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6

90 days (in any 180-day period) is in any event the longest you can stay on a Schengen visa. Schengen visas can be valid for up to 5 years but this has no bearing on the maximum stay, which is still at most 90 days. After that, it's usually necessary to leave the Schengen area for another 90 days before being allowed to return and use your visa again (at ...


6

I'm a resident of Berlin since birth (some 25–30 years ago) and I never owned a car. Imho the transportation system is perfectly sufficient under most circumstances. The exceptions are according to my experience: You need to transport heavy or unwieldy objects on a regular basis. You need to ride often on weekday nights between 1:00 and 4:30 a.m. from or ...


5

Even if Relaxed is completely right with his answer, I'll try to simplify some issues and add a few other points you should consider: As a citizen of an EEA country, you have the unlimited right to stay and work in other EEA countries, but you have to fulfil some requirements. Some of the requirements may be covered by national law and differ between the ...


5

British citizens are certainly not limited to 90 days in any 180-day period. Before I explain the rules that do apply to you, let's consider where the 90-days-in-any-180-day-period limit comes from, namely article 5 of the Schengen Borders Code: Entry conditions for third-country nationals For intended stays on the territory of the Member States ...


3

I've done this in Thailand, New Zealand, Australia, and the U.S. During the day, the main thing I look for are large-ish clump of trees and bushes off to the side away from foot traffic. I've found these at the side of roads away from buildings and sidewalks, at the far end of low-trafficked parking lots, and other misc. places. I try to avoid city parks, as ...


3

How to do it? Probably almost as many possible answers as there are travelers. My approach may not work for others, or they may find it distasteful: Pay off all debts including late wife's medical bills. Get rid of TV and car; learn to bicycle or walk everywhere. (Bus/train/car rental/plane only when time is a problem.) Get medical care from the U.S. ...


3

Great question and answers. In terms of accommodation, I didn't see house/pet sitting option listed yet. It may be a new(wer) thing since the question was posted. There are several sites where you pay an annual fee and have access to housesits all over the world. The owners of the home leave to travel themselves and sometimes even leave a car. You have a ...


2

There's no one answer to this question applicable to every place on the planet and, really, it's just common sense. :) Every big city will have service providers that can get you a long-stay, at a price, but for less then the cost of a hotel. If you speak the language and can put in the time, finding your own place will obviously be cheaper. AirBNB and ...


2

When I lived in Berlin a few years ago, I used to play basketball with the sport club of the Technical University https://www.tu-sport.de/index.php?id=31. It is open to people outside the university, too, and the costs are very low. Be sure to book in advance when the new semester starts/ends, because some activities tend to become booked out quickly. The ...


1

My suggestion is to book something for 1-2 weeks on airbnb, at a hotel or hostel, or something similar. Then, during your first couple of weeks there, make some connections and look for people renting a spare bedroom. I've never been to Colombia, but I've done this in Mexico, Portugal and Cuba with good success. How to find rooms for rent varies greatly ...


1

If parking offsite is still too pricey for long term trip, you might want to try renting a car one-way and doing it to and from the airport. I did this on a recent trip flying out of another region and it saved me a ton of money. If you don't like that idea then there are some other good suggestions for ways to save money on parking on this O'Hare parking ...


1

I have followed several long distance walkers, one on a blog and an other in the book they published about it, as well as seeing blog items that I do not follow long term. They use wheeled transports, dragged behind them, for those parts of their trip when they needed to transport more than they could carry or even for the whole. Here is a link to the blog ...


1

You probably won't need to use car every day, but, depending on your preferences and lifestyle, you may want to have a car for weekend trips. If you don't like driving, leave it. If you like driving, compare how much would it be for you to move car versus how much would it be to rent similar car in Germany. Driving in Germany is fun, and there's a lot of ...



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