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23

One time checking a backpack in for Virgin Atlantic I was offered a giant, durable, resealable (great for security checks), clear plastic bag, similar to a trash bag but thicker, with the airline's logo on it, to prevent any straps or hooks from getting caught in the baggage handling. Since that flight I've found that most legacy airlines have these. I've ...


20

One thing I use and are available easily is, ahem, Alcohol. A few drops and rubbing tight can clean the stickers very easily There are many alternatives too. WD-40, anything with acetone, Goo Gone, etc. As Dan Neely points out, be cautious when using acetone because it can melt some plastics.


14

I find this stuff works extremely well on any paper labels (not so well on plastic labels) ... ... available from many places (e.g. Maplins in the UK and from any Servisol stockist)


10

Checked bags may be opened during screening. So the plastic wrap would be removed. You could get a duffel bag with a draw string and put your backpack in it. That would offer more protection then a plastic bag, but it would take some room in your backpack to carry around when your not using the duffel. The TSA's site has some tips.


9

You can use very hot water, the coarser (dark green) side of a dishwashing sponge, and quite a bit of elbow grease to scrub the sticky part of the tape/stickers away. This might be a very time consuming operation depending on how many such stickers you have to clean off. If the suitcase is tough, and you are not afraid to scratch it, you can increase your ...


9

I have yet to meet a label that didn't yield easily to Goo Gone. Beware that I've found some printing on packaging that also wipes off with it.


8

Olive oil worked well for me. Just let the sticky residue soak in it for a bit before rubbing it with a cloth. Another product I have tried is a sort of a cleaning eraser. It works well, but it also requires quite a bit of rubbing (source)


8

I've found that using medical adhesive remover (like this one) works to remove stickers. I happen to have a bunch lying around that I've never used, but you can order them from Amazon (they're not expensive; if you look, you'll probably find something cheaper than I did).


7

I think labels vary in their adhesive systems employed, so there is no one 'right' answer. I can't speak for the proprietary products mentioned in other answers, as I tend to avoid spending money on these when a common chemical will do the trick, but trying the following should remove most labels: Peeling carefully and slowly - works sometimes with ...


7

If you have more or less 30-40 kilo overall, you will have to get an additional luggage. If you are closer to 25 kilos overall, the recommendation is to get a bag out of a good nylon (like a light, cheap backpack or similar) and put the items in there that are not fragile and where you do not care that they get crumpled. Stuff the items above 20 kilos into ...


6

Converted from a comment to this answer. Since we are all sharing Grandma's secret stain remover tricks: in my experience, gasoline (AE, petrol in British English) works much better than alcohol to remove adhesive residuals.


5

Nail polish remover, of which the principal ingredient is Acetone, is a general purpose solvent, and works well on many organics such as glues. If you have diabetes, especially type 1, your urine might work too (due to Acetone). You might want to check that it won't dissolve your suitcase too.


5

Remove them as soon as possible, they become harder to remove over time. Use a hair dryer to warm up the stickers, this "softens" the glue (at least for some types). Pull very gently so as not to tear the stickers apart, and give the glue time to separate. As a last resort, use alcohol, acetone or another organic solvent to dissolve or weaken the glue.


4

According to the TSA website, compressed cylinders are not allowed: http://www.tsa.gov/traveler-information/prohibited-items#9 Section: Disabling Chemicals & Other Dangerous Items Fire extinguishers and other compressed gas cylinders Allowed: NO This doesn't mean the airline doesn't have specific requirements, but assuming you are leaving ...


4

Apparently, I am not the only one who is interested in such a suitcase: Samsonite released a new series last year, called "Spin Trunk". It "translates to a 20% light lid compartment and an 80% maximised base compartment for easy packing." Not exactly what I want, but one step towards the ultimate suitcase. More information here.


4

I have also used the wrapping service to tie together two pieces of luggage so that they count as one. I had two soft duffel bags but my fare allowed me to check-in only one item. Since their cumulative weight was inferior or equal to the allowed weight I wrapped them together and thus checked-in only one piece of luggage.


4

You can also use the (paying) plastic wrapping services that are often found in the airport terminal. This will ensure that all straps, handles, etc do not protrude, and thus will not be caught in the tapis roulant. If TSA/Security or whoever needs to access your bag, they will cut through the wrapping and should then replace it with their own heavy-duty ...


4

If you buy a travelling backpack, i.e. a backpack that opens like a suitcase, normally they will have a pocket that you can zip the straps into, which keep them out of the way when checking in. Like this (courtesy from MEC's website):


4

The airlines all make it clear that they do not guarantee space on board for all items that are eligible carry-on luggage, as pointed out in another answer. I would presume that you cannot claim a higher loss allowance for a bag just because it is forced to be checked during boarding. I wouldn't rely on an agent's word at the gate, either. The best way to ...


4

Assuming that you are not arriving from a pre-clearance place: When arriving in Chicago, you will first need to go through passport checks, then through customs and can only then check in your bag for the next leg. This holds regardless of whether you booked both legs onto the same ticket. After that, the procedure differs: if they are not on the same ...


4

I have successfully removed labels using water and a cloth to remove the paper exposing the adhesive than using white spirit on a paper towel to remove the adhesive.


3

Heat the areas to a point where the glue melts but the plastic doesn't, then slide the sticker off. Best things to do this with are a blowtorch, some hot coals, an open fire or a really good heater. Alternatively bathe your suitcase for a few hours (perhaps even overnight) and then put it somewhere nice and warm to dry off.


3

As an example, read American Airlines Conditions of Carriage, specifically Carry on Baggage and Liability. The suitability of carry-on baggage will be determined by American. Each customer will be limited to one carry-on bag and one personal item. A personal item includes a purse, briefcase, laptop, or small book bag style backpack. A personal item must ...


3

The backpack I have has a pocket at the bottom with a cover that zips over all the straps sort of like what alanh mentions in his answer. That'll only help you if you consider this important enough the next time you buy a backpack, though. Apart from that, I've also got a combined rain cover and transit bag. Something like this: ...


3

Ultimately it would depend on the ground staff working that day. The check in rules are fairly cut & dry, you are supposed to be checked in XX minutes before departure. End of story. Most airlines recommend that you arrive much earlier than that to make sure you have time to be checked in. In your case you arrived at 75 minutes, which just barely ...


2

As others have already written, it might depend on the airline, ground staff, airport, terminal, maybe also your status/class of travel, etc. But it's certainly not the case that inefficient handling or the fact that airport personnel seems partly responsible for a problem makes a big difference. I once missed a flight because of very long and unusual ...


2

Without checking every airline's conditions, most (if not all) airlines only allow carry-on luggage under the provision that there is available space. Basically, there is usually not enough stowage in the cabin should all passengers bring the maximum allowed amount of carry-on luggage, so it is bound to happen now and then that some intended carry-on luggage ...


2

Not tried, but it strikes me you could use a baby stroller bag like this one. They're meant for use at carry-on/gate check, but I reckon there'd be no problem checking them in. They also fold down quite small so you'd not waste too much space while you're backpacking.


2

Whether or not you are charged for an individual bag going over the 20kg depends on the airline. It seems to me that if the airline says "2 bags of 20kg" (rather than "up to 2 bags, max 40kg") that means that each bag cannot go over 20kg (without extra charge at least). You should be able to find the answer in the luggage info, or terms & conditions, ...


1

The other thing I've seen some bags come with is handy nylon+velcro organisers for straps. Kind of hard to describe, but here goes: Short length of strap-style nylon, about 4-6 inches long. Velcro on each end Place horizontally across the long dangly end of your strap after tightening all the way/clipping where possible Wrap the dangly end around it, ...



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