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26

There are some strategies that you can use: Prepare: Check websites like Tripadvisor or Yelp before you go there. If you really want to plan, write down the restaurants you want to visit. Based on the ratings and comments there, you should be able to judge if it is an authentic restaurant with a good service. Don't stick to the main street: Very often, ...


20

I always consult Happycow. This is a website for vegetarian, vegan, and vegetarian-friendly restaurants. A good side-effect is that I end up at some very unusual and non-touristic places, and that the number of options reduced from hundreds to a handful or a few dozen at most. Perhaps you don't always want to eat vegetarian, but even as a non-vegetarian you ...


14

Just some days ago, I was on the streets in Spain with a friend, and she decided to ask a policeman for a place to have lunch. The restaurant he recommended was indeed popular with policemen. There were several daily menus on offer, at low price, and food was a plenty - I could not finish the desert. Concerning asking locals: Sometimes I ask several, and it ...


10

I went to university in Burnaby. It's not hard to get to, but it's also not central and you miss out on a lot of the benefits of staying in central Vancouver. Plus the skytrain doesn't run much later than midnight so if you want to experience the Vancouver night life you're going to be spending a lot on taxis. Even though my commute to school was over ...


10

I was born in Iran, am not living there, but have traveled a bit in the country. My Farsi (Persian) is not very good and because I grew up outside of Iran stand out on the streets. In short, I'm not exactly a tourist when in Iran, but I'm also not a local. In a few words, Iran is safe for tourists. This both from my own experiences and from the experiences ...


8

One option is to go on a tour of your own city. It sounds odd, but it's really not - I've often been on a city tour and found people from that city on it. Sometimes they're with out-of-town friends, or are new to town, but there's no reason not to! Sydney, for example, has the hop-on, hop-off bus that you could take. Obviously that'll still only take ...


8

The western half of what you're looking at would fall well within the range usually referred to as Allgäu - here is a 'map' of the outlines of that region as used in today's tourism industry, covering both Germany and Austria although originally Allgäu was a part of the German Oberschwaben, see here. The Austrian areas are part of (Nord)Tirol - a map with ...


8

I am a New Zealander who travelled to Iran about two months ago, flying into Shiraz, visited Persepolis, and made my way north by bus through Yazd, a little village called Toudeshk, and Esfahan before reaching Tehran after two weeks. This is a very traditional tourist route through the central part of the country and is entirely safe for Western travellers. ...


7

More and more, I actually go *un*prepared. This lack of preconceived notion results in an experience that's much more unique. Sure, you will not always end up at the 'best' place, but, clearly, that's not what you are (or I am) looking for. For that, there's a whole slew of apps and guidebooks. And, it's easy to avoid the tourist traps and overly popular ...


7

Local food groups Like I mentioned in my answer on how to become a better tourist guide in your home city / country, one of the best ways of discovering of discovering the best local (and usually cheap) places to eat is to find out about the local food-lovers groups in the city. Some of these run scheduled, professionally organised walking food trips (like ...


6

Throughout Europe I've been using the Michelin guides to find restaurants. They have a rating for fanciness and awesomeness of food. I usually go to the restaurants with one fork, which means it has good food for a good price (it tells you the price in the guide). There is an app as well you can download and find all the restaurants in your area. I used the ...


6

An option sugested by a friend is asking in Couch Surfing forums. This is a very good place since the persons there are usually locals or live on the place for some time. They usually enjoy travelling also. To wrap this up, they have local knowledge and will probably understand what you're looking for.


6

If I'm totally lacking in knowledge on the area, I tell the concierge (or staff) at the hotel I'm staying that I'd like to find a restaurant which offers local foods in this amount of budget. If he/she recommends the restaurant in the hotel itself (possibly not the right choice..), I ask again, to tell me the restaurant they go to frequently. This works ...


6

When, while travelling, I visit some friend, the things that I enjoy most are: meals at home, or at least in local restaurants. I remember a small restaurant in a famous beach resort in Portugal with no tourist inside, while tourist traps where only few hundred meters away. local life explained. Christmas time in Tuscany has so many customs that you can't ...


6

Your question reminds me of a quote from a quantum mechanics teacher I once had: Only after teaching a subject twice, one may begin to understand it. Apart from hosting the occasional Couchsurfer, I have no experience myself in being a tourist guide. But I guess: to become a better tourist guide, be a tourist guide. I think in many places, tourist guides ...


6

I travel & trek regularly between 3000-5000+ meters , and I find altitude sickness highly predictable : practically everyone I've seen sick have been outside safety guidelines . First night between 2000-3000, third night still below 4000 , and max 500 meters higher in sleeping altitude for every night ...end of all major problems. Diamox not only ...


5

First of all DON'T listen to tour operators. I made this mistake when I went to San Pedro di Atacama (Chile). On the first day I bought a tour to >6000 m. I suffered a severe form of altitude sickness. Afterwards I could judge on the pictures taken that the scenery was breathtaking. While at location I only felt miserable. I needed 2 days to recover, which ...


5

The best thing you can do is acclimatization. This means you should adjust your body gradually to the height. This can be done for example by increasing the height you're staying from day to day. Another very important fact that is widely used by mountaineers is that you should always sleeps some meters below the highest point of the day. So for example you ...


5

I think Mark already mentioned most things you can do in his question. There is also some medication you can try. In Bolivia this stuff was pretty cheap (as was most other medication) and I assume it is readily available in places where it is needed. I also like to emphasise his point about the randomness of mountain sickness, just because you are fine in ...


5

I am an Iranian and maybe know more about my country, since I live here now. Obviously, there are some places that are not safe, not only for tourists, but also for ordinary citizens. Places like Afghanistan or Pakistan borders, and some sectors in every city. You can ask someone in that city to tell you about those sectors. Nowadays many people in Iran ...


4

Some Neighborhoods Serve Good Food, Others Not I find that the standard for what counts as good food varies dramatically from neighborhood to neighborhood. The result is that a cheap greasy burger joint might be considered the panacea for all hunger in some areas, while in other areas almost every restaurant has well prepared dishes made from fresh ...


4

The only reliable way I found to eat out in local restaurants is when I was accompanied by local friends. Sometimes, good local restaurants are outside the city and need some car driving. Sometimes they are on side and back streets. Sometimes this is just a cafeteria crowded only by locals or street food served in shops that are far less shiny than the ...


4

If you want to eat in a high quality restaurant where they serve good food (where ever this maybe in the world), but for sure in towns & villages of Europe, you abide by one golden rule: Look for the restaurant which is near full to capacity of locals and avoid the restaurant which is virtually empty. Even if it means queueing it will be worth the ...


4

There is plenty of high altitude to be had in the great indoors as well as the great outdoors. When I taught a course in Colorado Springs, I was astonished at how thirsty I was. I always have a bottle or two of juice or water a day when teaching (standing and talking is actually thirsty work), but I drank both of them by morning coffee break. I replaced ...


4

I've yet to visit Vancouver, but I've done some research for an upcoming trip there, so bear that caveat in mind for this answer! Burnaby is east of downtown Vancouver, but still well within the city. It's about as far from downtown as the airport is (though east rather than south), at about 10 miles away. In terms of the SkyTrain, the Expo and Millennium ...


4

Bangalore is a city full of identical shopping malls. There isn't much to see in the city itself. There is Lal Bagh, Cubbon Park, Vidhana Soudha, Bangalore Palace, HAL Museum, Visvesvaraya Technological Museum - that's it, I guess. There are tons of beautiful weekend getaways very close to Bangalore - Nandi Hills, Masinagudi, Bandipur, Mysore, Ooty, Yercaud ...


3

Despite how cheesy this may sound, read the Wikivoyage entry on your city or a travel guidebook if you are expecting to be a tourist guide for someone. Guidebooks such as Lonely Planet (or anything else really) can help you give a historical background on famous landmarks and then you can talk to your friend about that and your own knowledge. There are some ...


3

If you want to stay in the middle of everything, try American Backpacker's Hostel on Homer and Pender. I was skeptical at first, but once I saw their prices I gave them a try, and had a blast! If you want to stay in a "nice hostel", get a hotel. If you want to stay in a hostel, stay at the place with a "Sex Room" upstairs (nobody used it when I was there all ...


3

One practical solution is to find a bookshop and check various guidebooks there, not necessarily travel guides but also books intended for locals. Obviously, the bookshop would probably want you to buy the book instead so don't be too obnoxious.


3

I would say that Geocaching would count as a prime resource. I have used this website for exactly this purpose in various cities. Geocaching is a game where locals hide something at very interesting locations for others to find. The game is to find as many "caches" as possible. The website typically caters locals, but that is what you/I want. You need a GPS ...



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