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1

My strategy as a non business traveler is to have a few accounts with airlines that I know I will want to redeem miles with and that have a good airline alliance/code share program. For example, I have a mileage account with American. I fly quite a bit with American as well as US Airlines and Alaska. Then I use the miles collected with these airlines ...


2

There are also credit cards which give out cashback in the form of air miles, however their pay-out is usually lower than simply getting a fixed cashback in dollars. Aeroplan points exchanged for international business tickets can be worth 4.5-6CPM and if you manage to find an upgradeable ticket it can be 10-12CPM. I've never seen a generic cashback ...


38

To directly answer the title question, yes, non-business travelers can absolutely benefit from airline loyalty programs (i.e. earning points/miles as well as status.) Whether it's worth it for you in particular, though, will be extremely dependent on your particular situation and what options are available to you on the routes you normally fly, as well as ...


11

tldr: If you travel once or twice a year, on full-price airlines with frequent flyer progammes, sign up for them. But don't obsess over them, and focus on price and other benefits first. Longer answer: As always, it depends. Many (most?) budget airlines don't have a frequent flyer programme (or at least one comparable to those on full-service airlines), ...


24

There are three things that set (some) frequent flier programs apart from other rewards programs. How important these are to you may determine whether they are worth doing. The first is "Status" which you refer to by mentioning business travellers. Never lining up, spending an hour or more less in the airport than others, waiting in the lounge eating and ...


4

Unfortunately that is difficult to answer: About two years ago a large part of the industry (United, Delta) shifted the accrual from "miles flown" to "dollars spend" with a very complex set of rules. These programs are now pretty much useless for the occasional flyer. Other ways to earn miles are associated credit cards. These offer miles for dollars spend ...


5

It all depends on how frequently you travel and what type of travels. If you just perform 2 domestic flights every 2 years, then miles collection isn't worth... If you take more than few flights every year including some long distance flights, then it is worth, even in economy class, even with the cheapest ticket. To give you some figures, with some ...


3

Simple: since you have qualified for Gold this year, you will drop back to Gold. And yes, many airlines will "status match" top-tier flyers in other airline programs, just figure out which ones would be good for your flying patterns and Google. This may or may not require meeting a "challenge" to fly a certain amount with the new airline though, and you ...


3

36 months (three years) after 13 August 2014 is the 13 August 2017. Therefore your flight in November 2016 will be sufficient to keep your account active. You do need to take the flight yourself. It won't count if you don't take the flight.



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