reason, whether it is plain cheating, ...


27

One time checking a backpack in for Virgin Atlantic I was offered a giant, durable, resealable (great for security checks), clear plastic bag, similar to a trash bag but thicker, with the airline's logo on it, to prevent any straps or hooks from getting caught in the baggage handling. Since that flight I've found that most legacy airlines have these. I've ...


26

It prevents anyone in the airport from stealing anything from your bag. Not a problem in many European/USA airports, but when travelling through, say, Africa, you have to be careful. I remember a friend of mine, after transferring through Johannesburg, picking up her laptop case from the luggage carousel and remarking that it felt very light.


26

Normally I carry a small bag for the overhead compartment, but I was flying from Heathrow to NYC once and carrying only my baise en ville... It caused me to get flagged up for further questioning by airline security (it was a US carrier). They were very worried that no baggage was checked and I had no carry on. I was attending a party on short notice ...


25

Plastic wrap, or some sort of net, is also a common technique for people traveling with backpacking packs. The number of protruding straps, handles, etc. are irresistible bait for baggage handlers or machines to grab your bag by the wrong strap and rip it apart. Bundling it until it reaches your destination prevents backpack disabling misadventure.


25

A friend recently did this, flying from LON (London) to SYD (Sydney). I went shopping with him and found a hard-shell suitcase. They're surprisingly light, and Samsonite has claimed theirs is "strong enough to stand on". We then removed his harddisk drive. This is the most valuable and most fragile part of the computer. It's also feasible to do the ...


24

The only 'tricks' I can suggest are four methods: 1) Put dense, heavy items in your carry-on. I travel a lot, and am hardly ever weighed. Until my most recent Auckland -> London flight, when believe it or not, I had 10.5kg in my carry on, when the limit is 7, and Murphy's Law - they weighed it, first time I've had that in 10 years. We looked at each ...


23

Several things spring to mind: Paying for excess baggage (if needed) is usually cheaper online than in person When you check in online, you can pick your seats, so you can get that sorted before everyone else does theirs at the airport (so you can often get better seats) You know you have a seat (reduced chance of getting bumped because you'll already have ...


23

Although I haven't brought champagne in checked luggage, I have brought wine on multiple occasions. (Typically bringing it home from places with nice wine.) I roll a nice soft Tshirt around it tightly, and if I have two bottles (which might clink against each other) then after each is rolled in a shirt I wrap the two of them together in another shirt or ...


22

I can't find the reference now, but there was a great story that an organisation was testing security at airports around the world, by taking a suitcase to the airport and leaving it there, timing how long before it got stolen or identified. The exception was Johannesburg, where the car was hijacked enroute, and the suitcase never made it to the airport ;) ...


22

Shrinkwrapping your luggage also protects anything protruding or attached such as handles, straps, fittings, padlocks, wheels, etc. Apparntly it's also used to keep things of odd shapes and sizes together as in this photo from Bangkok airport: (Thanks to WikiMedia Commons for the photo)


22

Funnily enough, there's scientifically exact solution to this - it's known as the Knapsack problem and is considered to be NP-complete - it is expected that no algorithm can be both correct and fast (polynomial-time) on ALL cases. But naturally there are tips and suggestions to help guide you towards an optimal solution. Running shoes, it's good to ...


22

Think about what your luggage goes through from the time you check it until you get it back. It travels on automatic conveyor belts. In many situations, it must be shunted from one conveyor belt to another. This is done by machines, not humans. The machines cannot see the "fragile" tag. It is moved from conveyor-belt to dolly by a human. The human may, or ...


22

Any hotel or hostel will allow you to check your bags at the front desk after you check out... it's commonly done, and I've never stayed anywhere that didn't allow this.


22

On an aircraft like one you're on, it's interesting to realise that the cargo hold is actually pressurised, just like the cabin. (The floor between the two is not a pressure bulkhead, so needs to be roughly the same or it could collapse from the pressure. However, as you've observed, the temperature is often cold as while the cabin is warmed, the cargo ...


22

One thing I use and are available easily is, ahem, Alcohol. A few drops and rubbing tight can clean the stickers very easily There are many alternatives too. WD-40, anything with acetone, Goo Gone, etc. As Dan Neely points out, be cautious when using acetone because it can melt some plastics.


21

X Rays don't penetrate metal. Circuit boards have a lot of metal and solder, making it easy to conceal items within. If the TSA can't see it, they get nervous. Hence the 'take out your laptop.' (Why they don't require that of iPads, I don't know.) Now, all this being said, you can get bags that have laptop compartments. The only requirement is that ...


21

The TSA guide says that "Realistic Replicas of Explosives" are not allowed, and yours kind of qualifies. Of course it lacks a critical component, namely an accelerant and/or explosive, but good luck convincing airport authorities anywhere in the world. The best thing that comes to mind is to disassemble partly the components, particularly the analog ones -- ...


21

Take two suitcases. You will (probably) get charged extra for the overweight bag, and if it's too overweight they won't accept it at all. And you will pay again on the return. Assuming you are going on vacation, you will most likely buy something and need a way to carry it home. yes? One overweight, stuffed to capacity case won't work. Note that a ...


21

No, using a "TSA lock" is not compulsory. What using one does is enable TSA to physically inspect your luggage, if they so deem it necessary, without cutting your existing lock(s). If you use a "TSA lock", it has been designed to allow TSA to use a master key to open it. Of course, this also means, as you have surmised, that anyone else with a master key ...


20

It's an interesting dilemma to be sure. Normally I pack wire ties into my carry on not the whole bag of them buy just enough to tie the locks on the luggage. They are easily removed with scissors or wire cutters but it does tell you if the bag you have checked in have been messed with since having the exact brand make of the wire ties is difficult at best. ...



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